FICTION / NONFICTION -- APRIL 2019

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: RECOMMENDED READING

Electric Literature

INFO: Recommended Reading is the weekly fiction magazine of Electric Literature, with over 92,000 subscribers in just five years. Every week, the magazine publishes one story, each chosen by today’s best authors and editors.

The best way to get a sense of the kind of stories we’re looking for is to read the Recommended Reading archives, especially the stories recommended by Electric Literature, in which we showcase original fiction.

We can only consider one story by an author at any given time. We look for stories in the range of 1,500 to 10,000 words; if selected, we can offer a payment of $300. (For fiction shorter than 1,500 words, submit to the Recommended Reading Commuter!) We have a 5- to 8-month response time for stories submitted during the general open periods, and a 3-month response time guarantee for members who may submit year-round.

Recommended Reading launched in May 2012 and has since published over 300 issues, including original work by Sheila Heti, A. Igoni Barrett, A.M. Homes, Helen DeWitt, Jim Shepard, Ben Marcus, Etgar Keret, Cesear Aria, Ottessa Moshfegh, Kelly Link, and Mary Gaitskill. We also pride ourselves in championing new voices, and have been early supporters of writers such as Helen Phillips, Sharma Shields, Rebecca Schiff, Diane Cook, and Matt Sumell.

Recommended Reading is digital-only, available for free online for at least a month, and for $0.99 per issue on Kindle.

SUBMISSION PERIOD: April 1 – 7, 2019 

https://electricliterature.com/submit-ebdd3b73083a?fbclid=IwAR1DOJqf9DRP7jyA6nzRcSgBiFTaNcc-KuZMqPxY27jw1_zLm21beazdR30

NEW VOICES AWARD

Lee & Low Books

INFO: The New Voices Award is given annually by children's book publisher Lee & Low Books for a children’s picture book manuscript by a writer of color or Native/Indigenous writer.

Established in 2000, the New Voices Award encourages writers of color and Native nations to submit their work to a publisher that takes pride in nurturing new talent. Past New Voices Award submissions we have published include The Blue Roses, winner of the Paterson Prize for Books for Young People; Sixteen Years in Sixteen Seconds: The Sammy Lee Story, a Texas Bluebonnet Masterlist selection; and It Jes’ Happened: When Bill Traylor Started to Draw, winner of the Ezra Jack Keats New Writer Award Honor. 

ELIGIBILITY:

  1. The contest is open to writers of color and Native nations who are residents of the United States, 18 years or older at the time of entry, and who have not previously had a children’s picture book published.   

  2. Writers who have published work in other venues and genres, including children’s magazines, young adult, and adult fiction or nonfiction, are eligible. Only unagented submissions will be accepted.   

  3. Work that has been published in any format, including online and self-published, is not eligible.   

  4. Manuscripts previously submitted for this award or to LEE & LOW BOOKS will not be considered. 

PRIZE: The Award winner receives a cash prize of $2,000 and our standard publication contract, including our basic advance and royalties for a first-time author. An Honor Award winner will receive a cash prize of $1,000.

IMPORTANT DATES:

·         Submission Period: April 1 – August 31, 2019

·         The Award and/or Honor Award winners will be notified no later than December 31, 2019. 

·         We will announce the winners on January 21, 2020.

https://www.leeandlow.com/writers-illustrators/new-voices-award

 
ELIZA SO FELLOWSHIP 

INFO: Submittable is delighted to announce its third annual Eliza So Fellowship. In 2019, Submittable will offer two month-long residencies in Missoula, Montana, affording time and solitude to writers finishing a book-length project.

The 2019 fellowships will include lodging in Missoula, along with a $500 food stipend and $400 toward travel. Fellows will stay in a private house on the Clark Fork river trail, just blocks from downtown, grocery shopping, the farmers market, parks, restaurants, coffee shops, and more. 

Submittable will accept applications between January 15 and April 5, 2019, and results will be announced June 3. We’re pleased to offer two residencies (one in August and one in September), awarded in the following categories:

  • The Eliza So Fellowship for Immigrant Writers

  • The Eliza So Fellowship for Native American Writers 

The final judge for the Fellowship for Immigrant Writers will be Marcelo Hernandez Castillo

The final judge for the Fellowship for Native American Writers will be Joan Naviyuk Kane.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:

1) You have a novel, collection of stories, memoir, or other prose work (fiction, nonfiction, or hybrid) in progress (100 pages minimum) or poetry collection in progress (30 pages minimum)  

2) You are either:

  • a US immigrant writer (documented or undocumented)

  • a Native American writer

3) You are available during one or both of the following periods:

  • August 3 – August 31, 2019

  • September 1 – September 29, 2019.

 PARTICIPATION:

Fellows will be asked to give a public reading in Missoula and write a blog post of at least 1,000 words for Submittable during their residency. 

If fellows are interested in doing a Brown Bag lunchtime presentation for staff at Submittable's Missoula headquarters during their stay—on their book project, craft, or any literary topic that interests them—we would be delighted. However, a Brown Bag presentation is not required.

ABOUT THE FELLOWSHIP:

This fellowship was named in honor of Eliza So, the mother of Submittable’s Head of People Asta So. Eliza immigrated to the US from Hong Kong in 1982, with her husband and two daughters. She worked in administrative and housekeeping jobs in the San Francisco Bay Area for many years. At age 58, she began showing signs of dementia, and she was diagnosed with early onset of Alzheimer’s in 2012. She is one of the kindest, warmest, and most hard-working people you could meet, and we pay tribute to her life and legacy with this opportunity.

DEADLINE: April 5, 2019

fellowship.submittable.com/submit


DEMOCRACY UNDONE FELLOWSHIP

The GroundTruth Project

INFO: As part of its commitment to reporting on rising global authoritarianism, GroundTruth is offering seven, 2-month reporting fellowships for emerging journalists to report these issues in-depth. Two of those fellowships will focus on reporting in countries where authoritarianism and religion converge.

We are looking for talented, emerging journalists from around the world to be part of this project, and we invite applications from any medium. But please note this special coverage will be the basis for the 2019 season of the GroundTruth Podcast, so all candidates (even those for whom audio is not their primary medium) should include clear and detailed ideas for how they will convey the reporting using evocative and compelling audio.  Past podcasting experience is not required. If you have never worked in audio, we will have producers and editors who will help you execute in the field. 

AWARD: With new support from the MacArthur Foundation and the Henry Luce Foundation, in close collaboration with major publishing outlets, GroundTruth will be able to offer $10,000 to each fellow to cover a project budget for travel/lodging expenses, risk assessment, insurance and training as well as compensation for stories and podcast episodes produced.

DEADLINE: April 7, 2019

https://thegroundtruthproject.org/democracy_undone/

 

ESELEN WRITER’S CAMP

Writing By Writers

INFO: Writing By Writers is pleased to offer fellowships to Esalen Writer's Camp for emerging writers of color and members of the LGBTQIA+ community to amplify all voices that need to be heard. Fellowships cover the full cost of tuition, a shared room and all meals, but do not cover transportation.

An "Emerging Voice" is someone who currently DOES NOT meet any of the below criteria*:

·         Has an B.A., M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D. or minors in Creative Writing.

·         Currently enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs.

·         Writers who have published one or more books through major publishing houses, university presses, or established presses.

·         Current professional magazine/newspaper feature writers or editors.

·         Writers who are widely published in top tier literary journals and/or magazines.

Selection will be based on a writing sample and short statement about why you are interested in attending Esalen Writer's Camp. All submissions will be reviewed by Samantha Dunn and the finalists will be selected by Samantha Dunn and the WxW Board of Directors.

IMPORTANT DATES:

·         Deadline: April 15, 2019

·         Notification: May 1, 2019

www.writingxwriters.org/esalen-writer-s-camp-fellowship 

 

VIETNAMESE FOLIO

[PANK] 

INFO: We are seeking submissions from Vietnamese writers for a special issue! Wherever you are in the world, whether your voice comes from Vietnam’s land or its people, we would love to hear you all. Some specific guidelines are as follows:

1. We accept submissions in English, Vietnamese or both languages.  

2. Any genre of creative writing is welcome (fiction, poetry, non-fiction, hybrid writing, etc). One submission can have pieces from multiple genres.

3. Please limit your submission to five pieces combined into one file, and also attach a short bio. Send us your best craft! 

4. If you want to submit a translation, please include the original work in your submission. 

5. If you submit any pieces that have been previously published, please declare so along with where and when they were published. 

Questions can be directed to  vietnamesefolio@pankmagazine.com ATTN Vietnamese folio. 

-----

Chúng tôi đang nhận đọc bản thảo từ tất cả những nhà văn, nhà thơ Việt Nam cho một số báo đặc biệt sắp tới đây. Dù bạn đang sống ở đâu trên thế giới, dù giọng nói của bạn đến từ trong lòng đất nước Việt Nam hay từ những người mang dòng máu Việt, chúng tôi đều mong được lắng nghe bạn. Sau đây là một số hướng dẫn về việc nộp bài:

1. Bản thảo có thể được viết bằng tiếng Anh, tiếng Việt hoặc cả hai ngôn ngữ. 

2. Chúng tôi xuất bản mọi thể loại văn học (truyện hư cấu và phi hư cấu, thơ, văn thử nghiệm, vv). Một bản thảo có thể bao gồm tác phẩm từ nhiều thể loại.

3. Bạn có thể nộp nhiều nhất là 5 tác phẩm, và xin hãy gửi chung vào cùng một file kèm với tiểu sử ngắn về tác giả. Chúng tôi trông đợi những tác phẩm hay nhất của bạn.

4. Nếu muốn gửi bản dịch, xin hãy gửi kèm với văn bản gốc. 

5. Nếu bất kì tác phẩm nào trong bản thảo của bạn đã được đăng ở ấn phẩm nào trước đây, xin hãy ghi rõ tên ấn phẩm và ngày tháng năm đã đăng. 

Nếu bạn có câu hỏi, xin gửi thư tới vietnamesefolio@pankmagazine.com và ghi trên tiêu đề email là [Câu hỏi về Vietnamese folio].

DEADLINE: April 15, 2019 

pankmagazine.submittable.com/submit/131793/vietnamese-folio

 

2019-2020 Pen Parentis Writing Fellowship for New Parents

INFO: One talented writer who is the parent of at least one child under 10 years old will receive $1000 to further their writing career, a year of mentorship, and will be offered the opportunity to read their winning story at the Pen Parentis Literary Salon in New York City on Tuesday, November 12, 2019. Their winning story will also be published in Dreamers Creative Writing Magazine (both online and in print) as well as included in the annual Dreamers Writing Anthology. 

Submissions call for a new, never-published fiction story—any genre, on any subject—of up to 750 words, double-spaced in Times New Roman 12 point or similar font, with one inch margins. 

Please note: we change word count each year because one of the goals of this project is to keep parents working -- motivating all writers to continue to create new high-quality creative writing at the very busiest time of the parenting journey. 

Write something new! You can do it! 

Put only the title of the story and its word count on the manuscript. Please number your pages! 

One dependent child MUST still be under ten on November 12, 2019 for a writer to be eligible to win this Fellowship.

Please do NOT add any additional information in your cover note, even if you have published a thousand novels and won the Pulitzer. We judge blind and prefer to be surprised by your extensive credentials.

The contest seeks submissions starting March 1 and ends the submission period April 17, 2019 (midnight - or postmark deadline). 

SUBMISSION FEE: $15-20

DEADLINE: April 17, 2019

https://penparentis.submittable.com/submit



Creative Nonfiction Grant

Whiting Foundation

INFO: The Whiting Creative Nonfiction Grant of $40,000 will be awarded to as many as eight writers in the process of completing a book-length work of deeply researched and imaginatively composed nonfiction for a general readership. It is intended for multiyear book projects requiring large amounts of deep and focused research, thinking, and writing at a crucial point mid-process, after significant work has been accomplished but when an extra infusion of support can make a difference in the ultimate shape and quality of the work.

Whiting welcomes applications for works of history, cultural or political reportage, biography, memoir, the sciences, philosophy, criticism, food or travel writing, and personal essays, among other categories. Again, the work should be intended for a general, not academic, reader. Self-help titles and textbooks are not eligible. Examples of the wide range of previous grantees can be found here

Projects must be under contract with a US publisher to be eligible. Contracts with self-publishing companies are not eligible. Applicants must be US citizens or residents. (In previous cycles, projects had to be under contract for two years at time of application; recognizing that many projects do not secure publishing contracts until they are nearly complete, we have removed that restriction.)

Writers must submit the following materials through the online application form by Monday, April 22nd, 2019:

  • The original proposal that led to the contract with a publisher

  • Three sample chapters in their most current form, or up to 25,000 words

  • A statement of progress and the requirements for completion of the book (including a projected budget)

  • A signed and dated contract

  • A current resume

  • A list of grants, fellowships, or other funding received for the book

  • A letter of support from the book’s publisher or editor

  • Two additional letters of support (not to come from your agent)

Each project under submission will have two first-round readers who will evaluate for substance and execution. Finalists will be considered by a panel of four judges who will evaluate for content and need and who will choose the grantees. Readers and judges will consist of experts in the field, and will serve anonymously to shield them from any external pressures. The grantees will be announced in the fall.

If you have any questions about the eligibility of your project or the application process, please contact the Whiting Foundation at nonfiction@whiting.org.

DEADLINE: April 22, 2019

https://www.whiting.org/writers/creative-nonfiction-grant/about

SUMMER WRITERS RETREAT 2019

Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity

INFO: The Summer Writers Retreat is a self-directed program that offers time and space for writers to retreat, reconnect, and re-energize their writing practice. In addition to a single room, which doubles as your private studio, you will be surrounded by a community of artistic peers. You will have the opportunity to attend inspiring talks and performances and meet with guest faculty to consult on your work.

 What does the program offer?

This self-directed residency offers the opportunity to work away from the constraints of everyday life. Delve deep into your creative project and take advantage of the artistic community of your peers around you. The program provides opportunities for consultations with guest mentors, and optional group sessions led by guest mentors that allow writers to explore literary tools, aspects, and devices that you may find useful in your practice. You may also sign up for additional walks and day trips within Banff National Park as well as campus-wide activities organized by our Participant Resources team. 

This flexible program allows you to choose the amount of support you are looking for. All program elements are optional. Participants can request to extend their stay. Mentorship will not be offered during extended stays. These requests will be approved based on availability of accommodation (additional fees will apply).

Who should apply?

Writers in all creative genres are invited to apply. The program is designed for emerging and established writers with a proven publication record seeking a period of dedicated time to work on a project in any genre. We welcome writers from all backgrounds, and all gender identities and expressions.

 FEES & FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

·         Program Fee (Single Room): $2 218.22

·         Application fee: $65

Help fund your experience at Banff Centre! View a compiled list of external national and international opportunities here. Funding from Banff Centre is not available for this program.

IMPORTANT DATES

·         Application Deadline: April 24, 2019

·         Retreat Dates: July 29 - August 10, 2019

·         Arrival Date: July 28, 2019

·         Depart Date: August 11, 2019

banffcentre.ca/programs/summer-writers-retreat-2019/20190729?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=2019-q4-literary-arts-arts-ad-summer-writers-retreat&fbclid=IwAR11Tf01ap5nUFV71gOfm2ZEPZa12AlTQeBYeEv3vLxHoOhu0PA4iV2llb0

 

BETHANY ARTS CENTER RESIDENCY

INFO: Bethany Arts Community offers residencies to emerging and established artists for the development of both new works and works in progress. Bethany welcomes artists working across most disciplines, including visual artists in any medium, writers, playwrights, choreographers, musicians, composers, performance artists, filmmakers, and lighting, projection, costume and sound designers. Enjoy an environment where artists from different disciplines can work near each other, creating opportunities for cross-pollination.

Artists may apply for residencies of 1-4 weeks during the Fall session: September 15 - October 26

ELIGIBILITY: Successful applicants are typically mid-career or established artists. However, emerging artists who believe their work is of exceptional merit are eligible as well. We accept applications from individual artists and small groups of up to 4 members.

Bethany residencies come with two important requirements: 
(1) All residents must attend shared evening meals with their fellow artists. 
(2) All residencies must include a public component accessible to the outside community. This may include open studio visits, presentations, teaching a class/workshop, works-in-progress showing, exhibition, or other outreach or community engagement project. Bethany will work with you to schedule and craft your public component.
You must be at least 21 years old to apply. You may only apply to one subsidized residency program at BAC per year.

Applications are reviewed by a panel of staff and working artists.
All of BAC’s programs, activities, and services are provided equally without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability.

Bethany Arts Community consists of a 44,000 sq ft building situated on 25 verdant acres with both sprawling lawns, orchard, and wooded trails. The wooded trail includes numerous outdoor spaces suitable for developing works, presentation, or installations. The building includes dance studios, galleries, a former-chapel performance venue, and numerous nooks and crannies waiting to be activated by you!

Artists receive:
- comfortable housing in single dorms on BAC’s top floor (groups may be housed in dorms or shared apartments)
- 3 meals/day;
- assigned studio spaces, if desired; 
- access to BAC’s varied facilities;
- stipend of $150 per week per artist.

Residents will be responsible for the cost of travel, materials, and any additional labor needs.

Artists are also encouraged to consider ways to work in and with BAC’s expansive grounds and our diverse local community. Bethany is proud to be in a Town where over half the population are people of color and recent immigrants. 

IMPORTANT DATES:

·         Deadline: April 30, 2019

·         Notifications: May15, 2019 

https://bethanyarts.org/residencies/#call-for-entries

  

LUCILLE CLIFTON CREATIVE PARENT WRITING AWARD

Raising Mothers

INFO: Raising Mothers is honored to host the inaugural Lucille Clifton Creative Parent Writing Award in creative nonfiction. This contest is open to writer mothers of color and NBPOC parent writers only.  

Every Spring an author of a work of creative nonfiction will be selected for the Lucille Clifton Creative Parent Writing Award. The winning submissions will be published in Raising Mothers.

Creative nonfiction authors are invited to submit an essay of up to 1,200 words on the subject of their choice in the Love/Relationships department under the theme, “After Birth Battle” to be considered for the Lucille Clifton Creative Parent Writing Award. 

Please note that previously published work will not be accepted. Authors may submit multiple essays if they are each accompanied by a separate reading fee.

Do not put your name on your essay. For Word documents please leave your name off the submitted work. Your name will be attached to the submission when you submit, but the document shouldn’t have your name.

All submissions for the award will be considered for publication in Raising Mothers. Finalists will receive an honorable mention accompanying their published essay and six months of Mother Mail.

Results are announced in April on our website and published in writer’s magazines online.

AWARD: Winners will receive $100 and their work will be featured on Raising Mothers. They will also have a short interview with a Senior Editor. Each award recipient must submit a 100-word biography, and a current photo.

SUBMISSION FEE: $10 

DEADLINE: April 30, 2019

raisingmothers.com/contests/lcwc/?fbclid=IwAR0ZwoERwrcLmMADrHtsO8oGgLB8xFanTruJVGmWrN2Yasi8134tyKxb5tI

  

THE BELLAGIO CENTER ARTS & LITERARY ARTS RESIDENCY 

INFO: The Bellagio Arts & Literary Arts residency is for composers, fiction and non-fiction writers, playwrights, poets, video/filmmakers, dancers, musicians, and visual artists who share in the Foundation’s mission of promoting the well-being of humankind and whose work is inspired by or relates to global or social issues. The residency is for artists seeking time for disciplined work, reflection, and collegial engagement with a diverse community of academics, practitioners, and artists.

The Center has a strong interest in proposals that align with The Rockefeller Foundation’s efforts to promote the well-being of humanity, particularly through issues that have a direct impact on the lives of poor and vulnerable populations around the world. These issues include but are not limited to health, economic opportunity, urban resilience, as well as food and agriculture.

To most effectively integrate the important voice of the arts throughout residency cohorts at the Bellagio Center, we are now holding one annual open call for residencies. The program will continue to welcome the same volume of high caliber artists to Bellagio, reinforcing the Foundation’s commitment to the arts and demonstrating its perspective that the arts are integral to the discourse around complex global challenges and critical to the well-being of humanity.

To further strengthen the reach of the program and ensure high geographic and disciplinary diversity among residents, we are also working with a range of new arts organizations to surface promising candidates. We have established outreach collaborations with four organizations: Khoj International Artists’ Association in Delhi, Fundacion Jumex in Mexico City, Africa Centre in Cape Town, and United States Artists in Chicago. These collaborations will extend our networks to attract a greater number of geographically diverse, highly distinguished artists working in Asia, Latin America, Africa and the United States. 

DEADLINE: May 1, 2019 

rockefellerfoundation.org/our-work/bellagio-center/residency-program/arts-literary-arts-residency/

 

TIN HOUSE SUMMER RESIDENCY

INFO: The inaugural Tin House Summer Residency is intended to support an author working on their second or third book after having already published a full-length debut. With our summer and winter workshops continuing to support emerging writers, this residency aims to give authors the time, space, and financial flexibility to continue cultivating their voice while taking new artistic risks on their next manuscript.

The Summer Writer-in-Resident will be provided a fully furnished one-bedroom apartment in Portland, Oregon for the month of August and will be provided with a $1000 living stipend towards air travel and food. The resident will also have the option to teach a one-day Craft Intensive during their stay. Our Craft Intensives, which feature no more than twelve students and last for three hours, combine close readings, discussions, and in-class writing. For this, we pay the resident an additional $600.

Tin House will also offer the resident an opportunity to read publicly with local authors.

Other than these optional activities, the principal responsibility of the resident will be to spend time further developing their manuscript.

SUBMISSION FEE: $30

 IMPORTANT DATES

  • Deadline: May 1, 2019

  • Winner Awarded: May 17, 2019

tinhouse.com/workshop/summer-residency/?fbclid=IwAR3eZoN327_dQQnxMETnIOUfhwrZSdZ9C-A0uIg9XckNUmKo-WXt_5i2oaY

 

 

 

FICTION / NONFICTION -- MARCH 2019

THE 2019-2020 U.S.-JAPAN CREATIVE ARTISTS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

Japan-United States Friendship Commission

INFO: The Japan U.S. Friendship Commission offers leading contemporary and traditional artists from the United States the opportunity to spend three to five months in Japan through the U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Program.  Artists go as seekers, as cultural visionaries, and as living liaisons to the traditional and contemporary cultural life of Japan.  They also go as connectors who share knowledge and bring back knowledge. Their interaction with the Japanese public and the outlook they bring home provide exceptional opportunities to promote cultural understanding between the United States and Japan.

JUSFC and NEA will support and select up to five collaborative projects of U.S.-Japan artists representative of diverse genres and regions of both countries.  The 2019-20 program is only for collaborative pairs, and not for individual artists. Alumni of the U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Program are encouraged to apply. Please refer to How to Apply for detailed instructions. This is a special, modified program in 2019-2020.

GRANT AWARD:

  • Each collaborative team will receive a $25,000 fellowship award and up to $2,500 for one round trip airline ticket between the United States and Japan.

  • The collaborative team will have one year (July 1, 2019-July 1, 2020) to complete their project. The award may be used for any expenses directly related to the project, including, but not limited to living expenses in Japan, cost of project materials etc.

  • The artists must complete a collaborative work incorporating the vision of the Olympic and Paralympic games to present in Tokyo during the Games in 2020.

  • The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission will collaborate with public and private sector organizations in and around Tokyo to host performances and presentations of the artists’ works.

  • Exhibition sites will be selected depending on the specific project.

REVIEW CRITERIA & SELECTION PROCESS:

The U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Program is extremely competitive; only up to five artists will be  selected for travel to Japan.  In 2019-2020 applicants should anticipate a highly rigorous review of their artistry and should have compelling reasons for wanting to create a captivating piece of art, in collaboration with a Japanese colleague, for the Olympic and Paralympic games. Their work must exemplify the best in U.S. and Japanese arts. Generally, this means that only those artists who have demonstrated expertise and established professional recognition (e.g. awards, featured shows, publications, etc.) in their field either regionally or nationally or who have shown truly exceptional promise at the local level are likely to be competitive. Proficiency in the Japanese language is not required.

Applications will be judged on the following criteria:

  • Clear representation of themes including, diversity and inclusion – “Unity in Diversity”, sustainability, building a better tomorrow, peace and prosperity, and highlighting the unique relationship between Japan and the United States.

  • The artistic excellence of the applicant’s work and artistic merit of the proposed collaboration;

  • The extent to which working in Japan is consistent with the applicant’s artistic vision and would contribute to his or her artistry;

  • The applicant’s potential to contribute to increased cultural understanding and dialogue with Japanese artists and/or the Japanese public;

  • The availability of resources in Japan that are necessary to the artist’s proposed collaboration;

  • Ability to live and work in unfamiliar settings under different conditions

With the assistance of the National Endowment for the Arts, the Japan U.S. Friendship Commission will convene a panel to review applications. The panel will include previous recipients of the U.S.- Japan Creative Artists Program award, as well as other arts professionals with expertise in working with the Olympics and Japanese culture.

ELIGIBILITY:

  • The applicant must be a citizen or permanent resident of the United States and live and work professionally in the United States.

  • All proposals must be collaborations between a U.S. artist (or group of artists) and a Japanese artist who is a citizen or permanent resident of Japan and living and working professionally in Japan.

  • The applicant and their Japanese collaborator must be a professional creative artists (contemporary or traditional) working as but not limited to: architects, choreographers, musicians, composers, creative writers, designers, media artists, playwrights, librettists, visual artists and  theater artists who work with original material (including puppeteers, and performance artists).

  • The proposed collaborative artistic project must be a new artistic venture, or something that the collaborative team is in the process of developing, and must have a completion date of July 1, 2020.

  • The proposed collaborative artistic project must touch on one or more of themes including, but not limited to, diversity and inclusion – “Unity in Diversity”, sustainability, building a better tomorrow, peace and prosperity.

  • There are additional eligibility requirements for librettists, playwrights, and creative writers (fiction, non-fiction, and poetry) outlined below.

    • Librettists and playwrights must have had a full-length work professionally produced and/or published in the United States at least once in the last five years.

  • Creative writer applicants must meet specific publishing requirements. Self- published work will not satisfy this eligibility requirement. In the last 10 years writers must have published at least one of the following:

    • Twenty poems in five or more literary journals

    • Five different short stories or essays (of creative non-fiction) in two or more literary journals, anthologies, or publications

    • A book of poems of more than 48 pages

    • A novel or a novella

    • A book of creative non-fiction

    • Creative writer applicants may use online publications to establish up to fifty percent of their eligibility, provided that such publications have competitive selection processes and stated editorial policies.

    • The following may not be used to establish eligibility:

      • Pre-publication material, such as galleys, proofs, and advance reader’s

      • Work that has appeared in a publication for which you are the editor, publisher, or staff

      • Collaborative work

      • Scholarly writing including Instructional writing, Book reviews, Editorials/letters to the editor, Student publications and publications that primarily print work by persons who are affiliated with a particular academic institution, any publication by presses that: require individual writers to pay for part or all of the production costs; require writers to buy or sell copies of the publication; publish work without competitive selection or a stated editorial policy; or publish work without professional editing. 

DEADLINE: March 1, 2019

jusfc.gov/creative-artists-programs/

Meeting the Motherland Series

The Lily

INFO: The Lily, a product of The Washington Post for the curious minded and for those who want to be heard, is working on a forthcoming series that explores women’s journeys of visiting their motherland, or ancestral home, for the first time. These stories will address the questions: What is it like to visit the place you come from but know so little about? Does it feel like home? Can it ever feel like home?

We are seeking stories from first- and second-generation American women who feel disconnected from their parents’ or grandparents’ home countries. (For the purpose of this series, first-generation refers to the American-born children of immigrants and second-generation refers to the American-born grandchildren of immigrants.) If you have visited your motherland(s) sometime within the last 2-3 years, only to leave with more questions than answers, we would love to hear your story.

docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfKkuBF-z-8dsKlJfe8treQL_ab1GrhGeDS-yieoFOxhdXFOg/viewform?fbclid=IwAR3y-pKTlNPqDYcN2yU4c21E7zvs9OaZeEY80uJKbxvYfZUyrMp-Pah6LrY

Poetry or Fiction Fellowship

The University of Wisconsin-Madison

INFO: Applications are now open for the WICW Poetry and Fiction Fellowships, awarding stipends of at least $38,000 and generous health benefits. All applications must be received by March 1. Please read our instructions and eligibility requirements, below, before clicking here to upload your application

To be eligible, applicants must have completed or be scheduled to complete an MFA or PhD in Creative Writing by August 15 of the fellowship year. Eligible applicants may have published or signed a contract for no more than one full-length collection or book of poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction as of the March 1 deadline. Individuals who have never published a full-length collection or book remain eligible, of course. Successful applicants must commit to reside in the Madison area for the full duration of the Fellowship from mid-August to mid-May (holiday travel, weekend trips, and attendance of the AWP and/or MLA conferences are of course permitted within reason); to teach one section of undergraduate mixed-genre or single-genre creative writing each semester; to hold no other teaching, graduate study or fellowship obligations; to assist in the selection of the Brittingham and Felix Pollak Prizes in Poetry, the University of Wisconsin’s undergraduate writing prizes, and the following year’s Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing Fellowships; and in general to participate fully in the life of the Madison writing community during the fellowship period. For more details regarding the responsibilities and privileges of our fellows, please see the main fellowships page.

Applicants should prepare the following materials before applying:

  • A $50.00 Application Fee, paid online by credit card.

  • A resume or curriculum vitae, concluding with the names, phone numbers, and email addresses of two recommenders.

  • A writing sample consisting of either 10 pages of poetry (single-spaced and uploaded as a pdf) or up to 30 pages of fiction (double-spaced and uploaded as a pdf). Fiction applications must consist of either one short story or a novel excerpt. Your name must not appear anywhere on your manuscript, and while previously published work may be submitted, your manuscript must in no way indicate that your work has been published.

Do not include more than one genre in a single submission. You may apply in more than one of our fellowship genres, but you must upload a separate application for each, with separate application fees. If you are submitting short fiction, please do not send more than one short story. The limit is one story no matter how short that story may be. If you send more than one story, we will only read the first. If you are sending a novel excerpt you may (but need not) include a brief synopsis (one or two paragraphs) of the novel, as page one of the manuscript.

One of our three poetry fellowships, the First Wave Poetry Fellowship, is reserved for writers with a background teaching social justice and/or performance poetry (e.g. slam or spoken word), or writers with a strong personal background in slam poetry, spoken word poetry, or arts-based social justice activism. As part of the application, poetry candidates will be asked if they meet these qualifications. Applicants who do not meet these qualifications shouldn't worry: you are still very much eligible for the Ron Wallace Poetry Fellowship, and the Jay C. and Ruth Halls Fellowship. 

The poetry and fiction fellows will be chosen by May 1 each year, and announced on the fellows page. If you have questions concerning these fellowships that are not answered in the FAQ below, please contact Sean Bishop, Coordinator of the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, at institutemail@english.

DEADLINE: March 1, 2019

creativewriting.wisc.edu/fellowsapply.html

 

IDA B. WELLS FELLOWSHIP

Type Investigations 

INFO: Named after the pioneering African-American investigative reporter, the Ida B. Wells Fellowship is designed to promote diversity in journalism by helping to create a pipeline of investigative reporters who bring diverse backgrounds, experiences and interests, to their work. Winners are chosen by an annual competition. 

The Ida B. Wells Fellowship provides five reporters each year with a $12,000 stipend, plus $4,000 in bonus payments, and access to a Type Investigations editor who will advise them throughout the process of producing their first substantial work of investigative reporting. The one-year fellowship also covers travel and other reporting costs associated with the project and the costs associated with attending the Investigative Reporters and Editors conference in June, as well as a one-week data bootcamp through the National Institute of Computer Assisted Reporting. Each fellow will also enjoy access to research resources, legal counsel, professional mentoring, fact-checking, and assistance with story placement and publicity. The fellowship is a one-time educational opportunity and is non-renewable.

Journalists of color are strongly encouraged to apply, as are other reporters who believe their presence would contribute substantially to diversifying the field of investigative reporting. The fellowship is open to entry-level or mid-career journalists. Recent journalism school graduates, journalism students or journalism interns are eligible to apply, as are reporters in other fields seeking to pivot to investigative reporting. Applicants may be freelance journalists or journalists currently employed by a media outlet. 

DEADLINE: March 1, 2019 

typemediacenter.submittable.com/submit/71612/ida-b-wells-fellowship

  

Fiction Millay Colony Residency

INFO: The Millay Colony is an artists residency program in Upstate New York. We welcome 6-7 visual artists, writers and composers each month between April and November. We offer a number of flexible residency formats. all including a private bedroom and studio as well as all meals. We welcome artists of all ages, from all cultures and communities, and in all stages of their career. We offer ample time to work in a gorgeous atmosphere, organizing everything an artist needs for maximum productivity.

In each discipline, decisions are made by juries of artists, critics and academics. Your work is presented anonymously to the jury and is considered solely on the merit of your artist statement and work sample. Please keep these factors in mind as you prepare your application. It is very important that you do NOT include your name anywhere on your artist statement or work samples as you may be disqualified if they are within the body of work shown to the jurors. Your application will be assigned a number once it is complete & uploaded to our system. What you will need to prepare before beginning the application process:  

Artist Statement: In a one page Word document, write about your work, yourself and what you’d like to accomplish at Millay Colony as clearly and concisely as possible. The jurors want to get a sense of who you are as a writer and your creative process. This will help in making final decisions. Statement can be single-spaced. Do not include biographical information in your Artist Statement, especially your name or contact info. Doing so could disqualify your application. 

Work Sample: Create a Work Sample of 20 pages or less in manuscript format. Work samples can be work-in-progress or already published work; whatever you feel will make for the strongest application. It can also include several short pieces or sections of writing as long as they do not go over the 20 page limit. You are allowed one additional cover page to explain the context of the writing sample for the jury. Manuscripts must be double spaced, using an 11 or 12 pt. Font. Do not include biographical information in your Work Sample. Make certain your name is not on any of the work sample pages. Combine your Artist Statement and Work Sample into a single document. Make sure the Artist Statement is on page 1 and the Work Sample starts on Page 2. Make sure your name is not anywhere within the body of your work, including the subject box of the document. 

Biographical Statement & Preferred Residency Dates: In this section you can give your biograpical info. Write up to 2 paragraphs listing relevant professional accomplishments such as awards, published works, etc. No CV's please, they will not be considered as a bio statement. Also, tell us how you heard of the Millay Colony. This is for the administrative files and will not be seen by jury members. 

State the top 2-3 months within each of the deadline parameters that you would be best available for a residency. 

APPLICATION FEE: $40

DEADLINE: March 1, 2019

millaycolony.submittable.com/submit/4657/fiction-residency

  

VOICES 2019 EDITOR APPLICATION

Asian American Journalists Association

INFO: Now in its 29th year, Voices is a student fellowship program that provides aspiring journalists with career-ready skills to succeed in the continually-evolving media landscape. At its core, the program’s mission is to help a diverse group of aspiring journalists understand how audiences engage with them, how communities view the work they produce, and how they can understand the impact their work has. By nurturing relationships between students and professional volunteers, Voices also gives students the opportunity to tap into mentors’ networks and begin their own. 

We are looking for journalism professionals who are interested in mentoring our students in their news project over the course of the summer, and who are interested in growing as managers, training students, editing, and helping students network.

The program this year will consist of remote summer-long project work that begins in May and culminates in-person in Atlanta for the AAJA National Convention from Sunday, July 28 to Sunday, August 4. 

As a Voices editor, you will have the opportunity to:  

  • To guide student groups to pitch and produce a long-form story in one of five concentrations. 

  • To learn mentorship, people management, and project management skills 

  • To build lasting relationships not only with your students but other AAJA professionals

  • To attend the AAJA National Convention

The story concentrations this year will be: 

  • Investigative reporting

  • Features

  • Audio

  • Short documentary

  • Other. (This is an open-ended category for students to pitch ideas.) 

Our fellows from last year’s class have gone onto internships and jobs at news companies such as the New York Times, the Washington Post, Frontline, and more. Former Voices students and editors have become Pulitzer Prize-winners, documentarians, public relations professionals, broadcast anchors and newsroom editors. Above all, Voices is a community that lasts far beyond this one summer, a community that students will be a part of for a lifetime. 

DEADLINE: March 10, 2019

aaja.submittable.com/submit/133029/voices-2019-editor-application

THE KEROUAC PROJECT

INFO: The Kerouac Project provides four residencies a year to writers of any stripe or age, living anywhere in the world. In the past we have accepted writers with no formal writing education alongside those with MFA’s and impressive résumés. You will be judged on the quality of the writing sample you submit. Each residency consists of approximately a three month stay in the cottage where Jack Kerouac wrote his novel Dharma Bums. Utilities and a food stipend of $1,000 are included. As writer-in-residence, all you are required to do is live in the Kerouac House during your residency, work on your writing project, and participate in two events—a Welcome Potluck dinner for you, and a Final Reading of your work at the Kerouac House at the end of your residency. Should you desire them, the Kerouac Project can also offer opportunities for you to participate in other readings, lead workshops, and interact in other ways with the vibrant Central Florida literary community.

Residency Slots

Fall 2019: September 1 through November 21, 2019
Winter 2019–2020: December 1, 2019, through February 20, 2020
Spring 2020: March 1 through May 22, 2020
Summer 2020: June 1 through August 21, 2020

At the time you submit your application you will be asked which residency time slot(s) you prefer or are available for. Or you can just indicate ‘any’ if you have no specific time slot preference.

The Application Process:

You will be required to select a category into which your submission fits. The categories are: Poetry, Play, Screenplay, Fiction/Short Story, and Nonfiction. Your writing sample must match the category. So, for example, if you are applying in the fiction category, your writing sample must only be a fiction sample. You cannot include some fiction and some poems you may have written. You are allowed one submission per category. This means you can submit to more than one category if you wish to do so. However, each submission is separate and you must complete the whole application process again for each submission.  

We require a standard format for all prose submissions, fiction and nonfiction. The format is:

  • 10 pages in length.

  • 1-inch page margins.

  • 1.5 line spacing.

  • Text must be in a 12-point serif font, (preferably Times New Roman as its compact structure allows you the maximum number of words per page).

Those submitting poetry, a play, or screenplay, may continue to follow the genre conventions in their submissions, though your writing sample must also be limited to 10-pages in length.

APPLICATION FEE: $35

DEADLINE: March 10, 2019

kerouacproject.org/submissions/

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: FICTION / NONFICTION

Anomaly 

INFO: Anomaly is an international journal of literature and the arts. We provide a platform for works of art that challenge conventions of form and format, of voice and genre. We’re committed to actively seeking out and promoting the work of marginalized and underrepresented artists, including especially people of color, women, queer, disabled, neurodivergent, and gender nonconforming artists. 

Attach one story of no more than 5000 words. Please include a short bio in the "Cover Letter" field.

Translations that foreground the work of the original author are welcome in this category. For translations that foreground the creativity of the translator, please see our Translation section. 

APPLICATION FEE: $3

DEADLINE: March 15, 2019

anmly.submittable.com/submit

 

Sorghum and Spear

The Way of Silk and Stone 

INFO: The tenet, “Pray for Peace but Prepare for War.” is weaved deep into the culture of the An’Fre women. Sorghum & Spear speaks to the global diaspora, African, Latin, Asian and Indigenous. Stories that highlight or reveal a new perspective of fantasy in this rich, inclusive world are ideal. We seek works that explore love in all its forms, diversity, fate vs choice, self-discovery, and supernatural talents, and original works that portray the strength, sisterhood, and diversity of women—hallmarks of our world-building efforts. Given the unique guidelines of our world, we ask that you review Sorghum & Spear and its world-building rules carefully prior to submission. 

Expected Publication: Summer 2019 

Anthologist and Sorghum & Spear Creator: Dedren Snead 

Editor: Sheree Renée Thomas 

ORIGINAL FICTION length: 2000 to 7,500 words 

Payment: 0.06 cents per word + contributor copy 

Genres: Fantasy written with a shared world 

DEADLINE: March 15, 2019 

sorghumandspear.com/anthology-2019?fbclid=IwAR3WW96LhN5eRkYiB_4EAQeWlJbl8M-9wchzQfw92WmXubpKB7ES2LZfX0Y

  

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Sewanee Writers’ Conference 

INFO: We are now accepting applications to the 2019 Sewanee Writers’ Conference! The Conference dates are July 16-28. Faculty will give readings and provide instruction and criticism through workshops and craft lectures, as well as meet individually with participants to discuss their manuscripts. The Conference will offer five fiction workshops, four poetry workshops, a playwriting workshop, and a supplemental poetry translation workshop. An admirable lineup of visiting editors, publishers, and agents will also attend.

This year’s faculty includes fiction writers Jeffery Renard Allen, Tony Earley, Adrianne Harun, Randall Kenan, Michael Knight, Bobbie Ann Mason, Jill McCorkle, Tim O’Brien, Christine Schutt, and Steve Yarbrough; and poets B.H. Fairchild, Robert Hass, Mark Jarman, Maurice Manning, Marilyn Nelson, Mary Jo Salter, A.E. Stallings, and Sidney Wade. Naomi Iizuka and Dan O’Brien will lead the playwriting workshop. Charles Martin, A.E. Stallings, and N.S. Thompson will offer a supplemental poetry translation workshop, and Charles Martin, Alice McDermott, and Wyatt Prunty will read from their work.

The Conference is held on the campus of the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. Thanks to the generosity of the Walter E. Dakin Memorial Fund, supported by the estate of Tennessee Williams, contributors receive assistance covering two-thirds of the actual cost to attend. Additional funding is awarded to fellows and scholars.

 APPLICATION FEE: $0  

DEADLINE: March 20, 2019
sewaneewritersconference.submittable.com/submit

 

VOICES 2019: STUDENT FELLOWSHIP

Asian American Journalists Association

INFO: Now in its 29th year, Voices is a student fellowship program that provides aspiring journalists with career-ready skills to succeed in the continually-evolving media landscape. At its core, the program’s mission is to help a diverse group of aspiring journalists understand how audiences engage with them, how communities view the work they produce, and how they can understand the impact their work has. By nurturing relationships between students and professional volunteers, Voices also gives students the opportunity to tap into mentors’ networks and begin their own.  

This program is open to undergraduate and graduate students interested in journalism. We are looking for students who are interested in spending the summer producing a long-form, in-depth news project over the course of the summer. We want students who are excellent storytellers and who are interested in new technologies and story forms. Reporters, social media strategists, designers, developers, data engineers, podcasters, broadcasters, bloggers are all welcome to apply.

The program this year will consist of remote summer-long training and project work that begins in May and culminates in-person in Atlanta for the AAJA National Convention from Sunday, July 28 to Sunday, August 4.  

As a Voices fellow, students will have the opportunity to: 

  • To create meaningful editorial work by working with student groups to pitch and produce a long-form story in one of five concentrations. 

  • To attend 10 remote trainings throughout the summer led by some of our industry’s leaders.  

  • To build lasting relationships not only with their editors but other AAJA professionals

  • To be a part of the AAJA National Convention not only as attendees, but as presenters. 

  • To meet and interview with recruiters from major news companies 

The story concentrations this year will be: 

  • Investigative reporting

  • Features

  • Audio

  • Short documentary

  • Other: If you have another idea or concentration you are dying to pitch, here is your chance. We cannot guarantee we can support this, but we want to know what you would do if you have the resources at hand. Previous pitches included a VR storytelling project, and a news app leveraging artificial intelligence. 

Our fellows from last year’s class have gone onto internships and jobs at news companies such as the New York Times, the Washington Post, Frontline, and more.  Former Voices students and editors have become Pulitzer Prize-winners, documentarians, public relations professionals, broadcast anchors and newsroom editors. Above all, Voices is a community that lasts far beyond this one summer, a community that students will be a part of for a lifetime. 

ELIGIBILITY

  • Applicants must have a strong commitment to AAJA’s mission.

  • Applicants must be enrolled as a part/full-time college or graduate student or recent graduate (within one year) with a serious interest in pursuing journalism as a career.

  • Applicants must be available during AAJA’s 2019 National Convention in Atlanta the week of July 28-August 4, 2019. There will be additional preparations during the summer.

  • Applicants must be 18 years of age or older.

  • Applicants must not be a former participant in any AAJA Voices or college student projects with similar journalism organizations.

  • AAJA membership is not required to apply; however, accepted students will have to sign up for student membership.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

Before you begin, please make sure you gather all of the information you will need. You will not be able to submit your application without:

  • A letter of recommendation from a supervisor at a journalism internship, a journalism publication advisor or college professor (PDF or JPG only).

  • Three short essays answering the questions below

o   What is one thing you are exceptionally good at, and how does it affect your journalism work at risk?

o   What is one thing you need to improve, and how does it put your journalism work at risk?

o   Other than diversity in hiring and coverage, what is one thing that you think our industry needs to improve or be better at?

  • Your best work samples/portfolio.

  • Your resume 

MORE ABOUT VOICES

Voices is a rare opportunity for college students to develop multimedia and reporting skills in the company of industry professionals from all over the world. Just as newsrooms across the country are adjusting to smaller staffing and new technology, the Asian American Journalists Association (AAJA) has redesigned its student convention program to simulate the convergence newsroom of tomorrow. This innovative opportunity trains students and professionals before and during AAJA’s annual convention.

Written stories, videos, podcasts and digital content will appear on the Voices website. Learn more about Voices and past participants!

DEADLINE: March 24, 2019

aaja.org/apply_for_voices_2019

Lucille Clifton Creative Parent Writing Award

Raising Mothers

INFO: Raising Mothers is honored to host the inaugural Lucille Clifton Creative Parent Writing Award in creative nonfiction.

Every Spring an author of a work of creative nonfiction will be selected for the Lucille Clifton Creative Parent Writing Award. The winning submissions will be published in Raising Mothers and the recipient will receive $100 and be interviewed by a Senior Editor.

DEADLINE: March 31, 2019

http://www.raisingmothers.com/contests/lcwc/?fbclid=IwAR1YHOeEI2e_xb5KlGdYAlgxf_I7Ym83YnbhbIlDbM2kvFSLN3D3P0Lnt0s

JACK JONES LITERARY ARTS RETREAT 2019 

INFO: Jack Jones Literary Arts is hosting its third annual writing retreat at Immaculate Heart of Mary Retreat Center, Santa Fe, New Mexico. This two-week retreat will be held October 26-November 8, 2019, and is open exclusively to women of color writers and nonbinary writers of color. Dr. Eve L. Ewing joins us as our 2019 Writer-in-Residence.

As part of the retreat experience, Jack Jones is featuring daily Skype master classes with agents, editors and acclaimed women and nonbinary people in publishing to promote networking, learning and engagement. These sessions are mandatory for retreat participants.

Housing includes individual writing suites with private bedroom, private baths, writing areas, wifi, and all meals are provided.

Professional and emerging women writers of color and nonbinary writers of color at work on book projects are eligible for residencies. Women and nonbinary people with and without MFAs are eligible, and graduate students who are currently enrolled in a degree program are eligible to apply for a fellowship. 

APPLICATION FEE: $40 

DEADLINE: March 31, 2019

jackjonesliteraryarts.com/the-retreat?fbclid=IwAR26xVBImdMpEytXdXDy7cloMDf7pX0Vvk1JhumUs4-09-HUbkTqFeypRQE

  

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: RECOMMENDED READING

Electric Literature

INFO: Recommended Reading is the weekly fiction magazine of Electric Literature, with over 92,000 subscribers in just five years. Every week, the magazine publishes one story, each chosen by today’s best authors and editors.

The best way to get a sense of the kind of stories we’re looking for is to read the Recommended Reading archives, especially the stories recommended by Electric Literature, in which we showcase original fiction.

We can only consider one story by an author at any given time. We look for stories in the range of 1,500 to 10,000 words; if selected, we can offer a payment of $300. (For fiction shorter than 1,500 words, submit to the Recommended Reading Commuter!) We have a 5- to 8-month response time for stories submitted during the general open periods, and a 3-month response time guarantee for members who may submit year-round.

Recommended Reading launched in May 2012 and has since published over 300 issues, including original work by Sheila Heti, A. Igoni Barrett, A.M. Homes, Helen DeWitt, Jim Shepard, Ben Marcus, Etgar Keret, Cesear Aria, Ottessa Moshfegh, Kelly Link, and Mary Gaitskill. We also pride ourselves in championing new voices, and have been early supporters of writers such as Helen Phillips, Sharma Shields, Rebecca Schiff, Diane Cook, and Matt Sumell.

Recommended Reading is digital-only, available for free online for at least a month, and for $0.99 per issue on Kindle.

SUBMISSION PERIOD: April 1 – 7, 2019 

https://electricliterature.com/submit-ebdd3b73083a?fbclid=IwAR1DOJqf9DRP7jyA6nzRcSgBiFTaNcc-KuZMqPxY27jw1_zLm21beazdR30

 

 Eliza So Fellowship 

INFO: Submittable is delighted to announce its third annual Eliza So Fellowship. In 2019, Submittable will offer two month-long residencies in Missoula, Montana, affording time and solitude to writers finishing a book-length project.

The 2019 fellowships will include lodging in Missoula, along with a $500 food stipend and $400 toward travel. Fellows will stay in a private house on the Clark Fork river trail, just blocks from downtown, grocery shopping, the farmers market, parks, restaurants, coffee shops, and more. 

Submittable will accept applications between January 15 and April 5, 2019, and results will be announced June 3. We’re pleased to offer two residencies (one in August and one in September), awarded in the following categories:

  • The Eliza So Fellowship for Immigrant Writers

  • The Eliza So Fellowship for Native American Writers 

The final judge for the Fellowship for Immigrant Writers will be Marcelo Hernandez Castillo

The final judge for the Fellowship for Native American Writers will be Joan Naviyuk Kane.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:

1) You have a novel, collection of stories, memoir, or other prose work (fiction, nonfiction, or hybrid) in progress (100 pages minimum) or poetry collection in progress (30 pages minimum)  

2) You are either:

  • a US immigrant writer (documented or undocumented)

  • a Native American writer

3) You are available during one or both of the following periods:

  • August 3 – August 31, 2019

  • September 1 – September 29, 2019.

 PARTICIPATION:

Fellows will be asked to give a public reading in Missoula and write a blog post of at least 1,000 words for Submittable during their residency. 

If fellows are interested in doing a Brown Bag lunchtime presentation for staff at Submittable's Missoula headquarters during their stay—on their book project, craft, or any literary topic that interests them—we would be delighted. However, a Brown Bag presentation is not required.

ABOUT THE FELLOWSHIP:

This fellowship was named in honor of Eliza So, the mother of Submittable’s Head of People Asta So. Eliza immigrated to the US from Hong Kong in 1982, with her husband and two daughters. She worked in administrative and housekeeping jobs in the San Francisco Bay Area for many years. At age 58, she began showing signs of dementia, and she was diagnosed with early onset of Alzheimer’s in 2012. She is one of the kindest, warmest, and most hard-working people you could meet, and we pay tribute to her life and legacy with this opportunity.

DEADLINE: April 5, 2019

fellowship.submittable.com/submit

FICTION / NONFICTION -- FEBRUARY 2019

LITERARY AND PHOTOGRAPHIC CONTEST

Hispanic Culture Review

INFO: Part of the human condition is the guarantee that at some point of our lives we will be confronted by obstacles. These can occur because of innumerable circumstances produced by internal or external factors like literal or metaphorical borders, personal or social catastrophes, challenges created by identity differences, and more. However, the drive to overcome is inherent in people and tenacity is part of the character that makes us human. The processes with which we face obstacles and victory is declared over them hold an individual seal. This year we are looking to publish stories that demonstrate the overcoming of obstacles that have left a personal mark in the life of those who have prevailed over the difficulties they have faced.

Three works will be awarded in the following categories: photography and visual arts, poetry, narrative, and essay and academic investigation. 

The selected works will be published in our magazine, and the winners will receive a monetary prize of $100 dollars and a certificate of recognition, and will be notified through email as well as on our Facebook page (Hispanic Culture Review GMU). Prizes will be issued in the Spring of 2019.  

GUIDELINES: For a work to be considered, the following specifications must be followed; if the specifications are not followed, the work will be eliminated:

  • The maximum number of works per author is 2, which must be sent as separate files. Those submitting photography and visual arts works are allowed to send up to 6 works.

  • Written works must be written in Arial 12pt font.

  • Academic works and essays must follow the current MLA or APA formatting style.

  • Maximum length allowed for the texts:

  • Academic essays and investigations: 3000 words (including footnotes).

  • Narrative: 2500 words.

  • Poetry: 50 lines maximum.

  • Visual Arts: photographs must be in JPEG format and 300 PPI.

  • Only unedited work will be accepted, which means works that have not been published before or are pending revision in other media. This includes printed and electronic work, as well as those included in literary blogs.

  • Works written in both English and Spanish will be accepted.

  • There are no age or nationality restrictions to participate, except in the case that the person has his/her fiscal residence in any of the countries subject to the sanctions of the United States government, since it would be impossible to send the monetary prize to the winner. https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/sanctions/Programs/Pages/Programs.aspx 

Selected works will be published in both the print and electronic versions of the HCR magazine. HCR reserves the right to publish the works exclusively in its digital version. 

Contact us with questions at hcr@gmu.edu

DEADLINE: Friday, February 1, 2019 

hispanicculturereview.submittable.com/submit

 

CREATIVE WRITING FELLOWSHIP

Luminarts Cultural Foundation

INFO: The Creative Writing Fellowship awards two $7,500 Luminarts Fellowships for excellence in creative writing in the categories of prose and poetry, in fiction and nonfiction.  

Applicants submit a two-page written piece (either a stand-alone piece or an excerpt of a larger piece such as a novel or short story). Entries are submitted and reviewed by an initial panel of jurors. Once reviewed, all top entries go to the final juror panel and the winners are selected. Jurors are comprised of professional authors, novelists, and poets, literary contributors, publishers, editors, journalists and media contributors.  Click below for complete guidelines and to apply. 

GUIDELINES: In order to be eligible to apply for the Luminarts Fellowship applicants must be between the ages of 18 and 30, live within 150 miles of the Chicago Loop, and be enrolled in, or graduated from, a degree program, conservatory, or other professional artist development program.  

DEADLINE: Friday, February 8, 2019 

https://luminarts.org/creative-writing-opportunities/

 

LIGHTHOUSE WORKS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

INFO: Lighthouse Works offers residencies to visual artists, writers, and composers who are at the vanguard of their creative fields. The six-week fellowship provides housing, meals, a $1,500 stipend, and studio space.

 While our staff reviews applications for completeness, a jury of experts in each artist’s field evaluates the applications and identifies the finalists. Finalists will be invited for phone interviews, and all applicants will be informed of the committee’s decision by the notification date for the relevant application period.

SUBMISSION FEE: $25

DEADLINE: February 15, 2019

thelighthouseworks.com/apply/ 

 

KWELI 2019 SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION

INFO: We are excited beyond measure about the Kweli Color of Children's Literature Conference on Saturday, April 6, 2019! We had an amazing conference last year, and #Kweli19 promises to be an even more exciting, educational, and community-building day for IPOC creatives.

Thanks to the generosity of our amazing donors, we are able to offer a limited number of scholarships to attend the Kweli Color of Children's Literature Conference!  

You can submit ONE application for our review and consideration. Please note that the scholarship covers the cost of registration. It does NOT cover travel or the costs of a master class or manuscript / portfolio review.  

For details on the conference, please see the following link: http://www.kwelijournal.org/the-color-of-childrens-literature-conference-3/

Questions? Contact Laura at editors@kwelijournal.org.

DEADLINE: February 16, 2019

docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeemnhMbkuOoCRN10lV-cDYeQ7weNm9itPsJCtGn7pLdiv1vg/viewform?fbclid=IwAR1mYZ0R3zXoz-TIz0ffLZbnH20eWC5nsVa-FvbeFCC3URGVzfs6bKJ8knk

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSION: CREATIVE NONFICTION

Apogee

INFO: Apogee is a journal of literature and art that engages with identity politics, including but not limited to: race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and intersectional identities. Our goals are twofold: to publish fresh work that interrogates the status quo, and to provide a platform for underrepresented voices, prioritizing artists and writers of color.

GUIDELINES:

  • We generally do not publish prose of more than 5,000 words. 

  • Please submit in either .doc, .docx, or .pdf format. 

  • Please send only one piece per reading period.

  • All work must be previously unpublished.

  • Cover letters are optional.

  • Please include a current bio.

  • We accept simultaneous submissions. Please notify us if your work has been accepted elsewhere. 

DEADLINE: February 18, 2019

apogeejournal.submittable.com/submit  

 

[Call for Submissions] TRANS:ACT with the Transpacific Literary Project

Asian American Writers’ Workshop

TRANS:ACT
an action-based writing prompt to explore and subvert the languages of exchange and value. Here are the simple rules: 

1. Go to your local market and listen/ record/ take notes on what is said (and unsaid).

2. Make a piece of writing inspired by this language.

3. In your writing, be sure to include one item you purchase from the market and the price you pay for it. 

Because this folio of the Transpacific Literary Project will be thinking about the relationship of market transaction and language, we welcome submissions in all regional languages (as well as English). And to encourage critical play with such marketplace language, we welcome attempts at self-translation using any available means, with notes to supplement when equivalency is not possible.

As a cover letter for your submission, you will be asked to briefly introduce yourself and your marketplace.

DEADLINE: February 18, 2019 

aaww.org/call-for-submissions-transact-with-the-transpacific-literary-project/

 

The 2019-2020 U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Fellowship Program

Japan-United States Friendship Commission

INFO: The Japan U.S. Friendship Commission offers leading contemporary and traditional artists from the United States the opportunity to spend three to five months in Japan through the U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Program.  Artists go as seekers, as cultural visionaries, and as living liaisons to the traditional and contemporary cultural life of Japan.  They also go as connectors who share knowledge and bring back knowledge. Their interaction with the Japanese public and the outlook they bring home provide exceptional opportunities to promote cultural understanding between the United States and Japan.

JUSFC and NEA will support and select up to five collaborative projects of U.S.-Japan artists representative of diverse genres and regions of both countries.  The 2019-20 program is only for collaborative pairs, and not for individual artists. Alumni of the U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Program are encouraged to apply. Please refer to How to Apply for detailed instructions. This is a special, modified program in 2019-2020.

GRANT AWARD:

  • Each collaborative team will receive a $25,000 fellowship award and up to $2,500 for one round trip airline ticket between the United States and Japan.

  • The collaborative team will have one year (July 1, 2019-July 1, 2020) to complete their project. The award may be used for any expenses directly related to the project, including, but not limited to living expenses in Japan, cost of project materials etc.

  • The artists must complete a collaborative work incorporating the vision of the Olympic and Paralympic games to present in Tokyo during the Games in 2020.

  • The Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission will collaborate with public and private sector organizations in and around Tokyo to host performances and presentations of the artists’ works.

  • Exhibition sites will be selected depending on the specific project.

REVIEW CRITERIA & SELECTION PROCESS:

The U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Program is extremely competitive; only up to five artists will be  selected for travel to Japan.  In 2019-2020 applicants should anticipate a highly rigorous review of their artistry and should have compelling reasons for wanting to create a captivating piece of art, in collaboration with a Japanese colleague, for the Olympic and Paralympic games. Their work must exemplify the best in U.S. and Japanese arts. Generally, this means that only those artists who have demonstrated expertise and established professional recognition (e.g. awards, featured shows, publications, etc.) in their field either regionally or nationally or who have shown truly exceptional promise at the local level are likely to be competitive. Proficiency in the Japanese language is not required.

Applications will be judged on the following criteria:

  • Clear representation of themes including, diversity and inclusion – “Unity in Diversity”, sustainability, building a better tomorrow, peace and prosperity, and highlighting the unique relationship between Japan and the United States.

  • The artistic excellence of the applicant’s work and artistic merit of the proposed collaboration;

  • The extent to which working in Japan is consistent with the applicant’s artistic vision and would contribute to his or her artistry;

  • The applicant’s potential to contribute to increased cultural understanding and dialogue with Japanese artists and/or the Japanese public;

  • The availability of resources in Japan that are necessary to the artist’s proposed collaboration;

  • Ability to live and work in unfamiliar settings under different conditions

With the assistance of the National Endowment for the Arts, the Japan U.S. Friendship Commission will convene a panel to review applications. The panel will include previous recipients of the U.S.- Japan Creative Artists Program award, as well as other arts professionals with expertise in working with the Olympics and Japanese culture.

ELIGIBILITY:

  • The applicant must be a citizen or permanent resident of the United States and live and work professionally in the United States.

  • All proposals must be collaborations between a U.S. artist (or group of artists) and a Japanese artist who is a citizen or permanent resident of Japan and living and working professionally in Japan.

  • The applicant and their Japanese collaborator must be a professional creative artists (contemporary or traditional) working as but not limited to: architects, choreographers, musicians, composers, creative writers, designers, media artists, playwrights, librettists, visual artists and  theater artists who work with original material (including puppeteers, and performance artists).

  • The proposed collaborative artistic project must be a new artistic venture, or something that the collaborative team is in the process of developing, and must have a completion date of July 1, 2020.

  • The proposed collaborative artistic project must touch on one or more of themes including, but not limited to, diversity and inclusion – “Unity in Diversity”, sustainability, building a better tomorrow, peace and prosperity.

  • There are additional eligibility requirements for librettists, playwrights, and creative writers (fiction, non-fiction, and poetry) outlined below.

    • Librettists and playwrights must have had a full-length work professionally produced and/or published in the United States at least once in the last five years.

  • Creative writer applicants must meet specific publishing requirements. Self- published work will not satisfy this eligibility requirement. In the last 10 years writers must have published at least one of the following:

    • Twenty poems in five or more literary journals

    • Five different short stories or essays (of creative non-fiction) in two or more literary journals, anthologies, or publications

    • A book of poems of more than 48 pages

    • A novel or a novella

    • A book of creative non-fiction

    • Creative writer applicants may use online publications to establish up to fifty percent of their eligibility, provided that such publications have competitive selection processes and stated editorial policies.

    • The following may not be used to establish eligibility:

      • Pre-publication material, such as galleys, proofs, and advance reader’s

      • Work that has appeared in a publication for which you are the editor, publisher, or staff

      • Collaborative work

      • Scholarly writing including Instructional writing, Book reviews, Editorials/letters to the editor, Student publications and publications that primarily print work by persons who are affiliated with a particular academic institution, any publication by presses that: require individual writers to pay for part or all of the production costs; require writers to buy or sell copies of the publication; publish work without competitive selection or a stated editorial policy; or publish work without professional editing. 

DEADLINE: March 1, 2019

jusfc.gov/creative-artists-programs/

FICTION / NONFICTION -- JANUARY 2019

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: THE TRAVEL ISSUE

YES! Magazine

For a lot of lucky people, warm weather and vacation from work mean travel. Sometimes short trips nearby, sometimes big adventures to other countries. Those experiences are important not just for our personal happiness—a break from daily routines—but for societal growth. Imagination, inspiration, perspective, empathy—so much about work to build a better world depends on exposure to other ways of being, experiencing other people, places, and cultures. Social justice depends on how we travel.

There has been a lot of progress in increasing understanding of travel’s carbon footprint. But in our summer travel issue, we would like to look at solutions and analyses that take into account: Racial justice. Feminism. Exotification. Poverty, inequality, and access. Segregation. Colonial mindsets. Rights of underdeveloped countries. Rights of nature.

Who gets to travel? Tourism tends to benefit wealthy people, both those doing the visiting and the capitalists in the places being visited. Even at the city level, one of the consequences of poverty and inequality is not being able to leave the city to experience wilderness or cultural spaces. If you charge more to travel, with carbon offsets and the actual costs of travel, then you increase the inequality of cultural access. If you make it less expensive, it often becomes unsustainable. Is there way out to break out of the market forces? How do we democratize travel?

What is a fair exchange? Traditional global tourism tends to be extractive—think African safaris and cruise ships destroying reefs. In the urge to find authentic experiences, technology such as the camera phone have changed the way people of other cultures experience tourists. If travel and tourism are socially and economically important, how can it be done in fair and socially conscious ways? Does mixing volunteerism with travel work?

Outdoor travel: “Wilderness” historically has meant pristine places set aside for White people to experience. The national parks and monuments have a history of racism. What are they doing to increase cultural access, and is it working? Significantly, is it working for the Indigenous people whose traditional lands these are? 

Alternative economies: Capitalism fosters an exploitive industry, and studies show tourism exacerbates income inequality. Are there ways to do cultural exchange outside traditional economies, such as the Eatwith platform or grassroots home exchanges?

Your own backyard: America is large and multicultural, but Americans don’t often value touring their own cultures. A recent study shows travel within American cities is segregated and limited. Segregation and confinement breed fear, and economic and political polarization, as in the rural-urban divide, as in White-only neighborhoods and Black-only neighborhoods. How do we encourage everyone to move freely and fully experience their own cities? How do we get citizens to venture out of their own comfortable spaces?

How to get there? Fast travel is bad for the planet, and many tours try to address issues of sustainability. What are the best ways to get far away yet do the least harm? Less expensive can often mean more unsustainable. What are the actual costs of travel?

Expat or migrant? What is our right to travel? Limiting travel at all steps on personal freedom. When we differentiate tourism from travel, then the discussion about the right to move freely is one that involves migration, global citizenship, and segregated cities. Empowerment comes from freedom to imagine a better world for yourself, to pick up and find a better place. Yet even temporary migration is viewed with suspicion and disdain when it involves people from poor countries. When it’s an American or a European trying on a new country, they’re enviable expats. Is racism the only root of the difference? 

YES! Magazine wants to know how individuals and communities are solving some of these problems.

Send us your story ideas! We seek examples of excellent journalism: character-driven and place-based storytelling. Your story will be well-researched and demonstrate conflict and resolution in the form of a reported feature, explanatory analysis, or insightful essay. Send pitches to travelissue@yesmagazine.org.

DEADLINE: January 31, 2019

yesmagazine.org/peace-justice/call-for-submissions?fbclid=IwAR1O602bPCVQch3LaQRU-UN0rRAD3I0lHeRiyGYqTdsdTKib9k_F758G72o

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: FICTION

The Acentos Review 

INFO: The Acentos Review, a journal committed to publishing the work of Latinx artists and writers, seeks work for its Pop! Culture issue. 

Submit 1 piece of fiction of 500 - 7500 words and cover letter. All forms, themes, and styles are accepted.

Include a brief bio (100 words) in your cover letter. 

In addition, please write a one line response to the following prompt: To me, being Latinx means ... Responses can be up to 100 words. 

acentosreview.submittable.com/submit/1775/fiction

  

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: NON-FICTION

The Acentos Review

INFO: The Acentos Review, a journal committed to publishing the work of Latinx artists and writers, seeks work for its Pop! Culture issue.

Submit 1 nonfiction piece of 500 - 2000 words with a cover letter. The Acentos Review is open to the submission of all categories of nonfiction including creative and memoir. 

Include a brief bio (100 words) in your cover letter. 

In addition, please write a one line response to the following prompt: To me, being Latinx means ... Responses can be up to 100 words 

REVIEWS 
We love reviews and always need more of them. They can be approached as academic tangos with the text or intimate exchanges of anecdotes over candlelight. Reviews of 1000 – 1500 words are preferred about books by Latin@ authors or about issues concerning the Latin@ community. 

INTERVIEWS 
We encourage interviews with Latin@ writers from across the globe. Interviews may be conducted in English or Spanish. Authors chosen to be interviewed should have published at least one book and/or contributed to the community of Latin@ writers in some way. We encourage authors to query first at acentosreview@gmail.com. 1000-1500 words preferred.  

acentosreview.submittable.com/submit/1776/nonfiction-reviews-and-interviews

FICTION / NONFICTION -- NOVEMBER 2018

BLUE MOUNTAIN CENTER RESIDENCY

INFO: Blue Mountain Center accepts applications from writers, artists of all media types, activists, and composers who create original work. They value racial, economic and environmental justice and gender equality and encourage applications from people of color, women and LGBTQ artists and activists.

APPLICATION OPENS: November 1, 2018

bluemountaincenter.org/dates-and-guidelines/

  

2019 PEN/Robert J. Dau Short Story Prize for Emerging Writers

INFO: The PEN/Robert J. Dau Short Story Prize for Emerging Writers each year recognizes twelve emerging fiction writers for their debut short story published during a given calendar year in a literary magazine or cultural website and aims to support the launch of their careers as fiction writers. 

Each of the twelve winning writers will receive a cash purse of $2,000 and will be honored at the annual PEN Literary Awards Ceremony in New York City. The independent book publisher Catapult will publish the twelve winning stories in an annual anthology entitled The PEN America Best Debut Short Stories.

 DEADLINE: November 10, 2018

pen.submittable.com/submit/117325/2019-pen-robert-j-dau-short-story-prize-for-emerging-writers-2-000-to-12-write

 

DIVERSE VOICES OPEN INBOX

Harper Collins 

INFO: We believe in sharing powerful, thought-provoking, and entertaining stories that offer inclusive perspectives of the world. That’s why we’ve launched the Diverse Voices Open Inbox contest, an opportunity for writers from diverse backgrounds, with an emphasis on #ownvoices, to submit their work!

 We are looking for literature for middle grade audiences (ages 8-12) in any genre or format* 

PRIZE: One (1) Grand Prize winner will receive the following:

  • Editorial feedback from a panel of HarperCollins editors in writing, including an edit letter and a thirty-minute phone consultation.

  • Consideration for publication by the HarperCollins Children’s Books’ acquisitions group. 

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: November 16, 2018

  • Winner Announced: April 16, 2019

harpercollins.com/childrens/diverse-voices-open-inbox/?fbclid=IwAR3qXyMzmY-pYaEqnzU8ExyZKkF1X9Dt9JY9mEnYGva9v6O-bwLeOR-0fUw

 

GOOGLE PODCAST CREATOR PROGRAM

Google Podcasts / PRI 

INFO: Google Podcasts creator program is an accelerator program developed to lower barriers to podcasting and increase the diversity of voices in the industry globally. Selected teams will receive seed funding and participate in an intensive 20-week training program.

There will be two training cohorts, each consisting of six teams (of two to three members per team). Applications for the second cohort will open in April 2019. 

PRX is accepting applications only through this website. Please read all of the application material carefully. We strongly recommend reading the FAQ thoroughly before you start the application.  

This is an open application process. PRX representatives and members of the Google Podcasts creator program Advisory Committee will select the teams once the application period is closed. 

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: November 18, 2018 at 11:59pm ET

  • Teams Announced: December 11, 2018

prx.submittable.com/submit/6b212cf9-86af-4534-8619-b7f00220739c/apply-to-google-podcasts-creator-program

 

30 Below Contest—2018

 INFO: Narrative invites all writers, poets, visual artists, photographers, performers, and filmmakers between eighteen and thirty years old to send us their best work. We’re looking for the traditional and the innovative, the true and the imaginary. We’re looking to encourage and promote the best young authors and artists working today.

Works of prose and of poetry, including short stories, all poetic forms, novel excerpts, essays, memoirs, and excerpts from book-length nonfiction. Prose submissions must not exceed 15,000 words. Each poetry submission may contain up to five poems. The poems should all be contained in a single file. All submissions should be double-spaced, with 12-point type, at least one-inch margins, and sequentially numbered pages. Please provide your name, address, telephone number, and email address at the top of the first page. Submit your document as a .doc, .docx, .pdf, or .rtf file. You may enter as many times as you wish, but we encourage you to be selective and to send your best work. All entries will be considered for publication.

AWARDS:

  • First Prize is $1,500

  • Second Prize is $750

  • Third Prize is $300

  • Ten finalists will receive $100 each. 

ENTRY FEE: $25 fee for each entry. And with your entry, you’ll receive three months of complimentary access to Narrative Backstage.

DEADLINE:  November 18, 2018, at midnight PT

 narrativemagazine.com/30-below-2018?uid=103566&m=cca98b44ab7084d998e5589a076bc9e2&d=1539185023

  

Fall 2018 Story Contest

 INFO: OUR FALL CONTEST is open to all fiction and nonfiction writers. We’re looking for short shorts, short stories, essays, memoirs, photo essays, graphic stories, all forms of literary nonfiction, and excerpts from longer works of both fiction and nonfiction. Entries must be previously unpublished, no longer than 15,000 words, and must not have been previously chosen as a winner, finalist, or honorable mention in another contest.

AWARDS:

  • First Prize is $2,500

  • Second Prize is $1,000

  • Third Prize is $500

  • Up to ten finalists will receive $100 each

 SUBMISSION FEE: There is a $26 fee for each entry. With your entry, you’ll receive three months of complimentary access to Narrative Backstage.

DEADLINE:  November 30, 2018, at midnight PT

narrativemagazine.com/fall-2018-story-contest?uid=103566&m=cf6d0f5b3dcb4f325254bccdeaf43db8&d=1536275654

 

TOFTE LAKE RESIDENCY: EMERGING ARTISTS PROGRAM
Tofte Lake Center

INFO: TLC is sponsoring its 10th annual Emerging Artists Program which enables both individual creative artists and a group of artists to focus on their current work. This program subsidizes one 2-week residency for 7 emerging artists and/or 2 person creative teams from the Minnesota and the 5 boroughs of New York, and one week-long residency for a group project that would have exclusive use of the facilities. Please note that applicants must live in either MN or one of the 5 NYC boroughs to be eligible to apply. 

The residencies at TLC are intentionally interdisciplinary in nature. Artists from many disciplines can apply. Disciplines may include: playwriting, poetry, prose writing, painting, music composition, and dance. We would be happy to accept applicants who sculpt, produce films, are photographers, work with crafts; we are, however, more limited in terms of the materials we can provide. The underlying philosophy is to provide space and means of support for individual artists wishing to further their creative endeavors in the visual, literary and performing arts. The dramaturgical assistance of TLC director Liz Engelman is available if desired. 

Individual/Creative Residency: Each artist from MN will receive an honorarium, meal, and travel stipend of $1,600, and each artist from NYC will receive $2,000. 

Group Residency: Each artist will receive and honorarium, meal, and travel stipend of $1,000.

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: November 30, 2018

  • Individual Artist/Creative Team Residency: July 15-28, 2019.

  • Group Project Week: August 12-18, 2019.

https://toftelake.org/emerging-artists

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

The Bare Life Review

INFO: The Bare Life Review is pleased to accept unsolicited manuscripts in fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. Your cover letter should list the type of submission, a rough word count (or line count, in the case of poetry), and include a short bio.

The Bare Life Review does not consider proposals or queries. Please submit completed work only.

Please note that our rates have changed: We now offer $750 for accepted full-length prose pieces, and $300 for accepted poems or shorter prose. This small reduction will allow us to publish more authors, and to expand our online presence.

ELIGIBILITY:

We are committed to publishing work exclusively by immigrant and refugee authors, and to showcasing the immense—indeed, infinite—value and diversity of this literature. To this end, we accept work only from:

  • Foreign-born writers living in the United States

  • Writers living abroad who currently hold refugee and/or asylum-seeker status

While we enjoy and value the work of native-born writers—including the children of immigrants—we do not publish it, and ask that you respect the journal's guidelines in this respect. We cannot, and do not wish to subject our writers to an interrogation as to their origins; we depend upon the good faith of those submitting work to maintain and further the journal's mission.

The Bare Life Review welcomes work in translation. Any writers not working in English, who have not yet secured translation of their work, may contact TBLR via email. In some cases we may be able to help find a translator.

American-born translators may submit work by eligible writers, but in such cases payment must be issued to the author.

Submissions will be judged solely on artistic grounds. Your work may, but need not, deal explicitly with issues of immigration, exile, or refuge. 

DEADLINE: November 31, 2018 

barelifereview.org/submit 

 
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
VOICES OF THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

Nimrod International Journal

INFO: For our Spring/Summer 2019 issue, Voices of the Middle East and North Africa, Nimrod International Journal invites poems, short stories, creative nonfiction pieces, and translations from writers from the Middle East and North Africa, including writers currently living in this region, writers from the region currently living abroad, and writers of Middle Eastern and North African heritage. 

With this issue, we seek to celebrate writers and writing from this region, to highlight the diverse cultures and people within it, and to enrich and add complexity to the representation and understanding of the Middle East and North Africa. It is often spoken of as if it were one homogeneous swath of the globe, and indeed, less than 1% of Arabic and Persian literature is translated into English, further adding to this perceived sameness. But it is in fact a collection of countries straddling three continents, all with diverse cultures and histories, with similarities and distinct differences—and it is this richness and diversity of thought and culture that we wish to call attention to in this issue. We hope to include work by writers in as many of the groups within the region as possible: work by writers who identify as Arab, Israeli, Turkish, Kurdish, Persian, and more; work translated from Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, Berber, and more; and work from writers of the many faiths practiced in the region, as well as those who follow no particular faith. 

We invite poems, short stories, creative nonfiction pieces, and translations from writers from the Middle East and North Africa (sometimes known as MENA or WANA for short), including writers currently living in this region, writers from the region currently living abroad, and writers of Middle Eastern and North African heritage (Middle Eastern-Americans, North African-Canadians, etc.).

Work may be about any subject and, while we certainly welcome work about, for example, the idea of the Middle East and/or North Africa as a region; the individual countries and groups within the region; what it means to say “the Middle East”; issues of colonialism in the region; writers’ personal heritage; the work submitted for the issue is not limited to these subjects. We hope to receive a large variety of material for this issue, and we welcome writers of marginalized orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, and writers with physical or mental differences. Most of all, we hope to be surprised.

 We are excited about this issue, so please send your work and/or share this announcement with writing groups, students, and friends. We eagerly anticipate your response.

PAYMENT: $10 per page with a $200 maximum

DEADLINE: December 5th, 2018

nimrodjournal.submittable.com/submit

FICTION / NONFICTION -- OCTOBER 2018

ARTIST RESIDENCY PROGRAM

The Millay Colony

INFO: The Millay Colony is an artists residency program in Upstate New York. We welcome 6-7 visual artists, writers, poets, playwrights, screenwriters, and composers each month between April and November. We offer a number of flexible residency formats. all including a private bedroom and studio as well as all meals. We welcome artists of all ages, from all cultures and communities, and in all stages of their career. We offer ample time to work in a gorgeous atmosphere, organizing everything an artist needs for maximum productivity.

Our seven-acre Upstate New York campus, with its lovely meadows and forest, is adjacent to the former home and gardens of poet Edna St. Vincent Millay and the exquisite Harvey Mountain State Forest. Our residents and guests have access to trails for hiking and bicycles, as well as meadows for picnics (with wild blueberry, wild thyme and a delicious mix of plants and flowers), and creeks and streams for cooling off. In the Winter, residents may choose to go cross-country skiing. We are near the towns of Chatham, NY and Great Barrington, MA.

Our chef cooks healthy delicious dinners and also provides food for residents to cook their own day-time meals. We are happy to respond to food allergies and special diets. We have a barbecue for outdoor grilling and a fire pit for smores.

The Steepletop Barn has four bedrooms and four studios with meadow and mountain views. The Main Building was featured in the July ’98 issue of Architectural Record for its sleek look and commitment to universal access. This building contains two residency suites and studios as well as common areas open to all residents, including the kitchen, dining and living areas, and a laundry room. All are fully accessible. The Main House also has a darkroom, a Yamaha U1 upright piano, a large collection of art books, two lounges, a public telephone, and WiFi. In our adjacent offices, we have a fax machine, copier, computer and printer for residents’s use. 

APPLICATION FEE: $37 

DEADLINE: October 4, 2018 

millaycolony.org/programs/residencies-artists-millay-colony-arts/apply/

FAMILY RESIDENCY

SPACE on Ryder Farm 

INFO: Now in its fifth year, SPACE on Ryder Farm’s Family Residency, founded in association with The Lilly Awards Foundation (spearheaded by Julia Jordan, Marsha Norman and Pia Scala-Zankel), provides a weeklong residency on the farm for working parents and their children. 

The Family Residency offers an artist-parent with structured time to create, while their child(ren) participate in nature-focused arts programming under the guidance and expertise of professional theatre educators. All family residents (parents and children) enjoy three communal farm-fresh meals daily. The residency culminates in short, informal sharings of the work accomplished by both parents and children while in residence at SPACE. 

As of 2018, SPACE welcomes artist-parents with children who are 3 to 12 years of age to apply.

If you are a two-parent/guardian household and both parents wish to participate in the residency, both parents must demonstrate in separate applications that they have a need for time and space to work.

The Family Residency is offered during these two weeks:

  • July 29th-August 3rd (for children 6-12 years old)

  • August 19th-August 24th (for children 3-5 years old)

If your availability and your child’s age does not correspond to the designated week, we ask that you check back for our 2020 application, which will be posted toward the middle of 2019. If you would like for more than one child to join you at SPACE but the children fall into two different age categories, please contact residencies@spaceonryderfarm.org to discuss your options.

All Family Residencies are fully-subsidized. Residents may need to cover their travel to and from the farm. If you are traveling from New York City, a round-trip off-peak Metro North ticket from Grand Central Terminal to Brewster Terminal is $29.00. Transportation between the Brewster Terminal and farm is provided by the SPACE team. As of the 2018 season, accepted Family Residents are able to apply to a travel fund to help offset their travel costs. The allocation of funds is based on a resident’s geographical location and financial circumstances. 

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: October 8, 2018

  • Semi-finalists notified: February 2019

  • Finalists interviews: March 2019

  • Final decisions: Early April 2019

spaceonryderfarm.org/the-working-farm

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS - NEW MOONS: CONTEMPORARY WRITING BY NORTH AMERICAN MUSLIMS

Red Hen Press

INFO: Red Hen Press is seeking submissions on any subject in all genres of creative writing, including fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction and cross-genre work, by North American Muslims for publication in an anthology. They seek to represent the full diverse range of voices in the North American Muslim community. 

For prose (including fiction and nonfiction) or cross genre work, please send no more than 3,000 words.

For poetry, please include 5-10 poems.

DEADLINE: October 15, 2018

redhenpress.submittable.com/submit/109692/call-for-submissions-new-moons-contemporary-writing-by-north-american-muslims

 

Emerging Writers Contest

Honolulu Civil Beat 

INFO: Civil Beat is looking for smart, thoughtful writers with a passion for telling stories about Hawaii – and the issues that matter most to those of us living here.

We’re seeking original columns, essays or commentary — nonfiction — written in distinctive and diverse voices that focus on local public affairs, social concerns or other topics that affect the daily lives of people in your community, so you need to live in Hawaii to enter.

What we’re looking for:

  • A strong, compelling voice. Don’t be shy about telling it like it is and expressing yourself on your own terms.

  • Clear and insightful writing.

  • An eye for spotting fresh, untold stories.

  • A solid understanding of whatever you’re writing about based on facts and original reporting.

AWARD: The top three entries will win cash prizes: $500 for first place, $300 for second place and $200 for third place. The winning entries will be published in Civil Beat – and could lead to a paid, regular spot as a columnist. 

DEADLINE:  October 15, 2018

civilbeat.org/2018/09/enter-civil-beats-emerging-writers-contest/

  

The 2019 San Miguel Writer's Conference Writing Contest 

San Miguel Writers’ Conference & Literary Festival

 INFO: Submit your poetry, creative nonfiction, fiction, and Spanish short story for a chance to attend the 14th annual San Miguel Writers’ Conference free of charge. Four writers will be awarded the entire five day “Full Conference Package” (Feb 13–17th 2019) as well as have their housing provided during the conference, and a chance to pitch to a literary agent.

The contest is open to anyone writing in English who has not yet published or self-published a book that has sold over 1,000 copies in the genre of application. Faculty and administrators of the San Miguel Writers’ Conference are not eligible to submit to the writing contest. Previous winners of the writing contest cannot submit and win a second time. Note: For the new category of “International Short Story (Spanish)” submissions should be written predominantly in Spanish.

Work submitted must be unpublished. Work may be simultaneously submitted elsewhere, but if it is published or accepted prior to the judging, it will be disqualified from the competition.

AWARD: “Full Conference Package” fee waivers, including housing, and one agent pitch session will be granted to one writer in each of the following genres: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and international Spanish short story. Transportation to San Miguel de Allende is not provided. The award is valid only for the specific year of the contest and may not be transferred or exchanged.

SUBMISSION FEE: An entry fee of $30 must be paid for each submission. Note: For the new category of “International Short Story (Spanish)” the fee for this year has been set at $20 USD.

DEADLINE: November 1, 2018

sanmiguelwritersconference.org/writing-contest/

FICTION / NONFICTION -- SEPTEMBER 2018

The Margins Fellowship 2019

Asian American Writers’ Workshop 

INFO: The Asian American Writers’ Workshop is now accepting applications for the 2019 Margins Fellowship. 

Four emerging Asian American writers of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction based in New York City aged 30 and under will receive $5,000, residency time at the Millay Colony for the Arts, mentorship, access to the AAWW writing space, and publication opportunities in our online magazine, The Margins. We see this as a chance to support writers from Asian diasporic, West Asian, Arab, and North and East African communities as well as Muslim writers of color more broadly. If you are a writer of color who identifies with these communities, please discuss this in your application.

The Margins is the Asian American Writers’ Workshop’s online magazine of arts and ideas featuring new fiction and poetry, literary and cultural criticism, and interviews with writers and artists. Our stories have been linked to by the Wall Street Journal, The New Inquiry, Literary Hub, and the New York Times. Our contributors include Chang-rae Lee, Jessica Hagedorn, Vijay Iyer, Bhanu Kapil, Katie Kitamura, Hua Hsu, Amitava Kumar, and Yoko Ogawa.

All applicants should read our FAQ before applying to determine whether or not they are eligible. The Margins fellowship is open to emerging Asian American, Muslim, and Arab creative writers who are age 30 or under and reside in New York City. Fellowship applicants may not be enrolled in any academic, conservatory, college, or degree granting training program during the fellowship term. 
 
DEADLINE: September 12, 2018

aaww.org/apply-the-margins-fellowship-2019/

 

RADCLIFFE INSTITUTE FELLOWSHIPS

Harvard University

INFO: The Radcliffe Institute Fellowship Program is a scholarly community where individuals pursue advanced work across a wide range of academic disciplines, professions, and creative arts (including Fiction, Poetry, Nonfiction/Biography/ Autobiography/Memoir, Nonfiction/Current Issues, Playwriting or Screenwriting, and other topics). 

To be considered for a fellowship in fiction or nonfiction, applicants must have any of the following: one or more published books, contract for the publication of a book-length manuscript, or at least three shorter works (longer than newspaper articles) published. Evidence of publication in print format within the last five years is highly desirable; Web site publications are not acceptable as the only form of previously published work. Applicants should note that reviewers take into account evidence of a distinctive, original voice, richness or dimensionality of text, and coherence in the project plan. Professionals interested in writing about their work experiences should apply in the category of nonfiction. Recommendations from editors and/or agents are not acceptable.

AWARD: Radcliffe Institute fellows are in residence for a period of nine months between September 1, 2019 and May 31, 2020 and receive a stipend of $77,500 plus an additional $5,000 to cover project expenses. Applicants may apply for either one or two semesters. Single-semester Radcliffe fellows receive a $38,750 stipend plus an additional $2,500 to cover project expenses.

This is a residential fellowship; therefore, fellows are expected to reside in the Boston area for the duration of their time as Radcliffe fellows. Fellows are expected to be free of their regular commitments so they may devote themselves full time to the work outlined in their proposal. The Institute will provide office or studio space and access to libraries and other resources at Harvard University during the fellowship year. Radcliffe fellows may also be eligible to receive relocation, housing, and childcare funds to aid them in making a smooth transition to Radcliffe. Health care options are made available as needed.

DEADLINE: September 13, 2018

radcliffe.harvard.edu/fellowship-program/how-apply

 

The MacDowell Colony

INFO: The MacDowell Colony provides time, space, and an inspiring environment to artists of exceptional talent. A MacDowell Fellowship, or residency, consists of exclusive use of a studio, accommodations, and three prepared meals a day for up to eight weeks. There are no residency fees.

MacDowell Fellows are selected by our admissions panels, which are comprised of a revolving group of distinguished professionals in each artistic discipline who serve anonymously for three years.

The Colony accepts applications from artists working in the following disciplines: architecture, film/video arts, interdisciplinary arts, literature, music composition, theatre, and visual arts. The sole criterion for acceptance is artistic excellence, which the Colony defines in a pluralistic and inclusive way. MacDowell encourages applications from artists representing the widest possible range of perspectives and demographics, and welcomes artists engaging in the broadest spectrum of artistic practice and investigating an unlimited array of inquiries and concerns. To that end, emerging as well as established artists are invited to apply. Applicants who are enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs as of the date of application are ineligible for a residency and therefore cannot apply. Doctoral candidates who have finished all coursework may apply.

MacDowell is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for all persons regardless of race, sex, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, physical ability or disability. The Colony offers barrier-free access in its main buildings and some studios. There are no medical facilities or medical personnel on site. MacDowell is situated in a rural area with limited access to medical care facilities. We strongly suggest that applicants with special medical needs contact the Resident Director before applying.

SUBMISSION FEE: $30

DEADLINE: September 15, 2018

https://macdowell.slideroom.com/#/Login 

 

2019-2020 Cullman Center Fellowship

INFO: The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers is an international fellowship program open to people whose work will benefit directly from access to the collections at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building—including academics, independent scholars, and creative writers (novelists, playwrights, poets). Visual artists at work on a book project are also welcome to apply. 

The Center appoints 15 Fellows a year for a nine-month term at the Library, from September through May. In addition to working on their own projects, the Fellows engage in an ongoing exchange of ideas within the Center and in public forums throughout the Library.

DEADLINE: September 28, 2018

nypl.org/help/about-nypl/fellowships-institutes/center-for-scholars-and-writers

 

Winter Tangerine Food Writing Workshop

Winter Tangerin / Kindiman

 INFO: From October 21st through October 27th, Kundiman will be collaborating with Winter Tangerine to offer an online Food Writing Workshop called "To Carry Within Us An Orchard, To Eat"!

In homes, in restaurant spaces, in the mixing and re-mixing of cuisines, Asian American and people from Asian diasporas often identify with–– and are defined by–– food. During this workshop, we will delve deep into the intimate reverberations and political implications that food evokes, while also forming a community around our shared rituals and desires. As food is so often tied to identity, the workshop seeks to celebrate Asian American and Asian diasporic food writing that already complicates master narratives while continuing the process of making space for our own food histories. During this workshop, we will work in community to generate conversation about food in all its manifestations and forms.

This one-week long online writing workshop includes full writing lessons, prompts, guided writing generation activities & a Guest Seminar, which are hour-long web classes with writers we love. We're overjoyed to welcome Muriel Leung to give a Guest Seminar for this workshop. Previous Guest Seminars have been given by Kaveh Akbar and Fatimah Asghar. This workshop is a collaboration between the literary organizations Winter Tangerine and Kundiman.

This workshop is for Asian American writers and writers from Asian diasporas who seek to expand the parameters of food writing while challenging their personal practice as creatives. Food is deeply personal, but also by nature communal: Together, we will find the celebrations, the struggles, and the beauty that makes up our food.

There is no age limit or requirement, and no experience is necessary. The title of this workshop comes from the poem “From Blossoms” by Li-Young Lee.

APPLICATION FEE: $0

TUITION: $75 (financial aid is available to those with need).

DEADLINE: September 30, 2018

kundiman.org/full-calendar/2018/10/21/winter-tangerine-food-writing-workshop

 

2017 RED HEN PRESS FICTION AWARD

INFO: Established in 2015 to nurture the unique and vibrant channels through which fiction has carried us, the Red Hen Fiction Award is for a fresh and original story of fiction with a minimum of 150 pages. The awarded fiction manuscript is selected through an annual submission process, which is open to all authors.

JUDGE: Ann Hood 

AWARD: $1,000 and publication by Red Hen Press

SUBMISSION FEE: $25

DEADLINE: September 30, 2018

redhen.org/awards-2/red-hen-press-fiction-award/

 

2019 PEN/Phyllis Naylor Working Writer Fellowship

INFO: The PEN/Phyllis Naylor Working Writer Fellowship is a $5,000 award offered annually to an author of children's or young-adult fiction. It has been developed to help writers whose work is of high literary caliber and is designed to assist a writer at a crucial moment in his or her career to complete a book-length work-in-progress.

DEADLINE: October 1, 2018

pen.submittable.com/submit/117323/2019-pen-phyllis-naylor-working-writer-fellowship-5-000

 

2019 PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction

INFO: The Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction, which was established in 2000 by Barbara Kingsolver and is funded entirely by her, was created to promote fiction that addresses issues of social justice and the impact of culture and politics on human relationships. The $25,000 prize is awarded biennially to the author of a previously unpublished novel of high literary caliber that exemplifies the prize’s founding principles. The winner also receives a publishing contract with Algonquin Books. 

SUBMISSION FEE: $25

Deadline: October 1, 2018

pen.submittable.com/submit/117329/2019-pen-bellwether-prize-for-socially-engaged-fiction-25-000

 

ISTORY

Narrative

INFO: An iStory is a short, dramatic narrative, fiction or nonfiction, up to 150 words long. They are particularly interested in works that give readers a strong sense of having read a full and complete story in a brief space.

AWARD: $100 for each iStory accepted for publication.

SUBMISSION FEE: There is a $22 fee for each submission. And with your submission, you’ll receive three months of complimentary access to Narrative Backstage.

narrativemagazine.com/iStory

FICTION / NONFICTION -- AUGUST 2018

2019 PEN AMERICA EMERGING VOICES FELLOWSHIP

INFOThe PEN America Emerging Voices Fellowship (EV) is a literary mentorship that aims to provide new writers who are isolated from the literary establishment with the tools, skills, and knowledge they need to launch a professional writing career. 

Emerging Voices is a rigorous national fellowship that is based in Los Angeles, with weekly meetings and an intense reading and writing schedule. If you are not a resident of Los Angeles, and you are awarded the fellowship you will need to relocate for the seven month period, from January to July of 2019. Housing is not provided. 

Components of the Emerging Voices Fellowship Include:

  • Guidance from a professional mentor.
  • Private Author Evenings with writers, agents, and publishers.
  • Genre-specific master classes.
  • UCLA Extension Writers' Program classes.
  • A professional voice instruction class and recording session.
  • A submissions workshop.
  • A volunteer opportunity.
  • Authors photos and professional bio.
  • Three public readings in Los Angeles.
  • A $1,000 stipend. 

People ineligible for the Emerging Voices Fellowship:

  • Those who have an M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D., or minor in Creative Writing.
  • Students currently enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs.
  • Writers who have published one or more books through major publishing houses, university presses, or established presses.
  • Current professional magazine and or newspaper feature writers or editors.
  • Writers who are widely published in top-tier literary journals and/or magazines.
  • Anyone under the age of 21. 

Applications Must Include:

  • Completed short answers.
  • A professional CV or résumé. Please list any writing experience, education, and publishing credits. 
  • Two current letters of recommendation written by people who are either familiar with your writing, or can attest to your ability to complete a long term project. Letters must include the recommender's current e-mail address and phone number. Recommenders are not notified until the completed application is submitted. It is the applicant's responsibility to ensure that the two letters are uploaded on August 1, 2018, by 11:59 PM Eastern Standard Time.  (If you are waiting until the last minute to apply, be sure to notify your recommenders ahead of time so that their letters are ready to upload.)
  • A writing sample of up to 20 pages of double-spaced fiction or creative nonfiction, or 10 pages of single-spaced poetry. This sample should be relevant to the project you are proposing in the short answer section of your Emerging Voices Fellowship Application. Writing samples that exceed this page count will be disqualified.

Writing Samples Must:

  • Include full name and e-mail address on each page.
  • Be typed, double-spaced, paginated in 12-point Times New Roman font.
  • Uploaded as an attachment.
  • Not be longer than the required page count. (See above.)

Notification:

Finalists will be notified mid-November and will be required to interview in person with the selection committee in Los Angeles. The list of selected fellows will be posted on the PEN America website following interviews. 

SUBMISSION FEE: $10

DEADLINE: August 1, 2018

pen.submittable.com/submit/116936/2019-pen-america-emerging-voices-fellowship-application

 

2019 PEN/Jean Stein Grant for Literary Oral History

INFO: The PEN/Jean Stein Grant for Literary Oral History recognizes a literary work of nonfiction that uses oral history to illuminate an event, individual, place, or movement. The winner will receive a $10,000 grant to help maintain or complete his or her ongoing project. 

DEADLINE: August 15, 2018 

pen.submittable.com/submit/117322/2019-pen-jean-stein-grant-for-literary-oral-history-10-000

 

The Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence 

INFO: The Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence honors Louisiana’s revered storyteller, Ernest J. Gaines, and serves to inspire and recognize rising African-American fiction writers of excellence at a national level. The book award, initiated by donors of the Baton Rouge Area Foundation, is now in its 12th year and has become nationally recognized in its role of enhancing visibility of emerging African-American fiction writers while also expanding the audience for this literature.

The 2018 panel of judges are themselves renowned contributors to the literary world. They are Anthony Grooms, Edward P. Jones, Elizabeth Nunez, Francine Prose and Patricia Towers.

PRIZE:

  • $10,000 cash prize is to support the writer and help enable her/him to focus on her/his art of writing.
  • The Baton Rouge Area Foundation sponsors the winner’s travel to Baton Rouge, Louisiana to receive the prize at a ceremony attended by Ernest Gaines where the author reads an excerpt from the selected work of fiction. A reception follows. The evening is free, open to the public and attracts a diverse audience.
  • The literary award winner also participates in educational activities at selected area schools and after-school programs in keeping with the Gaines Award's interest in emphasizing the role of literature and arts in education. Through small creative writing workshops with the winning author, students are encouraged to pursue reading, delve into their own creativity, and to consider becoming an author.

DEADLINE: August 15, 2018

ernestjgainesaward.org/literary-award-criteria-registration/

 

Full Fellowships for Writers and Journalists

Under the Volcano

INFO: Under the Volcano announce the current application cycle for three full fellowships for English-language writers and journalists.

Grace Paley Fellowship - “for a woman writer of any age whose writing Grace Paley would have encouraged,” covers full tuition to any of our English-language master classes (fiction, poetry or memoir), our two-week extension residency, RT airfare to Mexico, 24 nights accommodation and most meals. DEADLINE: August 15, 2018.

Sandra Cisneros Fellowship - which recognizes a US Latino/a writer of outstanding literary promise and leadership ability. Names and contact info should be sent to director@underthevolcano.org. Same conditions as above. DEADLINE: August 15, 2018.

Margot Adler Fellowship for Innovative Journalism – established in honor of the extraordinary late NPR reporter, recognizes “a young working journalist whose commitment to contemporary issues would resonate with the life work of Margot Adler.” The recipient will attend our English-language investigative journalism master class with Pulitzer-Prize winning reporter David Barstow of the New York Times. The award coverage is identical to that of the Grace Paley Fellowship. DEADLINE: September 1, 2018.

underthevolcano.org/2018/07/19/full-fellowships-for-writers-and-journalists-to-under-the-volcano-2019/

 

Visiting Writer Fellowship

Red Bull Arts Detroit

INFO: The Visiting Writer Fellowship allows a writer to travel to Detroit twice over a two-month period to develop a piece of writing and a public program, such as a talk or a workshop. The writer will be introduced to cultural figures throughout the city, and be in dialogue with the Red Bull Artists in Residence. Travel, accommodations, and a 2,000 USD stipend are provided. 

DEADLINE: August 24, 2018

redbullarts.com/detroit/news/applications-for-2019-open-now/

 

Magazine Submissions: Pleasure #81, Winter 2019

Bitch Media

INFO: It might seem like the wrong time to do an issue on the theme of Pleasure: As we log on each day and are promptly hit with what seems like year’s worth of bad news, pleasure often feels like either a luxury we can’t afford (the word itself just sounds so...indulgent) or an ethically dicey pursuit best kept to ourselves. What does pleasure look like in a time of near-constant moral emergency? Where do we seek it? Who gets to define and own it? Why, even in times of political and social crisis, do we need to find room in our lives for it?

For issue 81, we want to explore pleasure as a necessary—if often subjective—component of feminism, of activism, of political autonomy, of identity. While “pleasure” as both noun and verb has an inescapably sexual frisson, this issue isn’t all about the booty: We want to see stories, reportage, analysis, and commentary that speak to pleasure in all its complexities and dimensions. Unfettered pleasure, guilty pleasure, esoteric pleasure, secret pleasure (psst: no one has to know it’s you)—these shape our histories, creating and re-creating the mediated world. And we want all of them. We want our writers to ask and answer complex questions about who gets access to pleasure, especially in this trying time.  

Here are a few prompts: 

  • Has the historical gendering of pleasure changed in a time of shifting gender strictures?
  • What makes pleasure political? 
  • How have marginalized communities historically enacted and accessed pleasure? 
  • Did slaves have orgasms? Hey, it’s a worthy question to ask.
  • What makes eating a pleasurable activity to engage in? 
  • Why are we still culturally invested in the concept of “guilty pleasures?” 

SECTIONS: Features, Culture, Front-of-Book

Features

Features are deep dives into the intersection of feminism and pop culture. Long-form and essay writers examine, ruminate, and push boundaries. The writing is tight, top-notch, and original. We are looking for pieces that not only dive deep, but dive where no one else is looking.

Investigative Essay (2000–2500)   You smell a buried story and want to tell the world what’s going on. Complete with research, reporting, and clear, concise writing, this piece braids information and intrigue and takes the readers on a journey through something underreported, unknown, or in need of a spotlight.

Analytical Feature  (1500–1800)   Nonfiction feminist critical essays are not about the “I” statements—a Bitch essay critiques a larger systematic or cultural problem by centering a marginal community and exploring the impact of that issue for a particular demographic.  At its heart, it's a soaring cultural critique. This feature establishes your chops as a writer who is unafraid to go there. It’s an essay that demonstrates that you have cultivated your own distinct voice, your own Bitch sound, and your work unapologetically expresses an unforgettable message that centers your community, resistance, and establishes new ground with unchartered possibilities for how to live free.

Culture

This section is where Bitch brands and solidifies its cultural authority. From celebrating significant pieces of pop culture that are turning 20 to analyzing the Impact Of directors, producers, and screenwriters (500–800 words), Culture examines elements of our lives that show up in books, on screens, in music, and all over the internet.

Turning 20 (800–1000 words) is a feature that explores the cultural impact of one piece of pop culture that’s celebrating that golden anniversary. It can be a celebrity’s significant moment at the VMAs, a TV show that changed the landscape forever, or even a book that’s still as readable now as it was then.

Culture also features three analytical essays (650–700 words) that look at themes springing up in books, screen, and music, and explore the cultural context for that theme and why it’s significant. Are multiple TV shows depicting abortions? How is YA literature handling sexual assault? We want to know.

Lastly, Culture wants to know the people behind-the-scenes who are making television and movie magic (400–500 words). Who’s the next Ava Duvernay or Joi McMillon or Shonda Rhimes? These interviews highlight voices that are rarely tapped into.

Front-of-Book

Dispatches (900–1000 words) are missives from the frontlines. We’re looking for underreported and fascinating stories from across the country, the globe, and the realms of fiction that center location and introduce Bitch readers to stories and topics they might not have encountered before. A great dispatch could be from Argentina or Tennessee just as easily as Westeros or West World.

DEADLINE: August 28, 2018

bitchmedia.submittable.com/submit/118908/magazine-submissions-pleasure-81-winter-2019

 

Diverse Voices Scholarship

The Author Accelerator

INFO: At Author Accelerator, we believe that diverse voices and perspectives are critical in a society that is truly striving for equality. And while the publishing industry has come a long way in recent years, it still has a long way to go in recognizing the importance of diverse perspectives in literature, particularly when it comes to authors from historically marginalized groups.

As book coaches we recognize that there are myriad barriers for writers of color in the publishing industry. That’s why we’re launching a scholarship program with the mission of amplifying under-recognized voices by providing editorial guidance and career mentorship to emerging writers of color.

This scholarship provides two back-to-back Manuscript Accelerator coaching programs, a $5,200 value, over the course of a year, as well as career mentorship, which may include introductions to literary agents if appropriate.

Three scholarships will be offered beginning in January 2019, and are open to writers of color who meet the following criteria:

  • Have not yet published a book with a print run of more than 1,000
  • Are not currently represented by an agent
  • Have a book-length project currently under development
  • Seek to establish a career as an author

SUBMISSION FEE: $0

DEADLINE: August 31, 2018

authoraccelerator.com/scholarship/

 

INDIVIDUAL AWARDS

Sustainable Arts Foundation

INFO: Sustainable Arts Foundation – a non-profit foundation supporting artists and writers with families – is committed to offering half of its awards to applicants of color.

Writers may apply in one of the following categories:

  • Creative Nonfiction
  • Early and Middle Grade Fiction
  • Fiction
  • Graphic Novels
  • Long Form Journalism
  • Picture Books
  • Playwriting
  • Poetry
  • Young Adult Fiction

AWARD: $5,000

DEADLINE: August 31, 2018

apply.sustainableartsfoundation.org/

 

DISPLACED ARTISTS FUND

Vermont Studio Center

INFO: Vermont Studio Center’s Displaced Artists Fund exists to assist visual artists and writers displaced due to natural disasters, climate change, or political turmoil or threat by providing residencies in a safe and supportive community of creative peers.

By providing a creative community of refuge in Vermont, these residencies restore normalcy to studio practice, ease the isolation that often accompanies displacement, and extend VSC’s founding spirit of “artists supporting artists” to those most in need. 

ELIGIBILITY: Artists from Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico, & the Caribbean Displaced by the 2017 Hurricane Season, and U.S. Artists Displaced by 2017-2018 Wildfires.

In the email, briefly describe your eligibility, including:

  • The nature of your displacement
  • The nature of your artistic or writing practice
  • Why a residency would be helpful at this time.

Applications will be reviewed during the first week of each month as long as funding exists. Priority review may be available to applicants with immediate verifiable need (manuscript deadline, gallery show, or other time-sensitive professional opportunity).

DEADLINE: Ongoing

vsc.cmail19.com/t/ViewEmail/j/C88D3A935B6ED7732540EF23F30FEDED/B88CBE7D284961401A01488700E2614F

 

 

 

 

FICTION / NONFICTION - JULY 2018

WRITING FOR JUSTICE FELLOWSHIP

PEN America

INFO: The PEN America Writing for Justice Fellowship aims to harness the power of writers and writing in bearing witness to the societal consequences of mass incarceration by capturing and sharing the stories of incarcerated individuals, their families, communities, and the wider impact of the criminal justice system. Our goal is to ignite a broad, sustained conversation about the dangers of over-incarceration and the imperative to mobilize behind rational and humane policies. As an organization of writers dedicated to promoting free expression and informed discourse, PEN America is honored to have been entrusted by the Art for Justice Fund to engage the literary community in addressing this pressing societal issue. 

PRIZE$10,000 fellowship

SUBMISSION PERIOD: Now through July 1, 2018

pen.org/writing-justice/?utm_source=Communications&utm_campaign=9e02fa12e7-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_03_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c67d07604c-9e02fa12e7-247263605&mc_cid=9e02fa12e7&mc_eid=d562c31e56

 

CAMP: A SPECIAL ISSUE OF THE MARGINS

Asian American Writers’ Workshop 

INFO: The first summer camps in the US were founded in the late 19th century out of rising anxieties over the waning masculinity of young white boys in the midst of urban expansion—if they spend all their time inside, how would they become men who can survive in the wild? Summer camp has always been a culturally nationalist project, firmly rooted in the founding mythos of white American masculinity and held on the indigenous land stolen under settler colonialism. 

How do Asian American experiences of camp square with its settler colonial history? What does camp mean for Asian Americans? For those who don’t assimilate to the forceful conformity of camp, it can be a site of alienation. For some, immigrant cultural camps and language classes are ways to stay connected to the homeland, and often imagine it in deeply conservative terms.  Kumon and SAT prep can be staging grounds for the model minority narrative.     

What homes are made when you go to camp? For this special issue of The Margins, we’re looking for essays, fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, graphic work, and hybrid genre work by Asian American writers that trouble, expand, and re-define camp—and in the process might destabilize a relationship to the model minority narrative, to organized religion, and to homeland.

DEADLINE: July 2, 2018

aaww.submittable.com/submit/80ef3b9a-352d-4b10-845e-bb923876a475/camp-a-special-issue-of-the-margins

 

THE PROVERSE PRIZE FOR UNPUBLISHED NONFICTION, FICTION OR POETRY

Proverse Hong Kong

INFO: This annual international prize, established in 2008, is open to all who are at least eighteen years old, whatever their residence, nationality or citizenship, including new, emerging and established writers.

ENTRY FEE: $50

DEADLINE: July 6, 2018

proversehongkong.submittable.com/submit/119382/the-proverse-prize-for-unpublished-non-fiction-fiction-or-poetry-2018-book-leng

  

GENERAL SUBMISSIONS: FICTION

Epiphany Magazine

INFO: General submissions for Epiphany's Fall 2018 issue are now open. We are considering fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and graphic literature. 

COMPENSENATION: $150 for fiction, nonfiction, and graphic lit.

SUBMISSION FEE: $3

DEADLINE: July 7, 2018

epiphanymagazine.submittable.com/submit

  

GENERAL SUBMISSIONS: NONFICTION

Epiphany Magazine

INFO: General submissions for Epiphany's Fall 2018 issue are now open. We are considering fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and graphic literature. 

COMPENSENATION: $150 for fiction, nonfiction, and graphic lit. 

SUBMISSION FEE: $3 

DEADLINE: July 7, 2018

epiphanymagazine.submittable.com/submit/116975/fall-2018-submission-nonfiction

 

SPRING 2018 STORY CONTEST

Narrative Magazine

INFO: The Spring Contest is open to all fiction and nonfiction writers. We’re looking for short shorts, short stories, essays, memoirs, photo essays, graphic stories, all forms of literary nonfiction, and excerpts from longer works of both fiction and nonfiction. Entries must be previously unpublished, no longer than 15,000 words, and must not have been previously chosen as a winner, finalist, or honorable mention in another contest.

As always, we are looking for works with a strong narrative drive, with characters we can respond to, and with effects of language, situation, and insight that are intense and total. We look for works that have the ambition of enlarging our view of ourselves and the world.

AWARDS:

  • First Prize is $2,500
  • Second Prize is $1,000
  • ·Third Prize is $500
  • Up to ten finalists will receive $100 each. All entries will be considered for publication.
  • All contest entries are eligible for the $4,000 Narrative Prize and for acceptance as a Story of the Week.

SUBMISSION FEE: $26. And with your entry, you’ll receive three months of complimentary access to Narrative Backstage.

DEADLINE: July 31, 2018

narrativemagazine.com/spring-2018-story-contest

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Fiyah Magazine

INFO: Every journey starts with a single step, and this issue is all about the trip, not the destination. We’re looking for stories of journeys to new worlds, of returning to lost worlds, and journeys of the soul. But, like always, make it weird, make it magical, make it Black.

We are looking for brave works of speculative short fiction by authors from the African continent and diaspora that reject regressive ideas of blackness, respectability politics, and stereotype. Please submit your bravest, blackest, most difficult to sell stories to us. We want to read them. 

DEADLINE: July 31, 2018

http://www.fiyahlitmag.com/submissions/

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: FICTION

Apogee

INFO: Apogee is a journal of literature and art that engages with identity politics, including but not limited to: race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and intersectional identities. We are a biannual print publication featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual art. Our goals are twofold: to publish fresh work that interrogates the status quo, and to provide a platform for underrepresented voices, prioritizing artists and writers of color.

Prose should be under 5,000 words, in either .doc or .docx format. 

DEADLINE: July 31, 2018

https://apogeejournal.submittable.com/submit 

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: CREATIVE NONFICTION

Apogee

INFO: Apogee is a journal of literature and art that engages with identity politics, including but not limited to: race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and intersectional identities. We are a biannual print publication featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual art. Our goals are twofold: to publish fresh work that interrogates the status quo, and to provide a platform for underrepresented voices, prioritizing artists and writers of color.

Prose should be under 5,000 words, in either .doc or .docx format. 

DEADLINE: July 31, 2018

https://apogeejournal.submittable.com/submit 

 

2019 PEN AMERICA EMERGING VOICES FELLOWSHIP

INFO: The PEN America Emerging Voices Fellowship (EV) is a literary mentorship that aims to provide new writers who are isolated from the literary establishment with the tools, skills, and knowledge they need to launch a professional writing career. 

Emerging Voices is a rigorous national fellowship that is based in Los Angeles, with weekly meetings and an intense reading and writing schedule. If you are not a resident of Los Angeles, and you are awarded the fellowship you will need to relocate for the seven month period, from January to July of 2019. Housing is not provided. 

Components of the Emerging Voices Fellowship Include:

  • Guidance from a professional mentor.
  • Private Author Evenings with writers, agents, and publishers.
  • Genre-specific master classes.
  • UCLA Extension Writers' Program classes.
  • A professional voice instruction class and recording session.
  • A submissions workshop.
  • A volunteer opportunity.
  • Authors photos and professional bio.
  • Three public readings in Los Angeles.
  • A $1,000 stipend. 

People ineligible for the Emerging Voices Fellowship:

  • Those who have an M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D., or minor in Creative Writing.
  • Students currently enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs.
  • Writers who have published one or more books through major publishing houses, university presses, or established presses.
  • Current professional magazine and or newspaper feature writers or editors.
  • Writers who are widely published in top-tier literary journals and/or magazines.
  • Anyone under the age of 21. 

Applications Must Include:

  • Completed short answers.
  • A professional CV or résumé. Please list any writing experience, education, and publishing credits. 
  • Two current letters of recommendation written by people who are either familiar with your writing, or can attest to your ability to complete a long term project. Letters must include the recommender's current e-mail address and phone number. Recommenders are not notified until the completed application is submitted. It is the applicant's responsibility to ensure that the two letters are uploaded on August 1, 2018, by 11:59 PM Eastern Standard Time.  (If you are waiting until the last minute to apply, be sure to notify your recommenders ahead of time so that their letters are ready to upload.)
  • A writing sample of up to 20 pages of double-spaced fiction or creative nonfiction, or 10 pages of single-spaced poetry. This sample should be relevant to the project you are proposing in the short answer section of your Emerging Voices Fellowship Application. Writing samples that exceed this page count will be disqualified.

Writing Samples Must:

  • Include full name and e-mail address on each page.
  • Be typed, double-spaced, paginated in 12-point Times New Roman font.
  • Uploaded as an attachment.
  • Not be longer than the required page count. (See above.)

Notification:

Finalists will be notified mid-November and will be required to interview in person with the selection committee in Los Angeles. The list of selected fellows will be posted on the PEN America website following interviews. 

SUBMISSION FEE: $10

DEADLINE: August 1, 2018

pen.submittable.com/submit/116936/2019-pen-america-emerging-voices-fellowship-application

FICTION / NON FICTION -- JUNE 2018

JUNIPER SUMMER WRITING INSTITUTE APPLICATION 2018

INFO: The Juniper Summer Writing Institute is an inclusive literary space that welcomes adult writers from different genres at all stages of their  careers. Acceptance to the Institute is based upon the strength and promise of the writing sample. We operate on a rolling admissions basis, and we do our best to make admission decisions within 2-6 weeks of  receiving applications

Once accepted, enrollment in the Institute is guaranteed on a first-come, first-served basis. You will need to put down a non-refundable deposit of $200 to secure your space.

Application materials include: 

Application Fee
A non-refundable application fee of $40 (U.S.) is required with each application. Applicants pay the fee by debit or credit card through a secure site.

Writing Sample
The strength and promise of your writing sample is the most important component of your application. Send your best work; it needn’t be published, though published work is acceptable, and it does not have to be  the same sample you wish to present in workshop. Writing samples are comprised of:

  • 5-7 pages of poetry (one poem per page) or
  • 7-9 pages of fiction or creative nonfiction/memoir (double-spaced)
  • Visual art (drawings, graphics, or pictures, etc.) are optional for applicants to the "words + pictures" workshop

Writing samples should be saved in one document (doc, docx,  pdf, rtf, or txt). Please include your name & email address as a header or footer in the writing sample. Visual art samples may be jpg, gif, png, mp4, avi, or mov. 

Note: Guidelines for applying to the special topics workshops (words + pictures, and literary arts + action) are the same as applying for fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction. You may submit any genre, according to that genre's page limits. 

Workshop Preference
You will have the opportunity in your application form to indicate your preferences for workshop leader. Every effort will be made to accommodate your preference. 

Please note: *If your second choice is in a different genre than your first choice, you may be contacted by email to submit additional materials.

Personal Statement
A personal statement of no more than 300 words describing your interest in the Juniper Summer Writing Institute. Please explain why this would be a meaningful opportunity, any relevant experience of writing community, and what you think you can contribute to the Institute. If you are applying for funding, please also address how receiving a scholarship would affect your ability to attend.

SUBMISSION FEE: $40

DEADLINE: June 1, 2018

junipersummerwritinginstitute.submittable.com/submit

 

THE TRANSPACIFIC LITERARY PROJECT

Asian American Writers’ Workshop

INFO: The Transpacific Literary Project is an ambitious online editorial initiative of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop (AAWW) that is poised to foster literary connections between East and Southeast Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Asian diaspora, and a broader American reading public. The project has taken the shape of a series of portfolios published on AAWW’s online magazine The Margins. These portfolios comprise poetry and prose written by East and Southeast Asian writers, with an emphasis on works in translation, curated around broad themes, and seek to traverse geographic and other boundaries.

 For this next folio in the Transpacific Literary Project, they’re looking for fiction, graphic fiction, essays, poetry, and creative nonfiction on these themes by writers from East and Southeast Asia*. Work in translation is especially welcome. If the submission is by the translator, please indicate if English-language rights are available. We also welcome submissions of images, photo essays, and works of art that speak to the framework described above.

Submissions should be titled “Plastic_Lastname_Firstname”

AAWW will hold exclusive print and online rights to your piece for 90 days, and your story will be archived online. All other rights remain with the writer and translator. All contributors of original work (including translators) will be paid. We are also happy to look at ARCs of forthcoming books with a view to publishing extracts. 

DEADLINE: Friday, June 1, 2018

aaww.submittable.com/submit

  

2018 SUMMER WRITERS WEEK

The Hurston / Wright Foundation

INFO: The mission of the Hurston/Wright Foundation is to discover, mentor, and honor Black writers. Named for literary geniuses Zora Neale Hurston and Richard Wright, the foundation preserves this legacy and works to ensure the future of Black writers and the literature they produce.

For more than 20 years, the Hurston/Wright Summer Writers Workshop has offered a safe space for writers in intensive workshop sessions and master classes. Workshops are led by award-winning writers who are influencing today’s literature. The program features critiques, craft talks, writing time and public readings.

Hurston/Wright workshops serve emerging and experienced writers who are starting projects, developing projects or seeking to polish projects. More than a thousand writers have participated in workshops since the first session in 1996.

Hurston/Wright is a community that supports you and your writing life.

Fiction Workshop led by Mitchell S. Jackson

Nonfiction Workshop led by Pamela Newkirk

Poetry Workshop will be led by Tiphanie Yanique

 IMPORTANT DATES: 

  • Deadline: June 1, 2018
  • Writers Week: Saturday, August 4 – Friday, August 10, 2018

hurstonwright.org/2018-writers-week/

  

CALL FOR SUBMISSION: FICTION ISSUE

The Scholar and Feminist Online

INFO: This special issue of The Scholar and Feminist Online takes its inspiration from a generation of writers who changed the literary landscape from the 1960s to the 1990s. This generation of includes legends like Toni Cade Bambara, James Baldwin, Grace Paley, Sandra Ciseneros, Louise Erdrich, Toni Morrison, Dorothy Allison, Les Feinberg, and Octavia Butler. They wrote across genres, historical moments, political movements, and experiences of marginalization, but together they are linked by a broad left politics and a means of storytelling that conveys urgency, reveals power in its many forms, and inspires action. Taking heed of this legacy, this issue of SF Online will share the works of writers imagining with a similar sense of responsibility to left literary imaginations and the worlds we want to build.

In 2018, we are met with a familiar high-pitched urgency. The multi-pronged crisis of white supremacy, capitalism, colonialism, militarism, and ecological destruction call for stories that allow us to reflect, find inspiration, take action, and accept reprieves from the horrific conditions of this world. This issue of SF Online seeks to share the stories of this generation that map a different vision, and buoy us while we are caught in these turbulent seas.

About The Scholar and Feminist Online

SF Online is a free feminist publication that, since its founding issue in 2003, has published academics, activists, and multimedia artists on topics ranging from queer politics centering anti-racism, anti-capitalism, and trans justice, to the literary and political legacy of Black feminist poet, playwright, and choreographer Ntozake Shange. The journal’s commitment to bridging the actual and imagined barriers between activism and academia pushes the journal to remain accessible and relevant to a broad community of readers and practice a politics of feminist knowledge production and modes of leveraging critique.

About the Fiction Issue

This issue of SF Online will address urgent political issues through storytelling, amplifying the journal’s legacy of engaging creative and multimedia work while taking a departure from its history of academic critique. The issue will feature short stories, illustrated works, performance art pieces, and other cultural works in which fiction writers and other storytellers grapple with the problems of our political moment, inventing worlds to better understand our own, calling out warnings, and imagining futures without war, without violence, without white supremacy, without capitalism, and without prisons.

Consistent with the politics of SF Online and the literary legacy inspiring this particular issue, we are seeking writing by and about women, people of color, immigrants, queers, trans and gender nonconforming people, disabled people, and survivors of violence, war, institutional and/or interpersonal abuse. We are also looking for stories dealing with contemporary or historical issues grounded in feminist, anti-racist, anti-capitalist, left political analysis. We welcome various narrative fiction genres including realism, speculative fiction, magical realism, dystopian fiction, flash fiction, etc.

Inspired by the model offered by “Navigating Neoliberalism in the Academy, Nonprofits, and Beyond” edited by Soniya Munshi and Craig Willse, this issue would like to include a number of reprints of groundbreaking feminist, left fiction. We are considering titles from the authors that inspire this issue, including Toni Cade Bambara, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, Dorothy Allison, Tillie Olsen, Grace Paley, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Ciseneros, Les Feinberg, Minnie Bruce Pratt, and others. 

DEADLINE: June 15, 2018.

mailchi.mp/barnard/call-for-submissions-short-stories-and-graphic-lit-for-the-revolution?e=1513d3b47e

 

WRITERS-IN-RESIDENCE

Rhode Island Writers Colony

INFO: The Colony’s purpose is to provide momentum; to be an impetus, for men and women fitting the criteria to focus, complete, and polish work; to develop work strong enough to stand on its own. These passionate emerging writers come from a multitude of combination of walks; single, African-American, Caribbean, Mediterranean, Hispanic, Latino, East Asian, Native American, African, married, gay, lesbian, or straight. 

FEES: There is a one-time fee of $550 for attendance

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: June 29, 2018
  • Residency: July 21-August 5, 2018

rhodeislandwriterscolony.com/

 

LOUISE MERIWETHER FIRST BOOK PRIZE

Feminist Press

INFO: The Louise Meriwether First Book was founded in 2016 to honor author Louise Meriwether by publishing a debut work by a woman or nonbinary author of color. The prize is granted to a manuscript that follows in the tradition of Meriwether’s Daddy Was a Number Runner, one of the first contemporary American novels featuring a young black girl as the protagonist. First time authors, submit your complete manuscript, either fiction or nonfiction (such as: novel, memoir, short story collection, biography, manifesto, or other work of nonfiction), of 30,000 to 80,000 words, and you could receive a $5,000 advance and publication by the Feminist Press.

The prize is open to women of color and nonbinary writers of color who are: residents of the fifty (50) United States, the District of Columbia, and US territories and possessions; 18 years of age or older at time of entry; and who have not had a book published or have a book under contract at the time of submission. All federal, state, and local regulations apply.  Candidates may not submit the same manuscript in subsequent years unless specifically invited by the Feminist Press. Employees of the Feminist Press and TAYO Literary Magazine and their immediate family members and persons living in their household are not eligible to enter.

Finalists will be notified in October. One winner will be announced in February 2019.

PRIZE: One winner will be awarded a $5,000 advance (half at the time of the initial award and half upon publication) and a contract to publish their book with the Feminist Press in print and digital editions in spring 2020. We expect to work closely with the winner and provide editorial guidance on their manuscript.

DEADLINE: June 30, 2018

feministpress.org/louise-meriwether-first-book-prize/

 

WRITING FOR JUSTICE FELLOWSHIP

PEN America

INFO: The PEN America Writing for Justice Fellowship aims to harness the power of writers and writing in bearing witness to the societal consequences of mass incarceration by capturing and sharing the stories of incarcerated individuals, their families, communities, and the wider impact of the criminal justice system. Our goal is to ignite a broad, sustained conversation about the dangers of over-incarceration and the imperative to mobilize behind rational and humane policies. As an organization of writers dedicated to promoting free expression and informed discourse, PEN America is honored to have been entrusted by the Art for Justice Fund to engage the literary community in addressing this pressing societal issue. 

PRIZE: $10,000 fellowship

SUBMISSION PERIOD: Now through July 1, 2018

pen.org/writing-justice/?utm_source=Communications&utm_campaign=9e02fa12e7-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_03_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c67d07604c-9e02fa12e7-247263605&mc_cid=9e02fa12e7&mc_eid=d562c31e56

 

 

FICTION / NONFICTION -- MAY 2018

2018 NOEMI PRESS BOOK AWARD FOR POETRY AND PROSE

INFO: Two prizes of $1,000 each and publication by Noemi Press are given annually for one book-length poetry collection and one book-length work of prose. The editors will judge. 

POETRY: Poets at any stage in their career may submit a manuscript of no more than 90 pages with a $25 entry fee by May 1. 
PROSE: Prose writers at any stage in their career may submit a manuscript (no page limit) with a $25 entry fee by May 1. 


All manuscripts are read anonymouslyStrip your manuscript of all identifying material including dedications and acknowledgements; otherwise, the manuscript will not be considered. 

SUBMISSION FEE: $25.00

DEADLINE:  May 1, 2018

noemipress.submittable.com/submit/103542/2018-noemi-press-book-award-for-prose

 

CREATIVE NONFICTION GRANT

The Whiting Foundation 

INFO: The Whiting Foundation recognizes that works of deeply researched and imaginatively composed nonfiction come into being at great cost to writers in time and resources.

The Whiting Creative Nonfiction Grant of $40,000 will be awarded to as many as eight writers in the process of completing a book-length work of nonfiction for a general, not an academic, readership. Its purpose is to give grantees the additional means to do exacting research, to free up the time to bring the writing to the highest possible standard, and to encourage original and ambitious projects. 

Whiting welcomes submissions for works of history, cultural or political reportage, biography, memoir, the sciences, philosophy, criticism, food or travel writing, and personal essays, among other categories. Again, the work should be intended for a general reader.  Self-help titles and textbooks are not eligible.

Knowing that writers of color often face additional structural hurdles to securing institutional resources to support such projects, we particularly encourage applications from these writers.

Projects must currently be under contract with a publisher in the United States to be eligible, and the contract must have been signed at least two years before applying for the grant; this is to ensure that the writer is sufficiently far along to identify challenges that have arisen since beginning work. Contracts have to be dated on or prior to May 2, 2016 in order to be eligible - no exceptions. Authors must be US citizens or residents to qualify.

DEADLINE: May 2, 2018 at 11:59pm ET

whiting.submittable.com/submit/96c2dec4-9830-4c73-9b70-fcaf7c308420/2018-whiting-creative-nonfiction-grant 

 

CITIZEN LITERARY FELLOWSHIP

Graywolf Press

INFO: The Citizen Literary Fellowship is a paid, comprehensive fellowship over ten months designed to support a person who is interested in learning more about the publishing industry through an introductory, hands-on experience. It is intended to attract candidates who otherwise would not have access to publishing, and to therefore increase the diversity and inclusivity of the industry. We are flexible regarding the educational background of the candidate, but this position is not intended for those attending school full time. 

This fellowship is grounded in our belief that while diversity in the books and authors we publish is vital, it is equally important that the people publishing these books reflect that diversity. Throughout the year, the fellow will receive active coaching and encouragement from the whole Graywolf team. Our hope is that this fellowship will serve as a doorway to a successful career in publishing or a related literary field.

The fellowship will be based in our Minneapolis office, and is a part-time (24 hours per week), non-exempt ten-month position with a start date in September 2018. Compensation includes $20,000 (paid twice monthly as regular wages), paid time off, and health and dental insurance.

 DEADLINE: May 4, 2018

graywolfpress.submittable.com/submit/112396/graywolf-press-citizen-literary-fellowship 

 

ARTIST FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM       

The Jerome Foundation

INFO: The Jerome Foundation is pleased to announce the first round of a new Artist Fellowship program that offers flexible, two-year grants to support the creative development of early-career generative artists in the state of Minnesota and the five boroughs of New York City. Artists may apply individually or together with other members of ongoing collectives or ensembles.

The Jerome Foundation makes a distinction between generative artists (those artists responsible for artistic control in generating entirely new work, including writers, choreographers, film directors, visual artists, composers, playwrights, etc.) and interpretive artists (those who interpret or execute the work created by others, including actors, editors, dramaturgs, singers, dancers, musicians, designers, etc.). The Foundation recognizes that some artists do both generative and interpretive work. Nevertheless, the Fellowship program supports only those artists with a significant history of generative work.

All eligible applicants must have a history of making and presenting new work to the public beyond student work (if the applicant has pursued formal training). While an applicant’s past projects are reviewed as part of the selection process, the program’s primary focus is supporting an artist’s future potential through the creation of new work or activities that support professional development and/or career advancement.

The Foundation will make 10 grants in each of six categories:

  • Dance
  • Literature (fiction, creative non-fiction and poetry)
  • ·Media—including Film, Video and Digital Production (documentary, narrative, animation, or experimental) and New Media (artistic work that is computational and distributed digitally, in the form of websites, mobile apps, virtual worlds, computer games, human-computer interface or interactive computer installations)
  • Music
  • Theater, Performance and Spoken Word
  • Visual arts

Artists whose work spans multiple disciplines may request to be reviewed in two different disciplines. The Foundation reserves the right, however, to direct such applications to a single panel.

AWARD: Each fellow will receive $20,000 per year for two consecutive years, making the total cash award $40,000 over the two-year period. Individual artists may petition the Foundation to reduce the award amount but must present specific, compelling reasons to do so. Artists applying as part of a collective or ensemble will share one $20,000 per year award.

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Application Period:  May 8, 2018 at 4pm Central / 5pm Eastern Time
  • Notification of grant awards: By April 15, 2019
  • Earliest Date to Receive Funds: May 8, 2019

jeromefdn.org/apply/artist-fellowship

 

ARTS WRITERS GRANT PROGRAM

Creative Capital

INFO: The Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program opened its 2018 grant applications today for both emerging and established writers who are writing about contemporary visual art. Ranging from $15,000 to $50,000 in four categories—articles, blogs, books and short-form writing—these grants support projects addressing both general and specialized art audiences, from scholarly studies to self-published blogs. The grant also supports art writing that engages criticism through interdisciplinary methods or experiments with literary styles.

Writers who meet the program's eligibility requirements are invited to apply in the following categories:

• Articles
• Blogs
• Books
• Short-Form Writing

DEADLINE: May 21, 2018

artswriters.org

 

JUNIPER SUMMER WRITING INSTITUTE APPLICATION 2018

INFO: The Juniper Summer Writing Institute is an inclusive literary space that welcomes adult writers from different genres at all stages of their  careers. Acceptance to the Institute is based upon the strength and promise of the writing sample. We operate on a rolling admissions basis, and we do our best to make admission decisions within 2-6 weeks of  receiving applications

Once accepted, enrollment in the Institute is guaranteed on a first-come, first-served basis. You will need to put down a non-refundable deposit of $200 to secure your space.

Application materials include: 

Application Fee
A non-refundable application fee of $40 (U.S.) is required with each application. Applicants pay the fee by debit or credit card through a secure site.

Writing Sample
The strength and promise of your writing sample is the most important component of your application. Send your best work; it needn’t be published, though published work is acceptable, and it does not have to be  the same sample you wish to present in workshop. Writing samples are comprised of:

  • 5-7 pages of poetry (one poem per page) or
  • 7-9 pages of fiction or creative nonfiction/memoir (double-spaced)
  • Visual art (drawings, graphics, or pictures, etc.) are optional for applicants to the "words + pictures" workshop

Writing samples should be saved in one document (doc, docx,  pdf, rtf, or txt). Please include your name & email address as a header or footer in the writing sample. Visual art samples may be jpg, gif, png, mp4, avi, or mov. 

Note: Guidelines for applying to the special topics workshops (words + pictures, and literary arts + action) are the same as applying for fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction. You may submit any genre, according to that genre's page limits. 

Workshop Preference
You will have the opportunity in your application form to indicate your preferences for workshop leader. Every effort will be made to accommodate your preference. 

Please note: *If your second choice is in a different genre than your first choice, you may be contacted by email to submit additional materials.

Personal Statement
A personal statement of no more than 300 words describing your interest in the Juniper Summer Writing Institute. Please explain why this would be a meaningful opportunity, any relevant experience of writing community, and what you think you can contribute to the Institute. If you are applying for funding, please also address how receiving a scholarship would affect your ability to attend.

SUBMISSION FEE: $40

DEADLINE: June 1, 2018

junipersummerwritinginstitute.submittable.com/submit

 

 

 

FICTION / NONFICTION -- APRIL 2018

2018 GRACE PALEY TEACHING FELLOWSHIP

New School

INFO: Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at the New School is welcoming applications for the second annual Grace Paley Teaching Fellowship, a semester-long residency in the First-Year Writing Program. The Fellowship will honor a writer of considerable achievement, in any genre, whose work also reveals a concern for social justice.

The Grace Paley Fellow will teach a first-year essay-writing seminar for 15 incoming undergraduate students. Classes meet twice per week throughout the Fall 2018 semester. In addition to the course, over the semester the Paley Fellow will deliver one public craft lecture, offer one public reading of new work, and participate in at least three informal lunch-time writing seminars where faculty take up various themes and topics of interest from our classes. The Fellow will also deliver a talk during the 2018 orientation for all incoming New School students and will be invited to deliver the keynote address at the spring 2019 Scholastic Writing Awards.

The Fellow works closely with the Director of First-Year Writing and other faculty to discuss pedagogy, grading, and assessment (including student preparedness for more advanced writing courses).

The Grace Paley Teaching Fellowship is open to writers in any genre (nonfiction, fiction, poetry, drama) whose work demonstrates a concern for social justice.

Applicants should have published at least two book-length works. These books, combined with additional publications, should demonstrate considerable achievement in the writer’s field and engagement with the world at large.

The New School is committed to creating and maintaining an environment that promises diversity and tolerance in all areas of employment, education and access to its educational, artistic or cultural programs and activities. The New School does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, creed, sex or gender (including gender identity and expression), pregnancy, sexual orientation, religion, religious practices, mental or physical disability, national or ethnic origin, citizenship status, veteran status, marital or partnership status, or any other legally protected status.

AWARD: The Fellowship offers a $25,000 stipend and is located in New York City.

DEADLINE: April 1, 2018

portfolio.newschool.edu/firstyearwriting/2017/12/15/2018-grace-paley-teaching-fellowship/

 

JACK JONES RETREAT

INFO: Jack Jones Literary Arts is hosting its second annual writing retreat at Blue Sky Retreat, Taos, New Mexico. This two-week retreat will be held October 13- 27, 2018, and is open exclusively to women of color. Jenna Wortham joins us as our 2018 Writer-in-Residence.

As part of the retreat experience, Jack Jones is featuring daily Skype master classes with agents, editors and acclaimed women in publishing to promote networking, learning and engagement. These sessions are mandatory for retreat participants.

Housing includes individual writing suites with private bedroom, private baths, communal fireplaces, writing areas, wifi, and all meals are provided.

Professional and emerging women writers of color at work on book projects are eligible for residencies. Women with and without MFAs are eligible, and graduate students who are currently enrolled in a degree program are now eligible to apply for a fellowship. Unfortunately, the Blue Sky Retreat grounds do not support wheelchairs or walkers. We are making every effort to secure a location for 2019 that is both cost-effective and accessible.

SUBMISSION FEE: $35

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: April 1, 2018
  • Notifications: By June 1, 2018
  • Retreat Dates: October 13 – 27, 2018

jackjonesliteraryarts.com/the-retreat/ 

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS -- ESSAYS

Electric Literature

INFO: Electric Literature considers personal and critical essays, as well as humor that reflects on the world of reading, writing, literature, and storytelling in all its forms. We’re particularly interested in pieces that examine the intersection of the literary world and other creative disciplines: film, fine art, music, video games, architecture — you name it.

Payment for essays is $50. Length is up to you, but they suggest aiming for 1,500–4, 

DEADLINE: April 13, 2018 

electricliterature.com/submit-ebdd3b73083a

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

MacDowell Colony

INFO: The MacDowell Colony is the nation’s leading artist colony. The Colony nurtures the arts by offering creative individuals of the highest talent an inspiring environment in which they can produce enduring works of the imagination. 

Each year about 300 Fellowships, or residencies, are awarded to artists in seven disciplines: architecture, film/video arts, interdisciplinary arts, literature, music composition, theatre, and visual arts. A Fellowship consists of exclusive use of a private studio, accommodations, and three prepared meals a day for two weeks to two months. MacDowell does not offer classes or instruction.

MacDowell encourages applications from artists representing the widest possible range of perspectives and demographics.

DEADLINE: April 15, 2018

macdowellcolony.org/apply

 

REDIVIDER JOURNAL

Beacon Street Prize

INFO: Redivider is accepting submissions of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry for the 2018 Beacon Street Prize. 

The NONFICTION category will be judged by HANIF ABDURRAQIB! Hanif Abdurraqib is a poet, essayist, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His first collection of poems, The Crown Ain’t Worth Much was released in 2016 and was nominated for the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award. His first collection of essays, They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us, was released in fall 2017 by Two Dollar Radio.

The POETRY category will be judged by KHADIJAH QUEEN! Khadijah Queen is the author of five books, most recently I’m So Fine: A List of Famous Men & What I Had On (YesYes Books 2017). Earlier poetry collections include Conduit (Akashic / Black Goat 2008), Black Peculiar (Noemi Press 2011) and Fearful Beloved (Argos Books 2015). Her verse play Non-Sequitur (Litmus Press 2015) won the Leslie Scalapino Award for Innovative Women’s Performance Writing. The prize included a full staged production of the play at Theaterlab NYC from December 10 – 20, 2015 by Fiona Templeton’s The Relationship theater company. Individual poems and prose appear in Fence, Tin House, Buzzfeed, Gulf Coast, Poor Claudia, Memoir, Best American Nonrequired ReadingDIAGRAM and widely elsewhere. Reviews of her work can be found in The New YorkerRain TaxiBOMB MagazineLos Angeles Review, Kenyon Review, Boston Review, and other publications, and she has performed her work nationally for more than a decade. Queen serves as core faculty in poetry and playwriting for the new Mile-High MFA in creative writing at Regis University, and is a Visiting Professor at University of Colorado, Boulder.

The FICTION category will be judged by ADAM JOHNSON! Adam Johnson is a Professor of English with emphasis in creative writing at Stanford University. Winner of a Whiting Award and Fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts and the American Academy in Berlin, he is the author of several books, including Fortune Smiles, which won the 2015 National Book Award, and the novel The Orphan Master’s Son, which was awarded the 2013 Pulitzer Prize. His fiction has appeared in Esquire, GQ, Playboy, Harper’s Magazine, Granta, Tin House and The Best American Short Stories. His work has been translated into more than thirty languages.

GUIDELINES: 1 short story of 8,000 words max for fiction; 1 essay of 8,000 words max for nonfiction; three (3) poems max in a single file for poetry

PRIZES:

  • $1,000 prize for fiction
  • $1,000 for nonfiction
  • $1,000 for poetry 

SUBMISSION FEE: $10 per entry

DEADLINE: April 15, 2018

redividerjournal.org/submit/contests/beacon-street-prize/ 

 

WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE

The Kerouac Project

INFO: The Kerouac Project provides four residencies a year to writers of any stripe or age, living anywhere in the world. In the past they have accepted writers with no formal writing education alongside those with MFA’s and impressive résumés. You will be judged on the quality of the writing sample you submit. Each residency consists of approximately a three-month stay in the cottage where Jack Kerouac wrote his novel Dharma Bums. As writer-in-residence, all you are required to do is live in the Kerouac House during your residency, work on your writing project, and participate in two events—a Welcome Potluck dinner for you, and a Final Reading of your work at the Kerouac House at the end of your residency. Should you desire them, the Kerouac Project can also offer opportunities for you to participate in other readings, lead workshops, and interact in other ways with the vibrant Central Florida literary community.

You will be required to select a category into which your submission fits. The categories are: Poetry, Play, Screenplay, Fiction/Short Story, and Nonfiction.

STIPEND: Utilities and a food stipend of $1,000 are included.

RESIDENCY SLOTS:

  • Fall 2018: September 1 through November 22, 2018
  • Winter 2018–2019: December 1, 2018, through February 21, 2019
  • Spring 2019: March 1 through May 23, 2019
  • Summer 2019: June 1 through August 22, 2019 

SUBMISSION FEE: $30

DEADLINE: April 16, 2018

kerouacproject.org/submissions/

 

EDITORIAL INTERNSHIPS AT THE NATION

The Nation Institute

INFO: For more than three decades The Nation Institute, in conjunction with The Nation magazine, has provided an internship program for early-career journalists interested in journalism and publishing.

Editorial interns experience a comprehensive immersion into The Nation and TheNation.com’s editorial processes. These interns' primary responsibilities include fact-checking for the magazine and website, providing research support to Nation writers and editors, and assisting bloggers on TheNation.com. Interns are not expected to arrive with fact-checking or digital media experience and will be extensively trained in those areas, though a familiarity with The Nation and the range of issues we cover is essential. These interns are based in the magazine's New York City offices.

Editorial Internship at the Investigative Fund:

The Don and Doris Shaffer Intern is dedicated to working with the Nation Institute's Investigative Fund, assisting in the creation and distribution of long-form investigative pieces that appear in a wide variety of media outlets. This intern will conduct research for reporters and editors, do in-depth fact-checking, and assist with push-out on stories. This intern also occasionally works on Institute-related projects and is based at the Institute’s New York City offices.

All interns participate in educational seminars with journalists, academics, and activists who come by our offices to speak to interns about their work. Recent guests have included Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner, author and critic Vivian Gornick, Nation Institute fellow Sharif Abdel Kouddous, national correspondent for The Atlantic Ta-Nehisi Coates, and New Yorker staff writer Rachel Aviv. Interns are encouraged to suggest people they would like to come in and speak with the group.

The internship is full-time, five days a week.

COMPENSATION & CREDIT: Interns are paid $15 per hour, $525 per week. Whenever possible, The Nation Institute will assist interns in arranging for academic or work-study credit. 

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Application deadline: April 16, 2018
  • Notification deadline: May 11, 2018
  • Program duration: June 26 - December 21, 2018

nationinstitute.org/internships/1000/

 

THE PEN PARENTIS WRITING FELLOWSHIP FOR NEW PARENTS

INFO: In addition to a full year of promotion and the publication of the winning story by Brain, Child Magazine, a $1000 prize will be presented to the new Pen Parentis Writing Fellow at a public reading of the winning work at our September Salon Season Opener in Manhattan.

Entrants must be the parent of at least one child under 10 years of age, but there are no style or genre limitations on the works of fiction submitted for consideration. Entrants can be at any level of their literary careers.

ENTRY FEE: $15

DEADLINE: April 17, 2018

penparentis.org/fellowships/guidelines/

 

MVICW PARENT-WRITER FELLOWSHIP

The Martha's Vineyard Institute of Creative Writing

INFO: The Martha’s Vineyard Institute of Creative Writing was founded in order to give writers the opportunity to develop their craft among established authors. The Institute offers a comprehensive week-long focus on writing, providing writers with the necessary time to devote to their art, in the idyllic setting of the Vineyard. Each summer, we invite award-winning authors and poets, literary journal editors, and university creative writing faculty from around the country to lead writing workshops, work one-on-one with individuals, and provide the necessary tips and tools for editing and publishing.

They are proud to announce the MVICW Parent-Writer Fellowships (est. in 2016 thanks to support from The Sustainable Arts Foundation). Writers who are also parents have increased difficulties in making time for their writing. Their Parent-Writer Fellowships are intended to give parents both the time and financial support to devote a week to themselves and their writing at MVICW. These fellowships offer funding to attend a week of choice at the Martha's Vineyard Institute of Creative Writing. The fellowships are open to anyone who has a child age 16 or younger living with them.

AWARD:

  • Five Full Fellowships: $1600 (Tuition & Lodging for the Week): Two Poetry, Two Fiction/CNF, One Poetry or Fiction/CNF
  • Two Runner-Up Fellowships: $500 each (Towards Tuition): Poetry and Fiction/CNF

GUIDELINES:

  • Poetry: Submit your best poem (1-3 pages) and a letter of interest.
  • Prose: Submit your best short fiction, novel excerpt, or creative non-fiction piece (up to 3000 words) and a letter of interest

DEADLINE: April 21, 2018

mvicw.com/fellowshipinfo

 

SUMMER WORKSHOP

Tin House

INFO: The Tin House Summer Workshop is a weeklong intensive of workshops, seminars, panels, and readings led by prominent contemporary writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. The program combines morning workshops with afternoon seminars and career panels. Evenings are reserved for author readings, singing, and dancing.

Workshops meet for six sessions, Monday through Saturday, from 9:30 am until 12:30 pm. Each workshop will have no more than twelve students and will treat two manuscripts per session. Each student will meet with their faculty instructor for a 15-minute one-on-one meeting during the week.

Tin House editors and guest agents are available to meet individually with students throughout the week.

For students who have completed a collection of stories or poems, a memoir, or a novel, one-on-one mentorships are available with select faculty and staff for an additional fee.

The Workshop will take place at Reed College, located on 100 acres of rolling lawns, winding lanes, and magnificent old trees in the southeast area of Portland, Oregon, just minutes from downtown and twelve miles from the airport.

Summer Workshop participants are housed in the dormitories of Reed College near the center of campus. Unless requested, all rooms are singles, with shared bathrooms (private stalls) on each floor. ADA accessible rooms are available.

All classrooms, readings, panel presentations, dining and reception areas are within walking distance from the dormitories.

Meals are served in the dining area of the college and are catered by Bon Appetit, and we work closely with them in the hopes that all dietary requirements and restrictions are accounted for and that participants’ needs are met. Students not staying with us on campus need to pay for meals individually.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:

  • Short Fiction/Nonfiction - One writing sample of no more than 5,000 words.
  • Novel - One excerpt (from the project you will be workshopping from) of no more than 5,000 words.
  • Poetry - Up to four poems.

If you have been accepted into a Tin House workshop previously, please do not apply with the same application material. You are free to excerpt from the same project.

Please do not apply with published material. However, it is acceptable to apply with work that is out for submission.

If accepted, you will have the opportunity to switch your manuscript. 

DEADLINE: April 29, 2018

tinhouse.com/summer-workshop/

 

ARTIST FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM       

The Jerome Foundation

INFO: The Jerome Foundation is pleased to announce the first round of a new Artist Fellowship program that offers flexible, two-year grants to support the creative development of early-career generative artists in the state of Minnesota and the five boroughs of New York City. Artists may apply individually or together with other members of ongoing collectives or ensembles.

The Jerome Foundation makes a distinction between generative artists (those artists responsible for artistic control in generating entirely new work, including writers, choreographers, film directors, visual artists, composers, playwrights, etc.) and interpretive artists (those who interpret or execute the work created by others, including actors, editors, dramaturgs, singers, dancers, musicians, designers, etc.). The Foundation recognizes that some artists do both generative and interpretive work. Nevertheless, the Fellowship program supports only those artists with a significant history of generative work.

All eligible applicants must have a history of making and presenting new work to the public beyond student work (if the applicant has pursued formal training). While an applicant’s past projects are reviewed as part of the selection process, the program’s primary focus is supporting an artist’s future potential through the creation of new work or activities that support professional development and/or career advancement.

The Foundation will make 10 grants in each of six categories:

  • Dance
  • Literature (fiction, creative non-fiction and poetry)
  • ·Media—including Film, Video and Digital Production (documentary, narrative, animation, or experimental) and New Media (artistic work that is computational and distributed digitally, in the form of websites, mobile apps, virtual worlds, computer games, human-computer interface or interactive computer installations)
  • Music
  • Theater, Performance and Spoken Word
  • Visual arts

Artists whose work spans multiple disciplines may request to be reviewed in two different disciplines. The Foundation reserves the right, however, to direct such applications to a single panel.

AWARD: Each fellow will receive $20,000 per year for two consecutive years, making the total cash award $40,000 over the two-year period. Individual artists may petition the Foundation to reduce the award amount but must present specific, compelling reasons to do so. Artists applying as part of a collective or ensemble will share one $20,000 per year award.

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Application Period:  Now through May 8, 2018 at 4pm Central / 5pm Eastern Time
  • Notification of grant awards: By April 15, 2019
  • Earliest Date to Receive Funds: May 8, 2019

jeromefdn.org/apply/artist-fellowship

FICTION / NONFICTION -- MARCH 2018

SUMMER WORKSHOP

Tin House

INFO: The Tin House Summer Workshop is a weeklong intensive of workshops, seminars, panels, and readings led by prominent contemporary writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. The program combines morning workshops with afternoon seminars and career panels. Evenings are reserved for author readings, singing, and dancing.

Workshops meet for six sessions, Monday through Saturday, from 9:30 am until 12:30 pm. Each workshop will have no more than twelve students and will treat two manuscripts per session. Each student will meet with their faculty instructor for a 15-minute one-on-one meeting during the week.

Tin House editors and guest agents are available to meet individually with students throughout the week.

For students who have completed a collection of stories or poems, a memoir, or a novel, one-on-one mentorships are available with select faculty and staff for an additional fee.

The Workshop will take place at Reed College, located on 100 acres of rolling lawns, winding lanes, and magnificent old trees in the southeast area of Portland, Oregon, just minutes from downtown and twelve miles from the airport.

Summer Workshop participants are housed in the dormitories of Reed College near the center of campus. Unless requested, all rooms are singles, with shared bathrooms (private stalls) on each floor. ADA accessible rooms are available.

All classrooms, readings, panel presentations, dining and reception areas are within walking distance from the dormitories.

Meals are served in the dining area of the college and are catered by Bon Appetit, and we work closely with them in the hopes that all dietary requirements and restrictions are accounted for and that participants’ needs are met. Students not staying with us on campus need to pay for meals individually.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:

  • Short Fiction/Nonfiction - One writing sample of no more than 5,000 words.
  • Novel - One excerpt (from the project you will be workshopping from) of no more than 5,000 words.
  • Poetry - Up to four poems.

If you have been accepted into a Tin House workshop previously, please do not apply with the same application material. You are free to excerpt from the same project.

Please do not apply with published material. However, it is acceptable to apply with work that is out for submission.

If accepted, you will have the opportunity to switch your manuscript. 

APPLICATION PERIOD: March 1 – April 29, 2018

tinhouse.com/summer-workshop/

 

WRITING EXCUSES RETREAT SCHOLARSHIP

INFO: The sixth annual Writing Excuses Workshop and Retreat makes a triumphant return to the Caribbean Sea! We begin in Houston, TX, on September 22; we’ll visit Roatan, Belize City, and Cozumel; and then we’ll end up back in Houston again on September 30. You can find all the other info, including our incredible guest list, here.

We are also delighted to report that we are offering more scholarships in 2018 than ever before: five! One of these is sponsored by the hosts of Writing Excuses, one by our amazing patrons on Patreon, and three (3) by our incredibly awesome alumni. They’ve been on the retreat (sometimes more than once), they love it, and they want to share it with as many people as possible.

As always, our scholarships come in two categories: three Out of Excuses Scholarships, awarded to those in financial need, and two Carl Brandon Society Scholarships, awarded to writers of color. Both categories have introduced us to some incredible writers in the past, and we can’t wait to see who we get to meet this year. Share this post with everyone you know, read the rules carefully, and apply!

ENTRY RULES: Each scholarship offers full tuition, $500 of travel expenses, a bed in a double occupancy room on the ship, and hotel expenses in Houston for one night both pre- and post-cruise. Because the food on the cruise is free, this covers essentially all your expenses for the week, though depending on the flights you arrange, you might need to cover some of the travel yourself. You may apply to either scholarship, but only to one of them (even if you qualify for both).

These scholarships are very popular, and get a lot of applicants, so please read the instructions carefully and follow them exactly; incomplete applications will be disqualified.

To apply, please prepare the following scholarship package as a Word document, and send it to writingexcusesscholarship@gmail.com with the subject line: “Scholarship Application: [name of scholarship].” Please copy and paste the cover sheet to the main body of the email, and also include it as the first page in the package.

DEADLINE: March 12, 2018

writingexcuses.com/2018/01/16/applications-are-open-for-the-2018-writing-excuses-retreat-scholarship/

 

2018 KIMBILIO SUMMER RETREAT

INFO: Writers from the African diaspora are invited to apply for a Kimbilio Fellowship.

In addition to an invitation to the annual retreat, new Fellows become a part of an engaged and growing community of fiction writers who are excited about the future of diaspora literature and about contributing their own outstanding writing to the mix.

In general, our Fellows are writers who have focused seriously on their craft for some period of time and can hold their own at the workshop table with like-minded, well prepared, and talented peers.  Most are emerging writers at early stages in their careers, but many are already well-published and become Fellows because they wish to become a part of this vital community and these important conversations.  Does this describe you?  If so, we encourage you to apply now.

DEADLINE: March 15, 2018

kimbiliosubmissions.submittable.com/submit

 

JAMES JONES FELLOWSHIP CONTEST

Wilkes University

INFO: The 27th Annual James Jones First Novel Fellowship will be awarded to an American author of a first novel-in-progress, in 2018, by the James Jones Literary Society.

The award is intended to honor the spirit of unblinking honesty, determination, and insight into cultural and social issues exemplified by the late James Jones, author of From Here to Eternity and other prose narratives of distinction.

Jones himself was the recipient of aid from many supporters as a young writer and his family, friends, and admirers have established this award of $10,000 to continue the tradition in his name. Two runners up awards of $1000 each may be given by the Jones Literary Society.  All selections are at the discretion of the judges.

SUBMISSION FEE: A $30 check/money order, payable to Wilkes University, not to James Jones First Novel Fellowship, must accompany each entry.  For online submissions there is an additional $3.00 processing fee.

DEADLINE: March 15, 2018 at midnight EST

wilkes.edu/academics/graduate-programs/masters-programs/creative-writing-ma-mfa/james-jones-fellowship-contest.aspx

 

PAPER DARTS SHORT FICTION AWARD

INFO: Carmen Maria Machado is judging this year's Paper Darts Short Fiction Award. Word limit is 1,200.

AWARD: $500

SUBMISSION FEE: $6

 DEADLINE: March 15, 2018

paperdarts.org/blog/2018/1/15/introducing-the-paper-darts-short-fiction-award-judged-by-carmen-maria-machado

 

ASIAN WOMEN GIVING CIRCLE

INFO: Asian Women Giving Circle (AWGC) believes culture is an essential part of any strategy for social change. We support Asian American women-led organizations and individual artists in NYC who are using arts and culture to:

  • bring about progressive social transformation,
  • raise awareness and catalyze action around critical issues that affect Asian American women, girls and families, and
  • highlight and promote women’s central role as leaders, creators, developers and managers of these projects.

In this grants cycle, we anticipate that 5-8 project grants will be awarded, contingent on available funding. The maximum grant amount is $15,000. For a description of past project grants, please visit our website: www.asianwomengivingcircle.org

Founded in 2005, the AWGC is a collaboration of Asian American women in New York City who are passionate about amplifying the transformative power of arts and culture to bring about progressive change. We promote grassroots philanthropy and pool our resources to fund projects led by Asian American women who use their creativity to move hearts, minds and communities to be free of fear, bias and injustice.

AWGC is the first and largest giving circle in the nation led by Asian American women. Asian Americans are the fastest growing racial and ethnic group in New York City (comprising 14% of the population) yet our communities receive less than 1% of philanthropic dollars. Our goals are to:

  • Channel more resources into our local communities
  • Engage more people to invest in creative projects by and for our communities
  • Shine an authentic spotlight on our experiences and stories
  • Promote progressive social change
  • Raise the visibility of Asian American women doing philanthropic work

All donors to the giving circle are invited to vote on the projects they wish to see funded. The AWGC Steering Committee is a group of approximately 25 diverse Asian American women who lead the grantmaking and fundraising efforts of the giving circle.  We are a donor-advised fund at the Ms. Foundation for Women, which distributes our funds solely at our direction.

AWGC funds individual artists and community groups whose projects contribute to progressive social and political change. Since our founding, we have raised and awarded over $850,000 in support of over 80 projects.

DEADLINE: March 16, 2018

forwomen.org/grants-2/awgc-2018-rfp/

 

MARCUS GARVEY FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIPS

Emory University

Jean Harvey Slappy Research Fellowship

This fellowship -- named in honor of long-time Marcus Garvey Foundation board member Jean Harvey Slappy -- looks to support doctoral candidates working on aspects of the history of the U.N.I.A. (Universal Negro Improvement Association), the A.C.L. (African Communities League), and/or Marcus Garvey's organizational activities, and who wish to use the Thomas W. Harvey/U.N.I.A. collection located at the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library. Research fellows receive grants of $500 to help defray expenses associated with travel to and use of the archival collection.

Marcus Garvey Foundation Research Fellowship

This fellowship looks to support doctoral candidates doing primary research in the humanities and social sciences on topics related to Africa and the African diaspora. Those doctoral candidates using archival collections and/or conducting oral histories are especially encouraged to apply.  Research fellows receive grants of $500 to help defray research expenses. For more information, click here.

DEADLINE: March 23, 2018

rose.library.emory.edu/research-learning/fellowships-awards/visiting-researchers/subject/garvey.html

 

THE 2018 ELIZA SO FELLOWSHIP

Submittable

INFOSubmittable is thrilled to announce the second annual Eliza So Fellowship, in partnership with The Writer’s Block and Plympton. This month-long residency in Las Vegas will offer award recipients time and solitude to help them finish a book that is already in progress. The program’s inaugural fellow was Melissa Sipin in 2017.

The 2018 fellowships will include room and board at The Writer’s Block, along with a $500 food stipend and $400 toward travel.  They are pleased to expand the program this year to offer two residencies between September and December, and awarded in the following categories:

  • The Eliza So Fellowship for Immigrant Writers
  • The Eliza So Fellowship for Montana Indigenous Writers

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:

  •  You have a novel, collection of stories, memoir, or other prose work (fiction, nonfiction or hybrid) in progress (100 pages minimum) or poetry collection in progress (30 pages minimum)  
  • You are either: a) A US immigrant (documented or undocumented), b) An indigenous writer with significant ties to Montana (either you are from Montana, live in Montana currently, or have another significant affiliation with Montana).

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: March 25, 2018
  • Results Announced: June 1, 2018

blog.submittable.com/2017/12/the-2018-eliza-so-fellowship/

 

WINTER 2018 STORY CONTEST

Narrative Magazine

INFO: The contest is open to all fiction and nonfiction writers. They are looking for short shorts, short stories, essays, memoirs, photo essays, graphic stories, all forms of literary nonfiction, and excerpts from longer works of both fiction and nonfiction. Entries must be previously unpublished, no longer than 15,000 words, and must not have been previously chosen as a winner, finalist, or honorable mention in another contest.

Narrative winners and finalists have gone on to win the Pushcart Prize, the Whiting Award, and the Atlantic Prize, and have appeared in the Best American Short Stories, the Best American Nonrequired Reading, and others. View all the recent awards won by Narrative authors.

AWARDS:

  • First Prize is $2,500
  • Second Prize is $1,000
  • Third Prize is $500
  • Ten finalists will receive $100 each.
  • All entries will be considered for publication.

SUBMISSION FEE: $26 for each entry. And with your entry, you’ll receive three months of complimentary access to Narrative Backstage.

DEADLINE: March 31, 2018, at midnight PT

narrativemagazine.com/winter-2018-story-contest

 

2018 GRACE PALEY TEACHING FELLOWSHIP

New School

INFO: Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at the New School is welcoming applications for the second annual Grace Paley Teaching Fellowship, a semester-long residency in the First-Year Writing Program. The Fellowship will honor a writer of considerable achievement, in any genre, whose work also reveals a concern for social justice.

The Grace Paley Fellow will teach a first-year essay-writing seminar for 15 incoming undergraduate students. Classes meet twice per week throughout the Fall 2018 semester. In addition to the course, over the semester the Paley Fellow will deliver one public craft lecture, offer one public reading of new work, and participate in at least three informal lunch-time writing seminars where faculty take up various themes and topics of interest from our classes. The Fellow will also deliver a talk during the 2018 orientation for all incoming New School students and will be invited to deliver the keynote address at the spring 2019 Scholastic Writing Awards.

The Fellow works closely with the Director of First-Year Writing and other faculty to discuss pedagogy, grading, and assessment (including student preparedness for more advanced writing courses).

The Grace Paley Teaching Fellowship is open to writers in any genre (nonfiction, fiction, poetry, drama) whose work demonstrates a concern for social justice.

Applicants should have published at least two book-length works. These books, combined with additional publications, should demonstrate considerable achievement in the writer’s field and engagement with the world at large.

The New School is committed to creating and maintaining an environment that promises diversity and tolerance in all areas of employment, education and access to its educational, artistic or cultural programs and activities. The New School does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, creed, sex or gender (including gender identity and expression), pregnancy, sexual orientation, religion, religious practices, mental or physical disability, national or ethnic origin, citizenship status, veteran status, marital or partnership status, or any other legally protected status.

AWARD: The Fellowship offers a $25,000 stipend and is located in New York City.

DEADLINE: April 1, 2018

portfolio.newschool.edu/firstyearwriting/2017/12/15/2018-grace-paley-teaching-fellowship/

 

ARTIST FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM       

The Jerome Foundation

INFO: The Jerome Foundation is pleased to announce the first round of a new Artist Fellowship program that offers flexible, two-year grants to support the creative development of early-career generative artists in the state of Minnesota and the five boroughs of New York City. Artists may apply individually or together with other members of ongoing collectives or ensembles.

The Jerome Foundation makes a distinction between generative artists (those artists responsible for artistic control in generating entirely new work, including writers, choreographers, film directors, visual artists, composers, playwrights, etc.) and interpretive artists (those who interpret or execute the work created by others, including actors, editors, dramaturgs, singers, dancers, musicians, designers, etc.). The Foundation recognizes that some artists do both generative and interpretive work. Nevertheless, the Fellowship program supports only those artists with a significant history of generative work.

All eligible applicants must have a history of making and presenting new work to the public beyond student work (if the applicant has pursued formal training). While an applicant’s past projects are reviewed as part of the selection process, the program’s primary focus is supporting an artist’s future potential through the creation of new work or activities that support professional development and/or career advancement.

The Foundation will make 10 grants in each of six categories:

  • Dance
  • Literature (fiction, creative non-fiction and poetry)
  • ·Media—including Film, Video and Digital Production (documentary, narrative, animation, or experimental) and New Media (artistic work that is computational and distributed digitally, in the form of websites, mobile apps, virtual worlds, computer games, human-computer interface or interactive computer installations)
  • Music
  • Theater, Performance and Spoken Word
  • Visual arts

Artists whose work spans multiple disciplines may request to be reviewed in two different disciplines. The Foundation reserves the right, however, to direct such applications to a single panel.

AWARD: Each fellow will receive $20,000 per year for two consecutive years, making the total cash award $40,000 over the two-year period. Individual artists may petition the Foundation to reduce the award amount but must present specific, compelling reasons to do so. Artists applying as part of a collective or ensemble will share one $20,000 per year award.

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Application Period:  Now through May 8, 2018 at 4pm Central / 5pm Eastern Time
  • Notification of grant awards: By April 15, 2019
  • Earliest Date to Receive Funds: May 8, 2019

jeromefdn.org/apply/artist-fellowship

FICTION / NONFICTION -- FEBRUARY 2018

ANISFIELD-WOLF FELLOWSHIP IN WRITING & PUBLISHING

Cleveland State University Poetry Center

INFO: The Cleveland State University Poetry Center is accepting applications for the Anisfield-Wolf Fellowship in Writing & Publishing, a two-year post-graduate fellowship that offers an emerging writer time to work toward a first or second book and an opportunity to gain experience in editing, publishing, literary programming, and outreach in collaboration with the staff of the CSU Poetry Center.

The CSU Poetry Center is a 55+-year-old independent nonprofit press that publishes 3–5 books of contemporary poetry, prose, and translation each year. The Poetry Center also hosts the Lighthouse Reading Series and serves as a teaching lab for undergraduate and graduate students at Cleveland State University and within the Northeast Ohio MFA program. The Fellow will be a two-year employee of the CSU English department. The salary is $40,000 per year with health insurance and benefits.

The fellowship will encompass two academic-year (9-month) residencies of 30 hours per week, divided between writing, work at the CSU Poetry Center, and an outreach project of the Fellow’s own design. Poetry Center work will include reviewing submissions, attending editorial meetings, and assisting with Center contests. Possible outreach projects include (but are not limited to): developing an anthology incorporating authors from an underrepresented community; organizing community writing workshops; developing a reading series to engage previously underserved communities; or working with a local organization involved in education, social justice, and the literary arts. The project should be designed and completed in the two years in which the Fellow is in residence. It is expected that this work will further engage an already enthusiastic writing community at Cleveland State University and throughout Cleveland. Additional professional development opportunities for the Fellow will include participation in Cleveland Book Week and public readings of their work for the Cleveland literary community.

This fellowship is named for and supported by the Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards, which honor literature that promotes equity and social justice and are administered through the Cleveland Foundation. Through the creation of this fellowship, Anisfield-Wolf and the CSU Poetry Center hope to support writers from backgrounds and with perspectives historically underrepresented in publishing and creative writing programming. By providing editorial experience and opportunities at a literary press, the fellowship also aims to help address the longstanding lack of diversity in the U.S. publishing workforce.

Cleveland poet and philanthropist Edith Anisfield Wolf established the book awards in 1935 in honor of her father, John Anisfield, and husband, Eugene Wolf, to reflect her family’s passion for social justice and the rich diversity of human cultures. Founded with a focus on combating racism in America, the Anisfield-Wolf Awards today maintain that commitment to equity and justice in an expanded, global context. Recent winners, for example, have also addressed religious identity, immigrant experiences, LGBTQ+ history, and the lives of people with disabilities.

DEADLINE: February 1, 2017

csupoetrycenter.com/news-1/2017/12/13/anisfield-wolf-fellowship-in-writing-publishing

 

U.S.-JAPAN CREATIVE ARTISTS EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIPS

Japan-United States Friendship Commission

INFO: The Japan U.S. Friendship Commission offers leading contemporary and traditional artists from the United States the opportunity to spend three to five months in Japan through the U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Program.  Artists go as seekers, as cultural visionaries, and as living liaisons to the traditional and contemporary cultural life of Japan.  They also go as connectors who share knowledge and bring back knowledge. Their interaction with the Japanese public and the outlook they bring home provide exceptional opportunities to promote cultural understanding between the United States and Japan.

Since 1978, the Japan-US Friendship Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) have worked  with the Agency for Cultural Affairs in Japan and the International House of Japan (I-House) to organize the United States-Japan Creative Artists’ Program. Each year five leading U.S.-based artists, representing all genres, are selected from the United States and are provided funding to spend three months in Japan.

This residency program allows the artists to research and experience both the traditional and contemporary artistic milieu of Japan. Artists are free to live anywhere in the country to pursue activities of greatest relevance to their creative process. While many artists chose to remain in Tokyo, others live in Kyoto or other cities, and still others work in rural settings or travel around the countryside. The International House of Japan provides in-depth orientation materials, expert advice and professional contacts, as well as logistical support during the residency period.

Primary Eligibility:

  • Candidates must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States.
  • Candidates must live and work professionally primarily in the United States.
  • Candidates must be professional creative artists (contemporary or traditional) working as: architects, choreographers, composers, creative writers, designers, media artists, playwrights, librettists, visual artists and solo theater artists who work with original material (including puppeteers, and performance artists). For additional eligibility requirements, please click here.

AWARD: A grant award of $20,000 for three months, and $28,000 for up to five months will be provided to each artist to cover housing, living and professional expenses.  Artists will be responsible for converting their U.S. Dollar award into Japanese Yen.  The Commission will also provide grantees up to $2,000 to cover the cost of their round-trip transportation to Japan.

DEADLINE: February 1, 2018 at 11:59 EST

jusfc.gov/creative-artists-programs/

 

CREATIVE WRITING FELLOWSHIP

Luminarts

INFO: The Creative Writing Fellowship awards five $5,000 Luminarts Fellowships for excellence in creative writing in the categories or prose and poetry. Applicants submit a two-page written piece (either a stand-alone piece or an excerpt of a larger piece such as a novel or short story). Entries are submitted and reviewed by an initial panel of jurors. Once reviewed, all top entries go to the final juror panel and the winners are selected. Jurors are comprised of professional authors, novelists, and poets, literary contributors, publishers, editors, journalists and media contributors.

Fellowship applicants must be between the ages of 18 and 30, live within 150 miles of the Chicago Loop, and be enrolled in, or graduated from, a degree program, or other professional artist development program. 

DEADLINE: February 9, 2018

luminarts.org/creative-writing-opportunities

 

AMBROGGIO PRIZE

Academy of American Poets

INFO: The Ambroggio Prize is a $1,000 publication prize given for a book-length poetry manuscript originally written in Spanish and with an English translation. The winning manuscript is published by Bilingual Press/Editorial Bilingüe, publisher of literary works, scholarship, and art books by or about U.S. Hispanics. Established in 2017, the Ambroggio Prize is the only annual award of its kind in the United States that honors American poets whose first language is Spanish.

The judge for the 2018 Ambroggio Prize is Alberto Ríos.

DEADLINE: February 15, 2018

poets.org/academy-american-poets/prizes/ambroggio-prize

 

ARTISTS RESIDENCY

Mineral School

INFO: Mineral School is an artists residency located in a former 1947 elementary school near Mt. Rainier, in Mineral, Washington. During summer 2018, we're offering three two-week residency periods to 8 writers of poetry and prose and 4 visual artists, providing accepted applicants with space and time to create new work without the interruptions of normal life and with the bonus of healthy meals prepared by culinary volunteers using locally-grown organic food whenever possible. During September 2018, we'll offer a one-week residency to 4 writers who are parents of children under 18. 

Each resident will live in an 800-square foot former classroom that offers peekaboo views of Mineral Lake and Mt. Rainier, and that will double as their writing studio, with desk and chair, lighting, bookcase, and lots of chalkboards. Visual artist residents will be offered space to work outside of their classrooms (unless they wish to work in their medium in the room where they sleep). The school building has bathrooms with showers. Residents are served all meals and snacks daily and have the opportunity to share work with the public. Mineral features a swimmable fishing lake and boat rentals, a bar, a bed and breakfast, a general store, churches, a post office, and more deer than people. It's 25 minutes by car to Mt. Rainier National Park.

Visiting authors and artists: During each two-week residency, resident alumnae will visit and present work and bring with them a special guest artist they've chosen to introduce to Mineral. Additionally, during June's residency there will be a free musical event onsite on the last night, Saturday, June 30, by the Portland band Swimfish.

Resident presentations: If they wish, residents can share with one another and the public at our monthly residents' "show and tell" held during residency. These presentations are held after dinner in our library/multi-purpose room.

Notification will be given at least two months before the residency period for which you've applied. Residency sessions are held during the following time periods.  

Two-week residency periods for 2018:

  • June 17-July 1
  • July 15-July 29
  • August 19-September 2

One-week parents' residency

  • September 15-September 23

DEADLINE: February 15, 2018

mineralschool.submittable.com/submit 

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSION: ISSUE 3

The Shanghai Literary Review

INFO: The Shanghai Literary Review accepts submissions for web and print on a rolling basis. They are interested in art and criticism about urbanism, globalism, identity, and transnationalism, though by no means should submissions be limited to those topics. Selected works will be published in print, and with a delay, also online. They strongly urge submitters to check out their TSLR Online section on this site or view back issues of the magazine to get a sense of what they are looking for.

They publish: 

  • Fiction - less than 5,000 words
  • Poetry - 2 poems submission limit per person
  • Nonfiction & Essay - less than 5,000 words
  • Flash Fiction or Nonfiction - less than 500 words
  • Visual Art - photography, video, photo essay, collage, painting, sketch, etc.
  • Translation - translation into English of any poetry, essay or short fiction from Asia, or vice versa, along with the original text
  • Book Review - pitch book review ideas to us, on fiction or non-fiction from or about Asia

DEADLINE: February 15, 2018

shanghailiterary.com/submissions/

  

NYC EMERGING WRITERS FELLOWSHIP

The Center for Fiction

INFO: This program is generously funded by a grant from the Jerome Foundation, matched by additional funds from individuals. We will be selecting nine writers in 2018 and during the one-year fellowship period grantees will receive:

  • A grant of $5,000
  • The option to engage in a mentorship with a selected freelance editor
  • The opportunity to meet with agents who represent new writers
  • Free admission to all Center events for one year, including tickets to our First Novel Fete and benefit dinner as space allows
  • 30% discount on tuition at select writing workshops at the Center
  • Two public readings as part of our annual program of events and inclusion in an anthology distributed to industry professionals
  • A professional headshot with a photographer for personal publicity use

CRITERIA: Applicants must be current residents of one of the five boroughs, and must remain in New York City for the entire year of the fellowship. Students in degree-granting programs are not eligible to apply, even if the focus of study is not directly related to writing. This program supports emerging writers whose work shows promise of excellence. Applicants can be of any age, but must be in the early stages of their careers as fiction writers and will not have had the support needed to achieve major recognition for their work. We define “emerging writer” as someone who has not yet had a novel or short story collection published by either a major or independent publisher and who is also not currently under contract to a publisher for a work of fiction. Eligible applicants may have had stories or novel excerpts published in magazines, literary journals or online, but this is not a requirement. If at any point during the judging process an applicant signs a contract for publication or accepts an offer to study in a degree-granting program, he or she must alert us immediately to have the application pulled from consideration.

DEADLINE: February 15, 2018 by 11pm

centerforfiction.org/forwriters/grants-and-awards/?mc_cid=a33e86b186&mc_eid=591acda9d1

 

THE BREAKOUT EIGHT WRITERS PRIZE

Epiphany / The Authors Guild

INFO: Epiphany is partnering with the Authors Guild to honor and support outstanding emerging literary voices and bring visibility to the writers of our future by choosing eight breakout student writers

PRIZE: Eight writers will receive publication in Epiphany's Breakout Eight special issue; a $250 cash prize; a year-long mentorship with Epiphany editor-in-chief, 2015 National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree, and 2012 Center for Fiction fellow Tracy O'Neill; a complimentary one-year student membership to the Authors Guild, including free access to seminars, webinars, and the writers’ resource library; a featured interview published on the Epiphany website, in the Authors Guild Bulletin, and on the Authors Guild website; a one-year subscription to Epiphany; and a short manuscript review. 

Candidates must be enrolled in an accredited university at least part-time for the academic year Fall 2017­–Spring 2018.The prize is open to both graduate and undergraduate students. Students need not be enrolled in MFA programs or creative writing programs.

Honorees will be selected blind on the basis of the work’s creative merit by a judging panel made up of Alexander Chee and Hannah Tinti, and Epiphany Editor-in-Chief Tracy O’Neill.

DEADLINE: February 15, 2018

epiphanyzine.com/breakout-8

 

VISITING FELLOWSHIP

American Library in Paris

INFO: The Visiting Fellowship offers writers and researchers an opportunity to pursue a creative project in Paris for a month or longer while participating actively in the life of the American Library. Fellowship applicants should be working on a book project, fiction or non-fiction, or a feature-length documentary film, that contributes to cross-cultural discourse. We are not accepting poetry projects for the present Fellowships.

Particular attention will be paid to a potential fellow’s ability to offer Library members a variety of opportunities for exploring a topic or form. In addition to the stipend, the Library will connect the fellow to resources and people in Paris that could be helpful to his or her project. The Fellowship is open to all English-speakers, regardless of nationality.

The Fellowship is made possible through the generous support of The de Groot Foundation. There are two one-month Fellowship periods a year in fall and spring, with dates to be specified later.

AWARD: A $5,000 stipend paid one month before start of Fellowship period. The award, to be spent at the discretion of the Fellow, is designed to cover travel to Paris, accommodation, and expenses associated with the month in Paris. The Fellowship is open to all nationalities, though the proposed project must be in English.

Visiting Fellows are expected to:

  • Be present in Paris during the period of the Fellowship.
  • Be present in the American Library a minimum of three half-days a week.
  • Present one hour-long evening program at the Library on a mutually agreed upon topic.
  • Participate in a Library reception.
  • Meet with staff informally to explore a topic of mutual interest.
  • Extend the Library’s reach by participating in events arranged by the Library with other organizations in Paris.
  • Provide the Library and the funding foundation with a written report of the Fellowship experience.
  • Appropriately acknowledge the Library and the Visiting Fellowship in publications and print media related to the Fellowship project.
  • Participate in the Library’s social media communication, fundraising campaigns, and other public events.

DEADLINE: February 15, 2018

americanlibraryinparis.org/visiting-fellowship/

 

MACONDO WRITERS WORKSHOP

INFO: The Macondo Workshop is a master’s level workshop, meaning that participants are expected to be established writers capable of reviewing each other’s work with compassionate rigor and vision. In 2018 we will hold three workshops, which meet for four days, three hours each day. We will have fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry workshops. Maximum number of participants in each workshop is 12.

In addition to the morning workshops, afternoon/early evening seminars, open to everyone, give Macondistas a chance to discuss artistic, political, publishing, and other topics related to writing. Events planned throughout the week provide opportunities for Macondistas to visit, get to know each other, and exchange ideas. A large, open mic gathering on one of the evenings brings us all together to read our work and enjoy the company of the larger community. Sandra Cisneros will conduct a fundraiser reading to support the Macondo Writers Workshop on one evening between July 25 and 28.

Texas A&M University-San Antonio has generously offered classroom and performance space and housing in its residence halls at a reduced rate, along with sponsorship of the Welcome Dinner, Final Breakfast, and other services to Macondo participants. We are grateful to University President, Dr. Cindy Teniente-Matson and her wonderful faculty, staff, and students for their commitment to ensuring a successful Macondo workshop.

FEES / TUITION:

  • Application Fee: $25
  • Tuition: $500 tuition, plus additional cost for five nights’ accommodations either arranged on your own or in campus residence halls at a reduced rate. (Actual cost for residence hall accommodations is not expected to exceed $200 for five nights.)

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: February 16, 2018
  • Notification: by March 31, 2018
  • Welcome Dinner: July 24, 2018
  • Workshops: July 25 – 28, 2018
  • Farewell Breakfast: July 29, 2018

lizgonzalez.com/pages/macondo.html

 

2018 VONA / VOICES SUMMER WRITING WORKSHOPS

INFO: Applications for the summer workshop are currently being accepted. VONA/Voices is open to all adult writers-of-color at any level of experience. There are no degree, publication or documentation requirements to apply.

Writers may attend 3 workshops maximum in the same genre or topic. Alums may attend 2 additional workshops in different genres or topics. No more than 3 years may be consecutive.

If you are an Alum of VONA/Voices who has had the maximum number of workshops (5), thank you for making your space available to new members of our community.

FEES / TUITION:

  • Deposit: $200
  • Regular: Weeklong workshop $1,100 
  • Residency: $1,100

IMPORTANT DATES:  

  • Deadline: February 19 at midnight PDT
  • Notification: March 10
  • Waitlist Notifications: by April 1, 2018.
  • Manuscripts uploaded: by May 21
  • All fees due: by June 1
  • Week One Residency: June 17-June 23
  • Week Two Residency: June 24 - June 30, 2018

voicesatvona.submittable.com/submit/101991/2018-vona-voices-summer-writing-workshops

 

2018 AWARD SERIES

Association of Writers & Writing Programs

INFO: AWP’s Award Series is an annual competition for the publication of excellent new book-length works. The competition is open to all authors writing in English regardless of nationality or residence, and it is open to published and unpublished authors alike.

The Award Series conducts an evaluation process of writers, for writers, by writers. AWP hires a staff of “screeners” who are themselves writers; the screeners review manuscripts for the judges. Typically, the screeners will select ten manuscripts in each genre for each judge’s final evaluations.

Eligibility Requirements

Only book-length manuscripts are eligible. The Award Series defines “book-length” as:

  • Poetry: 48 pages minimum text;
  • Short story or creative nonfiction collection: 150–300 manuscript pages; and
  • Novel: at least 60,000 words.

Poems and stories previously published in periodicals are eligible for inclusion in submissions, but manuscripts previously published in their entirety, including self-published manuscripts, are not eligible. As the series is judged anonymously, no list of acknowledgements should accompany your manuscript.

The AWP Award Series is open to all authors writing original works in English for adult readers. Mixed-genre manuscripts cannot be accepted. Criticism and scholarly monographs are not acceptable for creative nonfiction, which the Award Series defines as factual and literary writing that has the narrative, dramatic, meditative, and lyrical elements of novels, plays, poetry, and memoir.

AWARDS:

Donald Hall Prize for Poetry

  • $5,500
  • Judge: Ross A. Gay
  • Publication from the University of Pittsburgh Press

Grace Paley Prize for Short Fiction

  • $5,500
  • Judge: Kelly Link
  • Publication from the University of Massachusetts Press

AWP Prize for the Novel

  • $2,500
  • Judge: Paula McLain
  • Publication from New Issues Press

AWP Prize for Creative Nonfiction

  • $2,500
  • Judge: TBA
  • Publication from the University of Georgia Press

DEADLINE: February 28, 2018

awpwriter.org/contests/awp_award_series_overview

 

CREATIVE CAPITAL AWARD

Creative Capital

INFO: Creative Capital is an impact-driven arts organization that supports adventurous artists across the country through funding, counsel, and career development services.

Their pioneering venture philanthropy approach helps artists working in all creative disciplines realize their visions and build sustainable practices. Creative Capital provides each funded project with up to $50,000 in direct funding and career development services valued at $45,000, for a total commitment of up to $95,000 per project.

In February 2018, they will accept submissions in 34 disciplines. These include works in film, literature, performing arts, visual arts, and a number of other media.

DEADLINE: February 28, 2018

apply.creative-capital.org/

 

PRIZE FOR NEW IMMIGRANT WRITING

Restless Books

INFO: The Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing alternates yearly between accepting unpublished fiction and nonfiction submissions. Fiction submissions can take the form of a novel or a book-length collection of short stories. Nonfiction submissions can take the form of a memoir, a collection of essays, or a book-length work of narrative nonfiction.

Fiction manuscripts must be complete. Nonfiction submissions must consist of either a complete manuscript, or a sample of at least 25,000 words and a detailed proposal that includes a synopsis and an annotated table of contents. All submissions must be in English (translations welcome). 

Candidates must be first-generation residents of their country. “First-generation” can refer either to people born in another country who relocated, or to residents of a country whose parents were born elsewhere.

Fiction candidates must not have previously published a book of fiction with a US publishing house. Nonfiction candidates must not have previously published a book of nonfiction with a US publishing house. We encourage applicants to look at the other titles Restless has published and previous contest winners to get a sense of our aesthetic.

PRIZE: a $10,000 advance and publication by Restless Books in print and digital editions. We expect to work closely with the winner and provide editorial guidance.

DEADLINE: February 28, 2018

restlessbooks.com/prize-for-new-immigrant-writing/ 

 

SELF-PUBLISHING LITERARY AWARDS

Black Caucus of the American Library Association

INFO: The Black Caucus of ALA (BCALA) honors the best self-published ebooks by an African American author in the U.S. in the following genres: Fiction and Poetry. The judging committee will be comprised of a BCALA-appointed panel. They will select one winner in each genre.

PRIZES:

  • Each genre prize winner shall receive: $500.00.
  • Two (2) $500.00 awards: one for adult fiction, one for adult poetry;
  • Formal recognition at the Black Caucus of ALA Literary Awards;
  • BCALA Literary Award Seal to use in marketing.

DEADLINE: February 28, 2018

bcala.org/e-book-award/

 

THE 2018 ELIZA SO FELLOWSHIP

Submittable

INFOSubmittable is thrilled to announce the second annual Eliza So Fellowship, in partnership with The Writer’s Block and Plympton. This month-long residency in Las Vegas will offer award recipients time and solitude to help them finish a book that is already in progress. The program’s inaugural fellow was Melissa Sipin in 2017.

The 2018 fellowships will include room and board at The Writer’s Block, along with a $500 food stipend and $400 toward travel.  They are pleased to expand the program this year to offer two residencies between September and December, and awarded in the following categories:

  • The Eliza So Fellowship for Immigrant Writers
  • The Eliza So Fellowship for Montana Indigenous Writers

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:

  •  You have a novel, collection of stories, memoir, or other prose work (fiction, nonfiction or hybrid) in progress (100 pages minimum) or poetry collection in progress (30 pages minimum)  
  • You are either: a) A US immigrant (documented or undocumented), b) An indigenous writer with significant ties to Montana (either you are from Montana, live in Montana currently, or have another significant affiliation with Montana).

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: March 25, 2018
  • Results Announced: June 1, 2018

blog.submittable.com/2017/12/the-2018-eliza-so-fellowship/

 

ARTIST FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM       

The Jerome Foundation

INFO: The Jerome Foundation is pleased to announce the first round of a new Artist Fellowship program that offers flexible, two-year grants to support the creative development of early-career generative artists in the state of Minnesota and the five boroughs of New York City. Artists may apply individually or together with other members of ongoing collectives or ensembles.

The Jerome Foundation makes a distinction between generative artists (those artists responsible for artistic control in generating entirely new work, including writers, choreographers, film directors, visual artists, composers, playwrights, etc.) and interpretive artists (those who interpret or execute the work created by others, including actors, editors, dramaturgs, singers, dancers, musicians, designers, etc.). The Foundation recognizes that some artists do both generative and interpretive work. Nevertheless, the Fellowship program supports only those artists with a significant history of generative work.

All eligible applicants must have a history of making and presenting new work to the public beyond student work (if the applicant has pursued formal training). While an applicant’s past projects are reviewed as part of the selection process, the program’s primary focus is supporting an artist’s future potential through the creation of new work or activities that support professional development and/or career advancement.

The Foundation will make 10 grants in each of six categories:

  • Dance
  • Literature (fiction, creative non-fiction and poetry)
  • ·Media—including Film, Video and Digital Production (documentary, narrative, animation, or experimental) and New Media (artistic work that is computational and distributed digitally, in the form of websites, mobile apps, virtual worlds, computer games, human-computer interface or interactive computer installations)
  • Music
  • Theater, Performance and Spoken Word
  • Visual arts

Artists whose work spans multiple disciplines may request to be reviewed in two different disciplines. The Foundation reserves the right, however, to direct such applications to a single panel.

AWARD: Each fellow will receive $20,000 per year for two consecutive years, making the total cash award $40,000 over the two-year period. Individual artists may petition the Foundation to reduce the award amount but must present specific, compelling reasons to do so. Artists applying as part of a collective or ensemble will share one $20,000 per year award.

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Application Period:  Now through May 8, 2018 at 4pm Central / 5pm Eastern Time
  • Notification of grant awards: By April 15, 2019
  • Earliest Date to Receive Funds: May 8, 2019

jeromefdn.org/apply/artist-fellowship

FICTION / NONFICTION -- JANUARY 2018

THE 2018 ELIZA SO FELLOWSHIP

Submittable

INFO: Submittable is thrilled to announce the second annual Eliza So Fellowship, in partnership with The Writer’s Block and Plympton. This month-long residency in Las Vegas will offer award recipients time and solitude to help them finish a book that is already in progress. The program’s inaugural fellow was Melissa Sipin in 2017.

The 2018 fellowships will include room and board at The Writer’s Block, along with a $500 food stipend and $400 toward travel.  They are pleased to expand the program this year to offer two residencies between September and December, and awarded in the following categories:

  • The Eliza So Fellowship for Immigrant Writers
  • The Eliza So Fellowship for Montana Indigenous Writers

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS:

  •  You have a novel, collection of stories, memoir, or other prose work (fiction, nonfiction or hybrid) in progress (100 pages minimum) or poetry collection in progress (30 pages minimum)  
  • You are either: a) A US immigrant (documented or undocumented), b) An indigenous writer with significant ties to Montana (either you are from Montana, live in Montana currently, or have another significant affiliation with Montana).

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Submissions Open: January 1, 2018
  • Deadline: March 25, 2018
  • Results Announced: June 1, 2018

blog.submittable.com/2017/12/the-2018-eliza-so-fellowship/

 

THE CHRISTOPHER DOHENY AWARD 2017

The Center for Fiction

INFO: The Center for Fiction and Audible, Inc. are pleased to announce that submissions are now being accepted for the fifth annual Christopher Doheny Award. The award recognizes excellence in fiction or creative nonfiction on the topic of serious physical illness. The winner of the award must demonstrate both high literary standards and a broad audience appeal while exploring the impact of illness on the patient, family and friends, and others. With generous support from Audible, Inc. and the Doheny family and friends, the award includes a $10,000 prize and production and promotion of the book in an audio edition, with the option to pursue print publication with the assistance of Audible, Inc.

ELIGIBILITY: Writers must have previously published in literary journals or magazines, or have published a book with an independent or traditional publisher. Self-publication does not meet this guideline.

Only unpublished manuscripts written in English are eligible. Manuscripts should be at least 30,000 words. Both adult and YA manuscripts are eligible for the prize. If submitting a story collection, all pieces must relate in some way to the topic of serious illness. Works in progress and proposals are not eligible for consideration, nor are books currently under contract with a publisher.

In the event of a dispute as to eligibility, The Center for Fiction and Audible will decide whether a book is eligible, and their decision will be binding.

SELECTION PROCESS: A panel of three distinguished writers and two representatives of Audible, Inc. will judge the submissions.

ADDITIONAL CONDITIONS OF THE AWARDS: The author of the winning submission must agree to participate in related publicity, including posting audio and/or video or selections from the winning manuscript on the websites of The Center for Fiction and/or Audible, Inc.

DEADLINE: January 2, 2017

centerforfiction.org/awards/the-christopher-doheny-award/christopher-doheny-award-submission-guidelines/?mc_cid=f9bc619ee8&mc_eid=591acda9d1

 

WINTER 2018 LETTERPRESS PRINTING & FINE PRESS PUBLISHING SEMINAR

The Center for Book Arts

INFO: The Center for Book Arts invites applications for our Letterpress Publishing Seminar for Emerging Writers. The next session of this workshop is scheduled for winter 2018, January 17-21 (Wednesday - Sunday). The seminar is tuition free for participants and includes the cost of materials. Those selected must attend the entire five-day workshop.

Participants will hear lectures from various professionals in the field – printers, fine press publishers, book artists, and dealers, to get a practical overview of letterpress printing and small press publishing. They will learn the basics of letterpress printing, both traditional typesetting and options with new technology, by collaboratively printing a small edition of broadsides. This workshop is most suitable for those with little to no previous letterpress experience. Each seminar will be offered to a maximum of eight students. Writers from culturally diverse backgrounds are especially encouraged to apply. 

Applications will not be accepted from students enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs during the program year (September 2017-May 2018.)

APPLICATION FEE: $20

DEADLINE: January 3, 2018

centerforbookarts.submittable.com/submit/101246/winter-2018-letterpress-printing-fine-press-publishing-seminar

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Rigorous

INFO: Rigorous is an online journal highlighting the works of authors, artists, critics, and educators of color. They publish fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, visual art, sound art, audiovisual art and movies, cartoons, and any other artistic creations by people of color. They accept all genres, and have a particular affinity for science fiction, superheroes, and other “geek” genres.

They seek essays on the personal experiences of people of color and interviews with interesting people of color. They seek critical analysis of art by people of color. They are especially interested in stories about and by educators of color, and the experience of teaching the works of people of color.

Rigorous is edited by Rosalyn Spencer and Kenyatta JP Garcia, with Associate Editor Carla Williams.

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: January 5, 2018
  • Issue Released: January 20, 2018

rigorous.submittable.com/submit

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Serendipity

INFO: Submissions for the annual print issue of Serendipity are open. They are particularly interested in work that grapples with the intersections of race, gender, disability, and sexuality in our current socio-political climate. LGBTQ women of color are strongly encouraged to submit. 

Please do not submit if you do not identify as a person of color.

Serendipity is a literary journal specializing in poetry, prose, and art that engages with issues of race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and intersecting identities. They seek work that explores, celebrates, and interrogates all aspects of our identities; and work that delights and beguiles our readerly sensibilities.  They are an online semi-annual, (Winter and Summer), and an annual print publication featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual art. Our goal is to publish exciting work that amplifies marginalized voices, particularly that of same-gender loving women of color.

They accept prose submissions under 5,000 words and no more than three (3) poems, in either .doc or .docx format. Please use 12pt font, 1-inch margins, and number your pages. Include your last name, genre, and title of the work in the header.

DEADLINE: January 15, 2018

serendipitylitmag.org/submit/

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: INDIGENOUS FUTURISMS & IMAGINING THE DECOLONIAL

Anamaly

INFO: Anomaly is seeking poetry, short fiction, essays, art, multimedia, and hybrid work by indigenous people and colonized people of color.

Work should relate or respond to indigenous futurisms, indigenous futures, and/or imagining the decolonial (future, present, or past). Speculative and non-speculative work are both welcome. Imagine the future, re-imagine the past or present. Let’s talk about what future we’re fighting for. What lives we’re living, now.

Aceptamos trabajo en español o bilingüe, con o sin traducciones. Ang isyung ito ay bukas din sa mga gawang isinulat sa Tagalog o pinagsamang Tagalog at Ingles. Maaring magsama ng salin sa Ingles ngunit hindi ito kinakailangan.

They accept work in Spanish, Tagalog, and other languages, as well as bilingual work, with or without translations.
 
Please send work, as well as a brief bio, to decolonizeordie@gmail.com.

DEADLINE: January 15, 2018

medium.com/anomalyblog/call-for-submissions-indigenous-futurisms-imagining-the-decolonial-7a556a70404f

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: SURVIVOR ISSUE

Radiant Health Magazine

INFO: Radiant Health magazine is dedicated to the discerning African woman and her journey to wellness through health, beauty + culture.

Radiant Issue No. 11 is the Survivor Issue. They are looking for article pitches of survival and what it means to be a survivor. Survival can mean living through a personal trauma (ie. disease, personal crime/attack, war, rape) or coping with the death of a family member/friend. They are open to creative individual interpretation of what it means to be a survivor as long as the angle is well-crafted, engaging and fits with the literary aesthetics of our publication. Interviews of individuals with a survival narrative are strongly encouraged and preferred--AND must correspond with section headings within the publication.  (If you have someone in mind who is an optimal fit for a feature article, please include in your pitch along with the relevant section category.) Please review most recent issue to see section categories, and examples of content and tone. 

PITCHES ONLY. Full articles will not be accepted at this time.

RIGHTS: Radiant Health Magazine retains first exclusive rights.

PAYMENT: Payment disclosed upon pitch acceptance.

DEADLINE: January 15, 2018

radianthealthmag.submittable.com/submit

 

KUNDIMAN ANNUAL RETREAT

INFO: In order to help mentor the next generation of Asian American writers, Kundiman sponsors an annual Retreat in partnership with Fordham University. During the Retreat, nationally renowned Asian American poets and writers conduct Master Classes and manuscript consultations with fellows. Readings, writing circles and informal social gatherings are also scheduled. Through this Retreat, Kundiman hopes to provide a safe and instructive environment that identifies and addresses the unique challenges faced by emerging Asian American writers. This five-day Retreat takes place from Wednesday to Sunday. Workshops will not exceed six students.

A nationally renowned Asian American writer facilitates each Master Class workshop. Fellows are assigned a home group for the duration of the retreat and the faculty rotates in the workshopping of each home group. The Kundiman Retreat is generative in nature and so Master Classes are focused on new work that is written at the Retreat. Master Classes include a craft talk, readings and prompts / exercises to generate this new work. Poetry fellows will receive a manuscript consultation on a 10 page manuscript. Fiction fellows will receive a manuscript consultation on a 15 page manuscript. Our hope is that fellows are able to forge a deeper relationship to their artistic process and are able to encounter their work with renewed focus and energy.  

LOCATION: The Kundiman Retreat is held at Fordham University's beautiful Rose Hill Campus located in the Bronx, NYC.

ELIGIBILITY: The Retreat is open to anyone who self-identifies as Asian American. 

FEES:

  • The non-refundable tuition fee is $375. Room and board provided free to accepted fellows.
  • The application fee is $25.

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Deadline: January 15, 2018
  • Retreat: June 20 - 24, 2018

kundiman.org/retreat/

 

2018 YEMASSEE JOURNAL FICTION CONTEST

INFO: Yemassee is accepting entries for its 2017 Writing Prizes, including the 2017 Fiction Contest. The author of the winning story will receive $750 and publication in Yemassee 24.2. The editors will select ten finalists and pass those stories on to the guest judge. The ten finalists will receive acknowledgment and all entries will be considered for publication in an upcoming issue of Yemassee.

ENTRY INSTRUCTIONS: To enter, submit one story up to 7500 words. An entry fee of $17 must accompany each entry.

DISCOUNTED SUBSCRIPTION: Entries accompanied by $20 qualify the submitter for a one-year subscription to Yemassee. Please select the appropriate fee category. 

DEADLINE: January 15, 2018

yemasseejournal.com/fiction-contest/

 

HELENE WURLITZER FOUNDATION RETREAT

INFO: The Helene Wurlitzer Foundation of New Mexico provides residency grants to people who specialize in the creative arts. The foundation accepts applications from and offers residency grants to painters, poets, sculptors, writers, playwrights, screenwriters, composers, photographers and filmmakers, of national and international origin.

The Foundation offers three months of rent-free and utility-paid housing to grantees. Our eleven guest houses, or casitas, are fully furnished and provide residents with a peaceful setting in which to pursue their creative endeavors.

The HWF also provides academic scholarships to graduating high school seniors pursuing degrees in the creative arts.

The Foundation offers three sessions a year: 
• Session 1 (mid January - mid April) 
• Session 2 (June - mid August) 
• Session 3 (early September - early December)

What is included in the residency?

The HWF grants rent-free and utility-paid housing on the foundation campus, providing artists with their own fully furnished home and a peaceful setting in which to pursue their creative endeavors. The HWF places no expectations or requirements on the artists in residence; It is the gift of time and space. In addition to the casitas, the HWF campus includes the Commons House w/ wi-fi, Library, The Main House, and laundry facilities. Residents are responsible for their own food and transportation, although the Foundation does provide bicycles for artists in residence. 

What artistic disciplines are eligible for a residency grant?

  • Visual artists: painters, illustrators, photographers, sculptors, filmmakers, ceramicists 
  • Literary artists: writers, poets, playwrights & screenwriters 
  • Music composers and songwriters

Literary artists must submit hard-copy work samples. Include a cover sheet containing your contact info and table of contents, but please omit names and contact info on the writing samples themselves

  • Writers: samples should not exceed 35 double-spaced pages 
  • Poets: a maximum of six poems. 
  • Playwrights: include one complete play. 
  • Screenwriters: include one complete screenplay. 

APPLICATION FEE: $25

DEADLINE: January 18, 2018

wurlitzerfoundation.org/apply

 

NYSCA / NYFA ARTIST FELLOWSHIP

New York Foundation for the Arts

INFO: NYSCA/NYFA Artist Fellowships, awarded in fifteen different disciplines over a three-year period, are $7,000 cash awards made to individual originating artists living and working in the state of New York for unrestricted use. These fellowships are not project grants but are intended to fund an artist’s vision or voice, regardless of the level of his or her artistic development.

ARTIST FELLOWSHIP CATEGORIES:

  • Fiction
  • Folk/Traditional Arts
  • Interdisciplinary Work
  • Painting
  • Video/Film

(Includes the Joanne Chen Fellowship awarded annually to a Taiwanese American artist resident in New York. The winner of this award will receive an unrestricted grant of $7,000.) 

DEADLINE: January 24, 2018 at 11:59 PM EST

nyfa.org/Content/Show/Artists'%20Fellowships

 

WORKSPACE 2018-2019

Lower Manhattan Cultural Council

INFO: Workspace is a nine-month studio residency program that focuses on creative practice development for emerging artists working across all disciplines, LMCC’s Workspace program offers space for experimentation and dialogue with peers and arts professionals, as well as career-advancement opportunities. Workspace encourages creative risk-taking, collaboration, learning and skill-sharing at a critical early stage of an artist’s career and serves between 15 and 20 individuals or collaborative groups annually. Emerging visual artists, performing artists, and writers working in all media and genres are eligible to apply.

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Application Deadline: Thursday, January 25, 2018 at 5:00pm
  • Residency: September 2018 – May 2019

lmcc.net/program/workspace/?mc_cid=6b45a54c82&mc_eid=2bec2fd1bc

 

THE SARAH LAWRENCE COLLEGE INTERNATIONAL AUDIO FICTION AWARDS

INFO: The Sarah Lawrence College International Audio Fiction Awards is now accepting submissions! 

PRIZE: Winners will receive $4000 in cash prizes ($2000 for first place, $1000 for second place, $500 for third place, $250 for Best New Artist and $250 for Sarahs' Sarah Award) and be celebrated at an award ceremony on April 23, 2018 at New York City's Players' Club

TO BE ELIGIBLE: 

  • Entries must have been produced between February 2017 and February 2018.
  • Entries must be between 3 minutes and 60 minutes in length. 
  • Each entry will be judged individually.
  • Serialized works are allowed to enter, but the entry for each series can be no more than 60 minutes. Those choosing to enter series can use that time however they want. You can upload an episode that you believe is representative of the series, provide excerpts from multiple episodes, etc. The entry can not be more than 60 minutes. Each entry will be judged individually.
  • Entries of all languages are admissible. However, if your works are not in English, you must provide a transcript in English. 
  • They cannot offer individual critiques of declined audio or reasons for declining audio from the nominations. 
  • All works must be fiction–no documentaries will be accepted. (However, mockumentaries will be happily accepted.)
  • Questions? Email us at info@thesarahawards.com.
  • You may submit as many entries as you like.

TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS:

  • Each entry should consist of one audio file. (MP3)
  • Entries are only accepted through Submittable. There you will find clear instructions for uploading your story. If you need help or have any questions, please email us: info@thesarahawards.com

FEES & DEADLINE: 

  • Free for student entries.
  • $40 for all entries uploaded by Wednesday, January 31, 2018 at 5 p.m. EST
  • Entries uploaded after Friday, January 31, 2018 by 5 p.m. EST will not be judged.
  • All entries may be considered for the The Sarahs’ Serendipity podcast. 

thesarahawards.com/rules/

 

ANAPHORA WRITING RESIDENCY

Otis College of Art and Design 

INFO: Anaphora Writing Residency is a ten-day program, designed exclusively for writers of color. The residency will provide genre-specific workshops in fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction. Workshops are held with small groups that meet five or six times throughout the residency. Faculty will also be available for consultation sessions. The residency will feature lectures by faculty, visiting writers, and other guests; roundtable discussions on topics about the literary and publishing industry; a keynote address; pitch madness sessions; and different networking opportunities with fellow writers and professionals from the publishing industry. Participants will also have the opportunity give and attend readings, as well as participate in field trips to local museums and art galleries in Los Angeles. Participants who are also visual artists may have the opportunity to sign up for a master class with the critic-in-residence.  

The fee to attend the residency is $3,000, which includes room and board. Notifications will be sent out via email in early March. A $350 deposit fee is required to secure your spot in the residency after notifications go out and the full balance is due in early May. 

A limited number of fellowships are available based on merit and financial need; six partial fellowships ($1,500 each), and two full fellowships ($3,000 each) will be available. Additionally, Anaphora Literary Arts will support two partial fellowships ($1,500 each). Fellowships do not provide a travel stipend. If you would like to be considered for a fellowship, please submit your application by the priority deadline, January 15, 2018.

APPLICATION FEE: $20

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Deadline: January 31, 2018
  • Residency: May 31 – June 9, 2018

Participants must apply by the priority deadline of January 15, 2018 to be considered for fellowships. 

otis.edu/anaphora-writing-residency

 

CAINE PRIZE FOR AFRICAN WRITING

INFO: The Caine Prize for African Writing is a literature prize awarded to an African writer of a short story published in English. The prize was launched in 2000 to encourage and highlight the richness and diversity of African writing by bringing it to a wider audience internationally. The focus on the short story reflects the contemporary development of the African story-telling tradition.

DEADLINE: January 31, 2018

http://caineprize.com/how-to-enter/

 

GRAYWOLF PRESS NONFICTION PRIZE

INFO: The Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize is awarded to a manuscript in progress, submissions for the prize are held every other year to allow for the longer lead time needed to develop and publish the winning manuscripts. The next prize will be held in January 2018.

A $12,000 advance and publication by Graywolf will be awarded to the most promising and innovative literary nonfiction project by a writer not yet established in the genre. The prize will be awarded to a manuscript in progress. They request that authors send a long sample from their manuscript, as well as a description of the work, as detailed below. They expect that they will work with the winner of the prize and provide editorial guidance toward the completion of the project. The Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize emphasizes innovation in form, and they want to see projects that test the boundaries of literary nonfiction. They are less interested in straightforward memoirs, and they turn down a large number of them every year. Before submitting your manuscript for the prize, please look at the books previously published as winners of the prize for examples of the type of work that we are seeking. 

The Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize seeks to acknowledge—and honor—the great traditions of literary nonfiction. Whether grounded in observation, autobiography, or research, much of the most beautiful, daring, and original writing over the past few decades can be categorized as nonfiction. Submissions to the prize might span memoir, biography, or history.

Eligibility: Any writer who is not yet established in the genre and resides in the United States is eligible. Writers do not need to have prior publication to be eligible. We will consider one submission per person.  Agented submissions are also welcome. Manuscripts submitted for previous years’ prizes will not be reconsidered unless resubmission has been specifically requested by Graywolf’s editors or the judge. Graywolf’s editors and the prize judge reserve the right to invite submissions or make exceptions.

DEADLINE: January 31, 2018

graywolfpress.org/graywolf-press-nonfiction-prize

 

HURSTON / WRIGHT COLLEGE WRITERS AWARD

The Zora Neale Hurston / Richard Wright Foundation

INFO: The Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Foundation is proud to host the annual Hurston/Wright Awards for College Writers, which is the only award of its kind that recognizes Black college writers. The award is the foundation’s first program. It was initiated to support emerging Black artists in fiction and poetry enrolled full-time in an undergraduate or graduate school program anywhere in the United States.   

Submissions will be judged by distinguished published authors in fiction and poetry. Writers will be notified in March whether their submissions were accepted or not accepted. Awards, which include a cash prize, will be announced in May. Award winners will be invited to attend the Legacy Award ceremony that is hosted in October in Washington, DC.

ENTRY FEE: $25

DEADLINE: January 31, 2018

https://hurstonwrightfoundation.submittable.com/submit

 

2018 SHORT STORY CONTEST

Little Tokyo Historical Society

INFO: The Little Tokyo Historical Society (LTHS) seeks fictional short stories for its fifth annual Imagine Little Tokyo short story contest in the categories of English language, Japanese language and youth (18 and younger).

The purpose of the contest is to raise awareness of Little Tokyo through a creative story that takes place in Little Tokyo. The story has to be fictional and set in a current, past or future Little Tokyo in the City of Los Angeles, California.

AWARD: Each category winner will be awarded $500 in cash with their short story being published in The Rafu Shimpo and Discover Nikkei website. A public award ceremony and dramatic readings of the winning stories are also being planned for spring 2018.

DEADLINE: January 31, 2018

littletokyohs.org/short-story-contest.html

 

ANISFIELD-WOLF FELLOWSHIP IN WRITING & PUBLISHING

Cleveland State University Poetry Center

INFO: The Cleveland State University Poetry Center is accepting applications for the Anisfield-Wolf Fellowship in Writing & Publishing, a two-year post-graduate fellowship that offers an emerging writer time to work toward a first or second book and an opportunity to gain experience in editing, publishing, literary programming, and outreach in collaboration with the staff of the CSU Poetry Center.

The CSU Poetry Center is a 55+-year-old independent nonprofit press that publishes 3–5 books of contemporary poetry, prose, and translation each year. The Poetry Center also hosts the Lighthouse Reading Series and serves as a teaching lab for undergraduate and graduate students at Cleveland State University and within the Northeast Ohio MFA program. The Fellow will be a two-year employee of the CSU English department. The salary is $40,000 per year with health insurance and benefits.

The fellowship will encompass two academic-year (9-month) residencies of 30 hours per week, divided between writing, work at the CSU Poetry Center, and an outreach project of the Fellow’s own design. Poetry Center work will include reviewing submissions, attending editorial meetings, and assisting with Center contests. Possible outreach projects include (but are not limited to): developing an anthology incorporating authors from an underrepresented community; organizing community writing workshops; developing a reading series to engage previously underserved communities; or working with a local organization involved in education, social justice, and the literary arts. The project should be designed and completed in the two years in which the Fellow is in residence. It is expected that this work will further engage an already enthusiastic writing community at Cleveland State University and throughout Cleveland. Additional professional development opportunities for the Fellow will include participation in Cleveland Book Week and public readings of their work for the Cleveland literary community.

This fellowship is named for and supported by the Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards, which honor literature that promotes equity and social justice and are administered through the Cleveland Foundation. Through the creation of this fellowship, Anisfield-Wolf and the CSU Poetry Center hope to support writers from backgrounds and with perspectives historically underrepresented in publishing and creative writing programming. By providing editorial experience and opportunities at a literary press, the fellowship also aims to help address the longstanding lack of diversity in the U.S. publishing workforce.

Cleveland poet and philanthropist Edith Anisfield Wolf established the book awards in 1935 in honor of her father, John Anisfield, and husband, Eugene Wolf, to reflect her family’s passion for social justice and the rich diversity of human cultures. Founded with a focus on combating racism in America, the Anisfield-Wolf Awards today maintain that commitment to equity and justice in an expanded, global context. Recent winners, for example, have also addressed religious identity, immigrant experiences, LGBTQ+ history, and the lives of people with disabilities.

DEADLINE: February 1, 2017

csupoetrycenter.com/news-1/2017/12/13/anisfield-wolf-fellowship-in-writing-publishing

 

U.S.-JAPAN CREATIVE ARTISTS EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIPS

Japan-United States Friendship Commission

INFO: The Japan U.S. Friendship Commission offers leading contemporary and traditional artists from the United States the opportunity to spend three to five months in Japan through the U.S.-Japan Creative Artists Program.  Artists go as seekers, as cultural visionaries, and as living liaisons to the traditional and contemporary cultural life of Japan.  They also go as connectors who share knowledge and bring back knowledge. Their interaction with the Japanese public and the outlook they bring home provide exceptional opportunities to promote cultural understanding between the United States and Japan.

Since 1978, the Japan-US Friendship Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) have worked  with the Agency for Cultural Affairs in Japan and the International House of Japan (I-House) to organize the United States-Japan Creative Artists’ Program. Each year five leading U.S.-based artists, representing all genres, are selected from the United States and are provided funding to spend three months in Japan.

This residency program allows the artists to research and experience both the traditional and contemporary artistic milieu of Japan. Artists are free to live anywhere in the country to pursue activities of greatest relevance to their creative process. While many artists chose to remain in Tokyo, others live in Kyoto or other cities, and still others work in rural settings or travel around the countryside. The International House of Japan provides in-depth orientation materials, expert advice and professional contacts, as well as logistical support during the residency period.

Primary Eligibility:

  • Candidates must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States.
  • Candidates must live and work professionally primarily in the United States.
  • Candidates must be professional creative artists (contemporary or traditional) working as: architects, choreographers, composers, creative writers, designers, media artists, playwrights, librettists, visual artists and solo theater artists who work with original material (including puppeteers, and performance artists). For additional eligibility requirements, please click here.

AWARD: A grant award of $20,000 for three months, and $28,000 for up to five months will be provided to each artist to cover housing, living and professional expenses.  Artists will be responsible for converting their U.S. Dollar award into Japanese Yen.  The Commission will also provide grantees up to $2,000 to cover the cost of their round-trip transportation to Japan.

DEADLINE: February 1, 2018 at 11:59 EST

jusfc.gov/creative-artists-programs/

 

ARTIST FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM       

The Jerome Foundation

INFO: The Jerome Foundation is pleased to announce the first round of a new Artist Fellowship program that offers flexible, two-year grants to support the creative development of early-career generative artists in the state of Minnesota and the five boroughs of New York City. Artists may apply individually or together with other members of ongoing collectives or ensembles.

The Jerome Foundation makes a distinction between generative artists (those artists responsible for artistic control in generating entirely new work, including writers, choreographers, film directors, visual artists, composers, playwrights, etc.) and interpretive artists (those who interpret or execute the work created by others, including actors, editors, dramaturgs, singers, dancers, musicians, designers, etc.). The Foundation recognizes that some artists do both generative and interpretive work. Nevertheless, the Fellowship program supports only those artists with a significant history of generative work.

All eligible applicants must have a history of making and presenting new work to the public beyond student work (if the applicant has pursued formal training). While an applicant’s past projects are reviewed as part of the selection process, the program’s primary focus is supporting an artist’s future potential through the creation of new work or activities that support professional development and/or career advancement.

The Foundation will make 10 grants in each of six categories:

  • Dance
  • Literature (fiction, creative non-fiction and poetry)
  • ·Media—including Film, Video and Digital Production (documentary, narrative, animation, or experimental) and New Media (artistic work that is computational and distributed digitally, in the form of websites, mobile apps, virtual worlds, computer games, human-computer interface or interactive computer installations)
  • Music
  • Theater, Performance and Spoken Word
  • Visual arts

Artists whose work spans multiple disciplines may request to be reviewed in two different disciplines. The Foundation reserves the right, however, to direct such applications to a single panel.

AWARD: Each fellow will receive $20,000 per year for two consecutive years, making the total cash award $40,000 over the two-year period. Individual artists may petition the Foundation to reduce the award amount but must present specific, compelling reasons to do so. Artists applying as part of a collective or ensemble will share one $20,000 per year award.

IMPORTANT DATES:

  • Application Period:  Now through May 8, 2018 at 4pm Central / 5pm Eastern Time
  • Notification of grant awards: By April 15, 2019
  • Earliest Date to Receive Funds: May 8, 2019

jeromefdn.org/apply/artist-fellowship

 

iSTORY

Narrative

INFO: An iStory is a short, dramatic narrative, fiction or nonfiction, up to 150 words long. They are particularly interested in works that give readers a strong sense of having read a full and complete story in a brief space.

AWARD: $100 for each iStory accepted for publication.

SUBMISSION FEE: There is a $22 fee for each submission. And with your submission, you’ll receive three months of complimentary access to Narrative Backstage.

narrativemagazine.com/iStory

 

FICTION / NONFICTION - DECEMBER 2017

2018 BRONX RECOGNIZES ITS OWN (BRIO) AWARD FOR LITERARY ARTS

Bronx Council on the Arts

INFO: Bronx Recognizes Its Own (BRIO) provides direct support to individual Bronx artists who create literary, media, visual, and performing works of art. 

BRIO awardees must complete a one-time public service activity to receive their complete cash award. Known as ACE (Artists for Community Enrichment), this activity is an essential component for all BRIO recipients and must be performed within the one-year period of their award.  ACE provides artists with additional visibility and demonstrates to the community the wealth of artistic talent available in our borough.

AWARD: Grants of $4,000 will be awarded to Bronx artists. BRIO award winners complete a one-time public service activity. The awards are based solely on artistic excellence. Winners are selected by a panel of arts professionals representing the award disciplines.

 SELECTION OF AWARDS

The selection of awards is based solely on artistic excellence – the quality of work submitted – and decided by a panel of arts professionals. A new panel is convened each year. All materials and information involved in the selection process are kept confidential and are viewed anonymously by the panelists. When the application is received, a code number is assigned to each application and its corresponding material. The applicant's coded submission is the only information available to the panelists for review. Materials not meeting the submission guidelines will render an application ineligible.

AWARD NOTIFICATION
Decisions will be e-mailed to all applicants approximately four months after the deadline date. Winners will be invited to a ceremony in June of 2018 at which they will be honored and receive the Award.They are then required to complete a one-time community service activity known as Artist for Community Enrichment (ACE) within a year. All BRIO awards are subject to verification of information submitted and proof of Bronx residency.

DEADLINE: December 8, 2017 

bronxcouncilonthearts.submittable.com/submit/92850/2018-bronx-recognizes-its-own-brio-award-for-literary-arts

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSION – “HOMELAND”

On She Goes

INFO: On She Goes is a platform for, by, and about women of color & travel. Each quarter features a fresh, new theme around the world of travel. In Fall 2017 they're excited to explore the idea of Homeland. 

There's the cliche: Home is where the heart is. Home can be more than four walls and a roof, a zip code, or the wide expanse that lives within a border. Some of us are often asked, "Where are you from? No really where are you from?" or made to feel like we don't belong in cities and countries that we've called our home. As women of color, we've had to create our own spaces and belonging, and we want to know more about what it means to travel to one's homeland.

How were you shaped by the visit back to the country where you or your parents were born? How does your travel influence how you think about what one's homeland is? Is your homeland not a physical landscape, but something more abstract? Do you have a fun and funny story about "going back" that you'd think would resonate with our readers? Is your homeland less of a physical place, is it a favorite food, song, or person? Travel and homeland can feel complicated and comforting, and we want to hear about it!
* Payment varies, depending on the assigned piece.  

DEADLINE: December 15, 2017

onshegoes.submittable.com/submit/93188/on-she-goes-homeland-theme

 

THE HURSTON / WRIGHT LEGACY AWARD

Hurston / Wright Foundation

INFO: The Hurston/Wright Legacy Awards are open to Black writers in America and across the globe. Full-length books of debut fiction, fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as collections of short stories, and collections of essays by one author. (All works must be newly published. E-books are not eligible.)

APPLICATON FEE: $40

DEADLINE: December 15, 2017

hurstonwright.org/book-submissions/

 

BCALA LITERARY AWARDS

Black Caucus of the American Library Association, Inc. 

INFO: The Literary Awards Committee of the Black Caucus of the American Library Association, Inc. (BCALA) is now accepting submissions for the annual BCALA Literary Awards. The Committee will present four prizes of $500.00 each for adult books written by African American authors: a First Novelist Award, a Fiction Award, a Nonfiction Award, and a Poetry Award. The First Novelist Award is given to recognize an outstanding work by a first time African American fiction writer. Honor Book citations are also awarded in fiction and nonfiction without any accompanying monetary remuneration. Additionally, an Outstanding Contribution to Publishing citation is provided to an author and/or publishing company for unique books that offer a positive depiction of African Americans.

First presented at the Second National Conference of African American Librarians in 1994, the BCALA Literary Awards acknowledge outstanding works of fiction and nonfiction for adult audiences by African American authors. Recipients of these awards offer outstanding depictions of the cultural, historical or sociopolitical aspects of the Black Diaspora and embody the highest quality of writing style and research methodology, if applicable.

Books from small, large and specialty publishers are welcome for review consideration. Titles forwarded for review must be published in 2017. Sets or multi-volume works are eligible. New editions of previously published works are eligible only if more than 30% of the total content is new or revised material. Inspirational, self-help, and adult graphic novels are ineligible. Only finished, published books should be submitted; galleys (bound or unbound) and chapbooks are unacceptable.

Please send one copy of each title submitted to each member of the Literary Awards Committee. A Committee roster with their addresses can be found at here.

Supply all available information regarding the submission, including promotional material, author biography and available news articles and reviews.

BCALA Literary Awards Criteria
BCALA presents four (4) $500.00 awards: one for adult fiction, one for nonfiction, one for a first novelist and one for poetry. These awards acknowledge outstanding achievement in the presentation of the cultural, historical and sociopolitical aspects of the Black Diaspora.

  • The Fiction Award recognizes depictions of sensitive and authentic personal experience either within the framework of contemporary literary standards and themes or which explore innovative literary formats.
  • The Nonfiction Award honors cultural, historical, political, or social criticism or academic and/or professional research which significantly advances the body of knowledge currently associated with the people and the legacy of the Black Diaspora. (Categories could include the humanities, science and technology, social and behavioral sciences and reference).
  • The First Novelist Award acknowledges outstanding achievement in writing and storytelling by a first time fiction writer.
  • The Outstanding Contribution to Publishing Citation recognizes the author and/or the publishing company (for their support and publication of) special and unique books that recognize the outstanding achievements and positive depiction of contributions of the people and legacy of the Black Diaspora.
  • The Poetry Award strives to recognize and promote emerging and established poets that introduce and foster the joys of poetry writing.

Additionally, honor books may be selected in each category.
Purpose: To encourage the artistic expression of the African American experience via literature and scholarly research including biographical, historical and social history treatments by African Americans.

Criteria:

  • Must portray some aspect of the African American experience past, present or future.
  • All authors, editors and contributors must be African American(s) born in the United States.
  • Must be published in the United States in the year preceding presentation of the award.
  • Must be an original work.

DEADLINE: December 29, 2017

bcala.org/book-award/

 

THE CHRISTOPHER DOHENY AWARD 2017

The Center for Fiction

INFO: The Center for Fiction and Audible, Inc. are pleased to announce that submissions are now being accepted for the fifth annual Christopher Doheny Award. The award recognizes excellence in fiction or creative nonfiction on the topic of serious physical illness. The winner of the award must demonstrate both high literary standards and a broad audience appeal while exploring the impact of illness on the patient, family and friends, and others. With generous support from Audible, Inc. and the Doheny family and friends, the award includes a $10,000 prize and production and promotion of the book in an audio edition, with the option to pursue print publication with the assistance of Audible, Inc.

ELIGIBILITY: Writers must have previously published in literary journals or magazines, or have published a book with an independent or traditional publisher. Self-publication does not meet this guideline.

Only unpublished manuscripts written in English are eligible. Manuscripts should be at least 30,000 words. Both adult and YA manuscripts are eligible for the prize. If submitting a story collection, all pieces must relate in some way to the topic of serious illness. Works in progress and proposals are not eligible for consideration, nor are books currently under contract with a publisher.

In the event of a dispute as to eligibility, The Center for Fiction and Audible will decide whether a book is eligible, and their decision will be binding.

SELECTION PROCESS: A panel of three distinguished writers and two representatives of Audible, Inc. will judge the submissions.

ADDITIONAL CONDITIONS OF THE AWARDS: The author of the winning submission must agree to participate in related publicity, including posting audio and/or video or selections from the winning manuscript on the websites of The Center for Fiction and/or Audible, Inc.

DEADLINE: January 2, 2017

centerforfiction.org/awards/the-christopher-doheny-award/christopher-doheny-award-submission-guidelines/?mc_cid=f9bc619ee8&mc_eid=591acda9d1

 

Winter 2018 Letterpress Printing & Fine Press Publishing Seminar

The Center for Book Arts

INFO: The Center for Book Arts invites applications for our Letterpress Publishing Seminar for Emerging Writers. The next session of this workshop is scheduled for winter 2018, January 17-21 (Wednesday - Sunday). The seminar is tuition free for participants and includes the cost of materials. Those selected must attend the entire five-day workshop.

Participants will hear lectures from various professionals in the field – printers, fine press publishers, book artists, and dealers, to get a practical overview of letterpress printing and small press publishing. They will learn the basics of letterpress printing, both traditional typesetting and options with new technology, by collaboratively printing a small edition of broadsides. This workshop is most suitable for those with little to no previous letterpress experience. Each seminar will be offered to a maximum of eight students. Writers from culturally diverse backgrounds are especially encouraged to apply. 

Applications will not be accepted from students enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs during the program year (September 2017-May 2018.)

APPLICATION FEE: $20

DEADLINE: January 3, 2018

centerforbookarts.submittable.com/submit/101246/winter-2018-letterpress-printing-fine-press-publishing-seminar

 

THE SARAH LAWRENCE COLLEGE INTERNATIONAL AUDIO FICTION AWARDS

INFO: The Sarah Lawrence College International Audio Fiction Awards is now accepting submissions! 

PRIZE: Winners will receive $4000 in cash prizes ($2000 for first place, $1000 for second place, $500 for third place, $250 for Best New Artist and $250 for Sarahs' Sarah Award) and be celebrated at an award ceremony on April 23, 2018 at New York City's Players' Club

TO BE ELIGIBLE: 

  • Entries must have been produced between February 2017 and February 2018.
  • Entries must be between 3 minutes and 60 minutes in length. 
  • Each entry will be judged individually.
  • Serialized works are allowed to enter, but the entry for each series can be no more than 60 minutes. Those choosing to enter series can use that time however they want. You can upload an episode that you believe is representative of the series, provide excerpts from multiple episodes, etc. The entry can not be more than 60 minutes. Each entry will be judged individually.
  • Entries of all languages are admissible. However, if your works are not in English, you must provide a transcript in English. 
  • They cannot offer individual critiques of declined audio or reasons for declining audio from the nominations. 
  • All works must be fiction–no documentaries will be accepted. (However, mockumentaries will be happily accepted.)
  • Questions? Email us at info@thesarahawards.com.
  • You may submit as many entries as you like.

TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS:

  • Each entry should consist of one audio file. (MP3)
  • Entries are only accepted through Submittable. There you will find clear instructions for uploading your story. If you need help or have any questions, please email us: info@thesarahawards.com

FEES & DEADLINE: 

  • Free for student entries.
  • $40 for all entries uploaded between Saturday, December 2, 2017 through Wednesday, January 31, 2018 at 5 p.m. EST
  • Entries uploaded after Friday, January 31, 2018 by 5 p.m. EST will not be judged.
  • All entries may be considered for the The Sarahs’ Serendipity podcast. 

thesarahawards.com/rules/

FICTION / NONFICTION - NOVEMBER 2017

2017 QUEER SOUTHEAST ASIA BOOK AWARD

INFO: The award is open to all emerging Southeast Asian writers. It comes with SGD 1,000 (tax-free) and book publication. The winning manuscript will be critically introduced by one of the editors of Queer Southeast Asia: a literary journal of transgressive art.

WHAT TO SUBMIT:

1. Full-length manuscript without the author’s identifying information and acknowledgments. Submitted manuscripts should not be under consideration in another competition or for publication by another press. PDF copy only.

  • For poetry submissions -- Submissions must be in Times New Roman (font size 12) and single-spaced with 1 inch margin on all sides. Page number must appear consecutively at the center of the bottom margin of each page.
  • For prose submissions -- Submissions must be in Times New Roman (font size 12) and double-spaced with 1 inch margin on all sides. Page number must appear consecutively at the center of the bottom margin of each page.
  • Note: prose genres except novel.

2. The author must provide an essay (2-4 pages; single-spaced) answering the questions below. The essay must appear in the manuscript after the title page and before the contents.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The essay will not be judged. Submitting writers should take this requirement as a way to introduce the context/s within which they write and the things they do in order to create or be creative. In addition, the questions below are supposed to be just guide questions. If submitting writers feel they should avoid these questions and respond to others not stated here, they may freely do so.

  • Question 1 -- As an artist, what of (queer) Southeast Asia are you concerned the most?
  • Question 2 -- How is your submitted manuscript relevant to (queer) Southeast Asia?
  • Question 3 -- What politics, frameworks, or conditions shaped your manuscript and the writing of your manuscript?
  • Question 4 -- What kind of impact do you wish your manuscript to incite?

3. The author’s curriculum vitae. No prescribed length. PDF copy only.

Note: The author's CV will not be judged. The author should submit only one manuscript.

DEADLINE: November 1, 2017.

queersoutheastasia.com/book-prize

 

TWF Very Short Fiction Contest

Tennessee Williams Festival

INFO: This contest is open only to writers who have not yet published a book of fiction. Only previously unpublished stories will be accepted.

ENTRY FEE: $10

AWARD:

  • $500
  • Passes to Panels and Master Classes ($200 Value)
  • Public reading at a literary panel at the next Festival
  • Publication in New Orleans Review Web Features
  • The top nine finalists will have their names published on this site.

DEADLINE: November 8, 2017

tennesseewilliamsfestival.submittable.com/submit/42271/twf-poetry-contest

 

Guernica Fellowship Program

INFO: Guernica is looking for applicants to join its spring/summer fellowship class. The program, which runs from the beginning of January through June, aims to provide deep training in magazine editing and production, coupled with opportunities to work on a dedicated writing or multimedia project with an editor-mentor. They estimate the weekly time commitment to be from ten to fifteen hours. Up to five emerging writers, editors, and multimedia journalists will be selected for a six-month fellowship, which will include:

  • Opportunities to work across the editorial planning and production cycle of the magazine
  • Fact-checking and copy editing
  • Reading submissions
  • Contributing ideas for forthcoming issues
  • Assisting with publicity and social media
  • Developing at least one piece for publication
  • Mentorship from senior staff and training from industry professionals

Their focus when reviewing applications will be on finding emerging writers, journalists, and editors with clear passion for digital publishing and literary reportage, and evident intellectual curiosity.

DEADLINE: November 10, 2017

guernicamagazine.submittable.com/submit/64351/guernica-fellowship-program

 

INDIGENOUS WRITING CONTEST

Second Story Press

INFO: Second Story Press is holding its second contest for contemporary writing for young readers that reflects the modern experiences and perspectives of Indigenous (First Nations, Métis, Inuit) peoples. Writers are invited to submit their original, previously unpublished manuscripts.

PRIZE: The winners of the contest will be offered a publishing contract from Second Story Press.

To be eligible, entrants must identify as an Indigenous (First Nations, Métis, and/or Inuit) person; be 18 years of age or older; be a citizen or permanent resident of Canada; and be the sole creator and owner of the rights to the submitted work(s).

Submissions must:

  • Be written for an audience of young readers (between ages 4 to 18).
  • Be manuscripts of either fiction (chapter books and novels), non-fiction, or picture books. We will not accept poetry, plays, short stories or short story collections.
  • Be primarily written in English, or provide an English translation.
  • Be previously unpublished and not currently under consideration by another publisher.

DEADLINE: November 15, 2017

secondstorypress.ca/indigenous-contest

 

30 BELOW CONTEST

Narrative Magazine

INFO: Narrative invites all writers and poets between eighteen and thirty years old to send their best work. Works of prose and of poetry, including short stories, all poetic forms, novel excerpts, essays, memoirs, and excerpts from book-length nonfiction. Prose submissions must not exceed 15,000 words. Each poetry submission may contain up to five poems. The poems should all be contained in a single file. 

AWARDS:

  • First Prize: $1,500
  • Second Prize: $750
  • Third Prize: $300
  • Up to ten finalists will receive $100 each

SUBMISSION FEE: $24 fee for each entry (includes three months of complimentary access to Narrative Backstage).

DEADLINE: November 19, 2017

http://www.narrativemagazine.com/node/382367

 

FALL 2017 STORY CONTEST

Narrative Magazine

INFO: The Fall Contest is open to all fiction and nonfiction writers. Narrative is looking for short shorts, short stories, essays, memoirs, photo essays, graphic stories, all forms of literary nonfiction, and excerpts from longer works of both fiction and nonfiction.  

Entries must be previously unpublished, no longer than 15,000 words, and must not have been previously chosen as a winner, finalist, or honorable mention in another contest.

AWARDS:

  • First Prize: $2,500
  • Second Prize: $1,000
  • Third Prize: $500
  • Up to ten finalists will receive $100 each

SUBMISSION FEE: $24 fee for each entry (includes three months of complimentary access to Narrative Backstage).

DEADLINE: November 30, 2017

narrativemagazine.com/fall-2017-story-contest

 

TWF Fiction Contest

Tennessee Williams Festival

INFO: This contest is open only to writers who have not yet published a book of fiction. Only previously unpublished stories will be accepted.

ENTRY FEE: $25

AWARD:

  • $1,500
  • Domestic airfare (up to $500) and French Quarter accommodations to attend the Festival in New Orleans
  • VIP All-Access Festival pass for the next Festival ($600 value)
  • Public reading at a literary panel at the next Festival
  • Publication in Louisiana Literature
  • The top nine finalists will receive a panel pass ($75 value) to the Festival. Their names will be published on this site.

DEADLINE: November 30, 2017

tennesseewilliamsfestival.submittable.com/submit/42265/twf-fiction-contest

 

THE 2018 GOLDEN BOABAB PRIZE CALL FOR SUBMISSION

INFO: Golden Baobab is pleased to announce the call for submissions for the 2018 Golden Baobab Prize. The Prize discovers and celebrates African writers and illustrators of children's stories and confers awards for their work. After enjoying nine successful years as an industry leader, Golden Baobab this year announces an exciting new phase with a heavier focus on publishing. It also announces the re-opening of the Golden Baobab Prize for Illustrators, the most important award for African children's book illustrators.

The 2018 Golden Baobab Prize offers a distinct platform for professional African writers and illustrators to kick-start their careers. The Prize will work to facilitate relationships between African publishers and finalist writers and illustrators with the goal to see more African children's books being published. In view of this, Golden Baobab is excited to expand its publishing network and increase its impact in more countries.

  • The Golden Baobab Prize for Picture Books, for the best story targeting a reader audience of ages 4-8.
  • The Golden Baobab Prize for Early Chapter Books for the best story targeting a reader audience of ages 9-11.
  • The Golden Baobab Prize for Illustrators for the best artwork that matches illustration briefs provided, intended for children ages 4-11.

AWARD: Winners of the 2018 Golden Baobab Prize will receive a cash prize of 5,000 USD. In addition to press publicity, winning stories are guaranteed a publishing deal, finalist writers are connected with publishers across Africa and finalist illustrators participate in exhibitions and workshops.

DEADLINE: December 1, 2017

goldenbaobab.org/baobab-news/entry/the-2018-golden-baobab-prize-call-for-submissions

 

2018-19 WRITING FELLOWSHIP

Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown

INFO: The Fine Arts Work Center awards seven-month Writing Fellowships to five poets and five fiction writers each year from October 1 through April 30.  

Applications will either be sent to our Fiction Jury or our Poetry Jury.  Those whose works fall between those two categories or employ both may also apply; however, all applicants must either choose "Fiction" or "Poetry" on the application form.  Writers applying in more than one genre must submit separate applications, including a non-refundable processing fee for each genre.

The Fine Arts Work Center actively seeks applicants from all backgrounds, and does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, sexual orientation, marital status, ancestry, disability, HIV status, or veteran status.  

AWARD: Writing Fellows are provided with a private, furnished apartment and a monthly stipend of $750.  Fellows are required to remain in residence at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, during the seven-month Fellowship.

SUBMISSION FEE: $50

DEADLINE: December 1, 2017

web.fawc.org/writers

 

BUZZFEED EMERGING WRITERS FELLOWSHIP

INFO: With the mission of diversifying the broader media landscape by investing in the next generation of necessary voices, BuzzFeed's Emerging Writers Fellowship is designed to give writers of great promise the support, mentorship, and experience necessary to take a transformative step forward in their careers.

During the four-month program, the writers in this fellowship will benefit from career mentorship and editorial guidance while also receiving financial support. The learning process must be financially viable for emerging writers if it is intended to open the gates to writers traditionally locked out of opportunities in media.

The fellows will focus on personal essay writing, cultural reportage, and criticism. During their time in fellowship, writers will be expected to pitch, report, and write with the added benefit of panel discussions with editors and writers from throughout the industry, and assigned readings. Mentorship within the program will focus on teaching writers how to thrive as freelancers as well as on staff at media organizations; this mentorship will hopefully continue well after the fellowship itself is concluded.

Ideal candidates for the BuzzFeed Emerging Writers Fellowship must have ambitious ideas and a proven desire to publish cultural criticism, personal essays, and reported pieces that create an impact on cultural conversations. The three writers selected for the fellowship will work with BuzzFeed News’ senior editorial staff; this is a full-time position based in BuzzFeed’s New York office. The work produced during the fellowship will be published on BuzzFeed.

STIPEND: $14,000

DEADLINE: December 4, 2017

buzzfeed.com/saeedjones/buzzfeed-emerging-writers

fellowship?utm_term=.kfEVxAyVey#.lm39o5k97k

 

 

 

FICTION / NONFICTION - OCTOBER 2017

SPILLWAYS WRITER RESIDENCY FOR 2018-19

Antenna

INFO: A spillway is an engineering feat that provides controlled release of water from a river levee. Several spillways surround the city of New Orleans providing important control of flooding from the Mississippi. For Antenna, the Spillways residency is a way of providing the meaningful dispersion of outside thought and practice into the city through the development of creative feats. Spillways hosts national and international artists, writers, and cultural organizers that are interested in developing projects within the greater New Orleans region, and whose efforts question, transform, or expand the vibrant visual and literary culture of the area. At least four residents are chosen every other year to develop ambitious projects that aim for thoughtful public impact and engagement within the greater New Orleans region.

RESIDENCY: Residents will be awarded paid travel to and from New Orleans, an initial two week stay in Press Street’s residency space, a $1000 honorarium, and introductions to local stakeholders in their areas of interest. Spillways focuses on process over production, so in these initial immersive two weeks, residents are encouraged to come with an open mind and let their ideas adapt to what they have learned. Each resident’s experience will be modeled to spark project ideas that react in unique and interesting ways to the cultural fabric of the city.

PROJECTS: Once returning home, residents will have up to three months to develop a proposal for a project within the greater New Orleans area (defined as a 50 mile radius from city center). Antenna encourages ambitious project proposals that aim for thoughtful public impact or engagement, which must include a significant outreach component. This could range from visits to local schools, free community workshops, public lectures, or other programs that help the public to better understand the resident’s creative process.

Once a proposal is received, the Antenna team works immediately assessing feasibility and tailoring its approach based on the needs of the project, including funding and materials required. Not every project proposal will be accepted, though if it is, the spillways resident will have the full support, and assistance of the Antenna staff and the organization’s 12 years of experience working in the region to assist at every step to help bring the idea to life. Budget/funding and additional visits and time in the city are adapted to the needs of each approved project, and thus both of these important aspects of a project are left open ended until the proposal stage of each residency. Despite ultimately being the resident’s project, Antenna envisions this process being inherently collaborative and the most successful projects will incorporate New Orleans’ based individuals into their development.

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Oct 4, 2017: Deadline for applications 
  • Nov 2017: Residents announced
  • January 2018-December 2018 : Residency Period
  • January 2019-December 2019 : Project Development

antenna.works/spillways-artist-writer-residency-for-2018-19/

 

PEN/ PHYLLIS NAYLOR WORKING WRITER FELLOWSHIP

INFO: The PEN/Phyllis Naylor Working Writer Fellowship is offered annually to an author of children's or young-adult fiction. It has been developed to help writers whose work is of high literary caliber and is designed to assist a writer at a crucial moment in his or her career to complete a book-length work-in-progress.

The Fellowship is made possible by a substantial contribution from PEN Member Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, the prolific author of more than 140 books, including Now I'll Tell You Everything, the 28th and final book in the acclaimed "Alice" series, as well as Faith, Hope, and Ivy June andShiloh, the first novel in a trilogy, which won the 1992 Newbery Medal.

PRIZE: $5,000 

DEADLINE: October 13, 2017

pen.org/content/penphyllis-naylor-working-writer-fellowship-5000

 

WRITERS OMI AT LEDIG HOUSE

INFO: Since its founding in 1992, Writers Omi at Ledig House has hosted hundreds of authors and translators, representing more than fifty countries. We welcome published writers and translators of every type of literature. International, cultural and creative exchange is a foundation of our mission, and a wide distribution of national background is an important part of our selection process. 

Guests may select a residency of one week to two months; about ten at a time gather to live and work in a rural setting overlooking the Catskill Mountains. Ledig House provides all meals, and each night a local chef prepares dinner. Daytime is reserved for writing and quiet activities, while evenings are more communal. A program of weekly visits bring guests from the New York publishing community. Noted editors, agents and book scouts are invited to share dinner and conversation on both creative and practical subjects, offering insight into the workings of the publishing industry, and introductions to some of its key professionals. 

German publisher, Heinrich Maria Ledig-Rowohlt, for whom the program is named, was noted for his passionate commitment to quality in literature. Writers Omi has hosted hundreds of writers and translators from roughly 50 countries around the world. The colony's strong international emphasis reflects the spirit of cultural exchange that is part of Ledig's enduring legacy. 

DEADLINE: October 20, 2017

artomi.org/program.php?Writers-Omi-4

 

PEN / BELLWETHER PRIZE FOR SOCIALLY ENGAGED FICTION

Pen America

INFO: The Bellwether Prize, which was established in 2000 by Barbara Kingsolver and is funded entirely by her, was created to promote fiction that addresses issues of social justice and the impact of culture and politics on human relationships.

AWARD: $25,000 prize is awarded biennially to the author of a previously unpublished novel of high literary caliber that exemplifies the prize’s founding principles. The winner also receives a publishing contract with Algonquin Books.

SUBMISSION FEE: $25

DEADLINE: October 26, 2017

pen.org/content/penbellwether-prize-socially-engaged-fiction-25000

 

2017 QUEER SOUTHEAST ASIA BOOK AWARD

INFO: The award is open to all emerging Southeast Asian writers. It comes with SGD 1,000 (tax-free) and book publication. The winning manuscript will be critically introduced by one of the editors of Queer Southeast Asia: a literary journal of transgressive art.

WHAT TO SUBMIT:

1. Full-length manuscript without the author’s identifying information and acknowledgments. Submitted manuscripts should not be under consideration in another competition or for publication by another press. PDF copy only.

  • For poetry submissions -- Submissions must be in Times New Roman (font size 12) and single-spaced with 1 inch margin on all sides. Page number must appear consecutively at the center of the bottom margin of each page.
  • For prose submissions -- Submissions must be in Times New Roman (font size 12) and double-spaced with 1 inch margin on all sides. Page number must appear consecutively at the center of the bottom margin of each page.
  • Note: prose genres except novel.

2. The author must provide an essay (2-4 pages; single-spaced) answering the questions below. The essay must appear in the manuscript after the title page and before the contents.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The essay will not be judged. Submitting writers should take this requirement as a way to introduce the context/s within which they write and the things they do in order to create or be creative. In addition, the questions below are supposed to be just guide questions. If submitting writers feel they should avoid these questions and respond to others not stated here, they may freely do so.

  • Question 1 -- As an artist, what of (queer) Southeast Asia are you concerned the most?
  • Question 2 -- How is your submitted manuscript relevant to (queer) Southeast Asia?
  • Question 3 -- What politics, frameworks, or conditions shaped your manuscript and the writing of your manuscript?
  • Question 4 -- What kind of impact do you wish your manuscript to incite?

3. The author’s curriculum vitae. No prescribed length. PDF copy only.

Note: The author's CV will not be judged. The author should submit only one manuscript.

DEADLINE: November 1, 2017.

queersoutheastasia.com/book-prize

FICTION / NONFICTION - SEPTEMBER 2017

THE COMMONWEALTH SHORT STORY PRIZE

Commonwealth Writers 

INFO: The Prize is awarded for the best piece of unpublished short fiction (2,000–5,000 words) in English written by a citizen of a Commonwealth country.

Short stories translated into English from other languages are also eligible, and they invite writers from Mozambique who write in Portuguese, and writers who write in Swahili and Bengali, and who do not have an English translation of their story, to submit their stories in the original language.

PRIZE: Regional winners receive £2,500 and the overall winner receives £5,000.

SUBMISSION PERIOD: September 1 – November 1, 2017

commonwealthwriters.org/our-projects/the-short-story/

 

ANISFIELD-WOLF BOOK AWARDS

INFO: The Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards recognizes outstanding works that contribute to the understanding of racism and the appreciation of cultural diversity. Awards are given for fiction, poetry and nonfiction. 

To submit a book for consideration, send five copies with a completed copy of the Entry Form to:

Karen R. Long
c/o Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards
The Cleveland Foundation
1422 Euclid Avenue, Suite 1300
Cleveland, OH 44115

Phone: 216.685.2018
Email: Submit@Anisfield-Wolf.org

Upon receipt, the books will be forwarded to the jury. All submitted materials become the property of the Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards and will not be returned. The winners will be announced in the spring.  

SUBMISSION PERIOD: September 1 – December 31, 2017

anisfield-wolf.org/submissions/submission-guidelines/  

 

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Commonwealth Writers 

INFO: The Shanghai Literary Review accepts submissions for web and print on a rolling basis.  They only accept submissions via our online submission manager.

They are interested in art and criticism about urbanism, globalism, identity, and transnationalism, though by no means should submissions be limited to those topics. Selected works will be published online and/or in print and be automatically entered into their annual end-of-year contest where cash prizes will be awarded.Fiction - less than 5,000 words

  • Poetry - 2 poems submission limit per person
  • Nonfiction & Essay - less than 5,000 words
  • Flash Fiction or Nonfiction - less than 500 words
  • Visual Art - photography, video, photo essay, collage, painting, sketch, etc.
  • Translation - translation into English of any poetry, essay or short fiction from Asia, or vice versa, along with the original text
  • Book Review - pitch book review ideas to us, on fiction or non-fiction from or about Asia

SUBMISSION FEE: $0

DEADLINE: September 3, 2017

shanghailiterary.com/submissions/

 

RADCLIFFE INSTITUTE FELLOWSHIPS

Harvard University

 INFO: The Radcliffe Institute Fellowship Program is a scholarly community where individuals pursue advanced work across a wide range of academic disciplines, professions, and creative arts (including Fiction, Poetry, Nonfiction/Biography/ Autobiography/Memoir, Nonfiction/Current Issues, Playwriting or Screenwriting, and other topics). 

To be considered for a fellowship in fiction or nonfiction, applicants must have any of the following: one or more published books, contract for the publication of a book-length manuscript, or at least three shorter works (longer than newspaper articles) published. Evidence of publication in print format within the last five years is highly desirable; Web site publications are not acceptable as the only form of previously published work. Applicants should note that reviewers take into account evidence of a distinctive, original voice, richness or dimensionality of text, and coherence in the project plan. Professionals interested in writing about their work experiences should apply in the category of nonfiction. Recommendations from editors and/or agents are not acceptable.

STIPEND: Up to $77,500 for one year with additional funds for project expenses. Some support for relocation expenses is provided where relevant. They work with fellows with families who have particular issues connected to relocating to smooth the transition. If so directed, Radcliffe will pay the stipend to the fellow’s home institution. Please note that they can only pay stipends to home institutions if they are US based. Fellows receive office or studio space and access to libraries and other resources of Harvard University during the fellowship year, which extends from early September 2018 through May 31, 2019.

Fellows are expected to be free of their regular commitments so they may devote themselves full time to the work outlined in their proposal. Since this is a residential fellowship, they expect fellows to reside in the Boston area during that period and to have their primary office at the Institute so that they can participate fully in the life of the community.

Applicants will be notified by e-mail in March of the results.

DEADLINE: September 14, 2017

radcliffe.harvard.edu/fellowship-program/how-apply

 

MACDOWELL COLONY RESIDENCY

INFO: The MacDowell Colony provides time, space, and an inspiring environment to artists of exceptional talent. A MacDowell Fellowship, or residency, consists of exclusive use of a studio, accommodations, and three prepared meals a day for up to eight weeks. There are no residency fees.

The Colony accepts applications from artists working in the following disciplines: architecture, film/video arts, interdisciplinary arts, literature, music composition, theatre, and visual arts. The sole criterion for acceptance is artistic excellence, which the Colony defines in a pluralistic and inclusive way. MacDowell encourages applications from artists representing the widest possible range of perspectives and demographics, and welcomes artists engaging in the broadest spectrum of artistic practice and investigating an unlimited array of inquiries and concerns. To that end, emerging as well as established artists are invited to apply.  

DEADLINE: September 15, 2017

macdowellcolony.org/apply-appguidelines.html

 

PHYLLIS NAYLOR WORKING WRITER FELLOWSHIP

Pen America

INFO: The PEN/Phyllis Naylor Working Writer Fellowship is offered annually to an author of children’s or young-adult fiction. It has been developed to help writers whose work is of high literary caliber and is designed to assist a writer at a crucial moment in his or her career to complete a book-length work-in-progress.

The Fellowship is made possible by a substantial contribution from PEN Member Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, the prolific author of more than 140 books, including Now I’ll Tell You Everything, the 28th and final book in the acclaimed “Alice” series, as well as Faith, Hope, and Ivy June and Shiloh, the first novel in a trilogy, which won the 1992 Newbery Medal.

AWARD: $5,000

DEADLINE: September 15, 2017

pen.org/literary-award/penphyllis-naylor-working-writer-fellowship-5000/

 

THE HODDER FELLOWSHIP

Princeton University

INFO: The Hodder Fellowship will be given to artists and writers of exceptional promise to pursue independent projects at Princeton University during the academic year. Potential Hodder Fellows are writers, composers, choreographers, visual artists, performance artists, or other kinds of artists or humanists who have “much more than ordinary intellectual and literary gifts”; they are selected more “for promise than for performance.” Given the strength of the applicant pool, most successful Fellows have published a first book or have similar achievements in their own fields; the Hodder is designed to provide Fellows with the “studious leisure” to undertake significant new work. 

DEADLINE: September 19, 2017

arts.princeton.edu/fellowships/hodder-fellowship/

 

CULLMAN CENTER FELLOWSHIP

New York Public Library 

INFO: The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers offers fellowships to people whose work will benefit directly from access to the research collections at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street (formerly the Humanities and Social Sciences Library).

The Cullman Center’s Selection Committee awards up to 15 fellowships a year to outstanding scholars and writers – academics, independent scholars, journalists, and creative writers. Foreign nationals conversant in English are welcome to apply.

The Cullman Center looks for top-quality writing from academics as well as from creative writers and independent scholars. It aims to promote dynamic communication about literature and scholarship at the very highest level – within the Center, in public forums throughout the Library, and in the Fellows’ published work. 

PRIZE: A stipend of up to $70,000, an office, a computer, and full access to the Library's physical and electronic resources.

Fellows work at the Center for the duration of the fellowship term, which runs from September through May. Each Fellow gives a talk over lunch on current work-in-progress to the other Fellows and to a wide range of invited guests, and may be asked to take part in other programs at The New York Public Library.

DEADLINE: September 30, 2017

nypl.org/help/about-nypl/fellowships-institutes/center-for-scholars-and-writers/fellowships-at-the-cullman-center

  

NEW VOICES AWARD 

Lee & Low Books

INFO: Lee & Low Books, award-winning publisher of children’s books, announces its annual New Voices Award, which will be given for a children’s picture book manuscript by a writer of color.

Established in 2000, the New Voices Award encourages writers of color to submit their work to a publisher that takes pride in nurturing new talent. The contest is open to writers of color who are residents of the United States, 18 years or older at the time of entry, and who have not previously had a children’s picture book published.   

Submissions may be fiction, nonfiction, or poetry for children ages 5 to 12.

PRIZE: The Award winner receives a cash prize of $1,000 and our standard publication contract, including L&L’s basic advance and royalties for a first time author. An Honor Award winner will receive a cash prize of $500. 

DEADLINE: September 30, 2017

leeandlow.com/writers-illustrators/new-voices-award

 

PEN / BELLWETHER PRIZE FOR SOCIALLY ENGAGED FICTION

Pen America

INFO: The Bellwether Prize, which was established in 2000 by Barbara Kingsolver and is funded entirely by her, was created to promote fiction that addresses issues of social justice and the impact of culture and politics on human relationships.

AWARD: $25,000 prize is awarded biennially to the author of a previously unpublished novel of high literary caliber that exemplifies the prize’s founding principles. The winner also receives a publishing contract with Algonquin Books.

SUBMISSION FEE: $25

DEADLINE: October 26, 2017

pen.org/content/penbellwether-prize-socially-engaged-fiction-25000

FICTION / NONFICTION - AUGUST 2017

EMERGING VOICES FELLOWSHIP

PEN Center USA

INFO: The Emerging Voices Fellowship is a literary mentorship that aims to provide new writers who are isolated from the literary establishment with the tools, skills, and knowledge they need to launch a professional writing career.

LITERARY MENTORSHIP BENEFITS

By the end of the Emerging Voices Fellowship, a writer will leave with:

  • Seven months of guidance from a professional mentor and written notes on their current writing project.
  • An author photo and bio.
  • A logline—the short summation of the project in progress.
  • A clear action plan for finishing this project.
  • Writing life, and craft tips, from notable visiting authors.
  • An editing guide from a professional copy editor.
  • Insider knowledge of publishing from agents, publishers, and editors.
  • An individualized submission guide for literary journals, agents, residencies, and fellowships.
  • Improved reading technique from a professional voice coach.
  • Public reading experience for a variety of audiences.
  • An understanding of how to be an effective workshop participant.
  • Lifetime membership in PEN Center USA.
  • An introduction to the Los Angeles literary community.

FELLOWSHIP COMPONENTS

The seven-month fellowship includes:

PROFESSIONAL MENTORSHIP: Emerging Voices Mentors are carefully chosen from PEN Center USA’s membership and from professional writers based in Los Angeles. The Mentor-Fellow relationship is expected to challenge the fellow's work and compel significant creative progress. Over the course of the fellowship, Emerging Voices Fellows and Mentors should meet three times in person, and be in contact at least once a month. In these three meetings, Mentors will offer written feedback on the Emerging Voices Fellows’ work in progress. Authors who have been mentors in the past include Ron Carlson, Harryette Mullen, Chris Abani, Ramona Ausubel, Meghan Daum, and Sherman Alexie.

CLASSES AT THE UCLA EXTENSION WRITERS’ PROGRAM: Participants will attend two free courses (a 12-week writing course and a one-day workshop) at UCLA Extension, donated by the Writers’ Program. Program Manager will assist the Emerging Voices Fellows with course selection.

AUTHOR EVENINGS: Every Monday, fellows will meet with a visiting author, editor or publisher and ask questions about craft. Fellows must read each visiting author's book before the evening. A schedule of Author Evenings is distributed at the first Emerging Voices orientation meeting. 

Click here for info for the Emerging Voices Author Evening Series, which is open to the public. 

MASTER CLASSES: After completing the UCLA Extension Writers' Program courses, Emerging Voices Fellows will enroll in a Master Class. The Master Class is a genre-specific workshop with a professional writer that affords fellows the opportunity to exchange feedback on their works in progress. The 2017 Master Class Instructors are Alex Espinoza (fiction and nonfiction), and F. Douglas Brown (poetry).

VOLUNTEER PROJECT: All Emerging Voices Fellows are expected to complete a 25-hour volunteer project that is relevant to the literary community. 

VOICE INSTRUCTION CLASS: The Fellowship will provide a one-day workshop with Dave Thomas, a professional voice actor. The Emerging Voices Fellows will read their work in a recording studio and receive instruction on reading their work publicly.

PUBLIC READINGS: Fellows will participate in three public readings, The Welcome Party, Tongue & Groove Salon, and the Final Reading. Fellows have read in various venues and events including the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, Silver Lake Jubilee, Skylight Bookstore, The Standard, Downtown LA, and Hotel Café. The fellowship culminates in a Final Reading showcasing the progress each fellow has made in his or her work.

STIPEND: The fellowship includes a $1,000 stipend, given in $500 increments.

The Emerging Voices Fellowship runs from January to July. Participants need not be published, but the fellowship is directed toward poets and writers of fiction and creative nonfiction with clear ideas of what they hope to accomplish through their writing. 

DEADLINE: August 1, 2017. 

penusa.org/programs/emerging-voices

 

WRITER TO WRITER MENTORSHIP PROGRAM

Association of Writers & Writing Programs

INFO: AWP's mentorship program, Writer to Writer, matches emerging writers and published authors for a three-month series of modules on topics such as craft, revision, publishing, and the writing life. Mentors volunteer their time and receive a free one-year AWP membership. Writer to Writer is free of charge to mentees.

Should you be chosen to participate, your mentor will review your writing, listen to your concerns, and help you problem solve. You will have opportunities to interact with others taking part in that session, and AWP's membership team will be there with you every step of the way.

Their Fall session begins each September and consists of six modules over a three-month period, concluding mid-December.

Their Spring session begins each February and consists of six modules over a three-month period, concluding mid-May.

SUBMISSION FEE: $0

DEADLINE: August 12, 2017

awpwriter.org/community_calendar/mentorship_program_overview

 

ERNEST J. GAINES AWARD FOR LITERARY EXCELLENCE

Baton Rouge Area Foundation

INFO: The Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence honors Louisiana’s revered storyteller, Ernest J. Gaines, and serves to inspire and recognize rising African-American fiction writers of excellence at a national level. The book award, initiated by donors of the Baton Rouge Area Foundation, is now in its ninth year and has become nationally recognized in its role of enhancing visibility of emerging black fiction writers while also expanding the audience for this literature.  

The 2017 panel of judges are themselves renowned contributors to the literary world. They are Anthony Grooms, Edward P. Jones, Elizabeth Nunez, Francine Prose and Patricia Towers.

The Baton Rouge Area Foundation sponsors the winner’s travel to Baton Rouge, Louisiana to receive the prize at a ceremony attended by Ernest Gaines where the author reads an excerpt from the selected work of fiction.

The literary award winner also participates in educational activities at selected area schools and after-school programs in keeping with the Gaines Award's interest in emphasizing the role of literature and arts in education. Through small creative writing workshops with the winning author, students are encouraged to pursue reading, delve into their own creativity, and to consider becoming an author. 

AWARD: $10,000 cash to support the writer and help enable her/him to focus on her/his art of writing. 

DEADLINE: August 15, 2017

ernestjgainesaward.org/literary-award-criteria-registration/

 

2017 RED HEN PRESS FICTION AWARD

INFO: Established in 2015 to nurture the unique and vibrant channels through which fiction has carried us, the Red Hen Fiction Award is for a fresh and original story of fiction with a minimum of 150 pages. The awarded fiction manuscript is selected through an annual submission process which is open to all authors.

JUDGE: Charles Yu

AWARD: $1,000 and publication by Red Hen Press

SUBMISSION FEE: $20

DEADLINE: August 17, 2017

redhen.org/awards-2/red-hen-press-fiction-award/

 

FALL 2017 AWARDS

Sustainable Arts Foundation

INFO: Sustainable Arts Foundation – a non-profit foundation supporting artists and writers with families – is committed to offering half of its awards to applicants of color.

Writers may apply in one of the following categories:

  • Fiction
  • Creative Nonfiction
  • Poetry
  • Long Form Journalism
  • Playwriting
  • Picture Books
  • Early and Middle Grade Fiction
  • Young Adult Fiction
  • Graphic Novel

AWARDS:

  • Sustainable Arts Foundation Award: $6,000
  • Sustainable Arts Foundation Promise Award: $2,000

DEADLINE: August 31, 2017

apply.sustainableartsfoundation.org/

 

THE SUBMERGING WRITER FELLOWSHIP

Fear No Lit

INFO: In 2017, FEAR NO LIT will pull one submerging writer out of the water. The fellowship is for writers who have the chops but lack the luck; who drown, who try, who try again; who try again so many times there might not be any tries left; who see writing as both a buoy and shark-bite—a boogie-board and an iceberg; who would love to attend AWP to meet the writers they admire but just can’t fucking afford it; who are sinking in the giant sea of the writing industry.

AWARD:

  • a chapbook (limited-edition print run of 50 copies)
  • a launch party at AWP 18 (reading featuring the winner & 3 finalists)
  • $500 for AWP 18 expenses (travel, room)
  • $500 to spend however they like, no strings attached (maybe scuba gear?)
  • In addition, three finalists will receive complimentary registration to AWP 2018 in Tampa, FL.

DEADLINE: August 31, 2017

fearnolit.com/fellowship/

 

PEN / BELLWETHER PRIZE FOR SOCIALLY ENGAGED FICTION

Pen America

INFO: The Bellwether Prize, which was established in 2000 by Barbara Kingsolver and is funded entirely by her, was created to promote fiction that addresses issues of social justice and the impact of culture and politics on human relationships.

AWARD: $25,000 prize is awarded biennially to the author of a previously unpublished novel of high literary caliber that exemplifies the prize’s founding principles. The winner also receives a publishing contract with Algonquin Books.

SUBMISSION FEE: $25

DEADLINE: October 26, 2017

pen.org/content/penbellwether-prize-socially-engaged-fiction-25000

 

 

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